Anthropology

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  • Kunstkamera: News from Around the Web

    Anthropogenesis
    German Dziebel
    5 Nov 2014 | 10:32 am
    1. Patagonian Monsters. A new website run by Argentina-based Austin Whittall is a wealth of sharp analyses of human genetic variation from an intellectual point of view that’s close to out-of-America II. Whittall is critical of the mainstream interpretations of human genetic variation and explores the possibility of an early peopling of the Americas by Neandertals and /or Homo erectus and a back migration from America to Asia (here and here).The blog’s name is the reverse from the objective, formal and dispassionate content that the professional engineer Whittall produces…
  • Another look at the two-systems model of mindreading

    International Cognition and Culture Institute
    25 Oct 2014 | 8:50 am
    Apperly and Butterfill (2009) and Butterfill and Apperly (2013) have proposed a two-systems model of mindreading. According to this model, humans make use of two distinct psychological systems in mindreading tasks. The model rests on three related claims. First of all, the early-developing system, which is taken to be efficient, fast and inflexible, is supposed to explain the positive findings based on spontaneous-response tasks showing that infants can track the contents of others’ false beliefs. The later-developing system, which is taken to be slower, inefficient and…
  • African Genome Variation project paper

    Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog
    Dienekes
    6 Dec 2014 | 12:02 pm
    A choice quote: To assess the effect of gene flow on population differentiation in SSA, we masked Eurasian ancestry across the genome (Supplementary Methods and Supplementary Note 6). This markedly reduced population differentiation, as measured by a decline in mean pairwise FST from 0.021 to 0.015 (Supplementary Note 6), suggests that Eurasian ancestry has a substantial impact on differentiation among SSA populations. We speculate that residual differentiation between Ethiopian and other SSA populations after masking Eurasian ancestry (pairwise FST = 0.027) may be a remnant of East African…
  • "Ancient DNA: the first three decades" meeting papers

    Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog
    Dienekes
    9 Dec 2014 | 10:48 am
    A bucketload of papers here. Some titles of interest:Where are the Caribs? Ancient DNA from ceramic period human remains in the Lesser AntillesIdentification of kinship and occupant status in Mongolian noble burials of the Yuan Dynasty through a multidisciplinary approachThe ancient Yakuts: a population genetic enigmaAncient mitochondrial DNA from the northern fringe of the Neolithic farming expansion in Europe sheds light on the dispersion processMitochondrial DNA variation in the Viking age population of NorwayAlmost 20 years of Neanderthal palaeogenetics: adaptation, admixture, diversity,…
  • Discovery of official clay seals support existence of biblical kings David and Solomon, archaeologists say

    Anthropology News -- ScienceDaily
    16 Dec 2014 | 7:04 am
    Six official clay seals found by an archaeological team at a small site in Israel offer evidence that supports the existence of biblical kings David and Solomon. Many modern scholars dismiss David and Solomon as mythological figures and believe no kingdom could have existed in the region at the time the Bible recounted their activities. The new finds provide evidence that some type of government activity was conducted there in that period.
 
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    Anthropology.net

  • 430,000 Year Old Shell Engravings By Homo Erectus from Trinil, Java

    Kambiz Kamrani
    5 Dec 2014 | 12:47 pm
    Wim Lustenhouwer/VU University Amsterdam. A shell found on Java in the late 1800s was recently found to bear markings that seem to have been carved intentionally half a million years ago. The photograph is about 15 millimetres wide. The engraved shell pictured come from a freshwater mussel species that were collected in the 1890s by the Dutch paleontologist Eugène Dubois, from Trinil. The first H. erectus calvarium was also found there. Duboid brough home many other artifacts as well and were stored away in Leiden, Netherlands. Henk Caspers/Naturalis. The shell, from a freshwater mussel,…
  • Kostenki 14 – A 36,000 Year Old European

    Kambiz Kamrani
    7 Nov 2014 | 12:37 pm
    Just what makes a European? European genetic ancestry used to seem straightforward and in general is now understood as an admixture of three sources; indigenous European hunter-gatherers from 42,00 to 45,000 ago, Middle Easterners from the agricultural revolution 10,000 years ago, and Central Asians who charged through Europe in the last 4,000 to 5,000 years. Last month, a paper in Nature, suggested at each entity entered Europe by way of a separate migrations and only coalesced in the last 5,000 years. A new study published in yesterday’s Science changes this suggestion. The 1954…
  • The Story of Place

    Kambiz Kamrani
    7 Nov 2014 | 10:44 am
    The Story of Place is a short film about the unprotected territory of the Greater Canyonlands. This film follows Craig Childs, Ace Kvale and Jim Enote, who narrate the story of this grand landscape, and its pivotal role in the peopling the Americas. This region of southeastern Utah is a veritable well of human culture history. You may know of Canyonlands National Park as a colorful landscape created by rivers eroding into countless canyons, mesas, and buttes. This National Park was created by President Lyndon Johnson on September 12, 1964 and is divided into four districts: the Island in the…
  • Anthropology Deciphers the Ebola Crisis

    nataliamagnani
    30 Oct 2014 | 6:05 am
    To the world outside that of the victims, The Ebola crisis is one of hazmat suits and anonymous bodies. However, emerging along with the voices of doctors are those of medical anthropologists, who ask for an interior perspective in dealing with the epidemic. West African countries are truly suffering, particularly those of Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Guinea. According to anthropologist Adia Benton, in an article by Providence Journal, numbers are most likely much higher than reported. Along with hospital counts are those bodies too weak to ever make it to a hospital and into statistics books.
  • The Lives Behind Plant Documents

    nataliamagnani
    10 Oct 2014 | 1:42 pm
    In the county of Uasin Gishu, Kenya, a recent article in Ethnobotany Research and Applications, local plants have many uses for fodder, medicine, food, and building material, but today this knowledge is threatened by increased pressures on the land. While the list of plants and their uses provides valuable basic knowledge, the article heightened my interest in a completely different realm of inquiry. Medicinal plants in particular have very social, dynamic lives, from their administration by healers or healthcare personnel, to the everyday person collecting for personal health needs, to the…
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    Savage Minds

  • The Future at Last: Unraveling the Embargo on Cuba

    Carole McGranahan
    20 Dec 2014 | 10:09 am
    [Savage Minds is pleased to publish this essay by L. Kaifa Roland who is Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Colorado in Boulder. Kaifa is the author of Cuban Color in Tourism and La Lucha: An Ethnography of Racial Meaning (OUP, 2010) “T/racing Belonging in Cuban Tourism” (Cultural Anthropology, August 2013), and “Between Belonging and the F/Act of Niggerisation” in Trayvon Martin, Race, and American Justice: Writing Wrong (Sense Publishers, 2014). Currently, she is doing ethnographic research with Black women entrepreneurs in Havana.] Just…
  • Doing Concept Work: An Interview with Ann Stoler about the Institute for Critical Social Inquiry

    Rex
    19 Dec 2014 | 4:42 pm
    (The Institute for Critical Social Inquiry [ICSI] is a program getting under way at the New School for Social Research, where advanced graduate students and junior faculty will have the opportunity to spend a week at The New School’scampus in Greenwich Village, New York City, working closely with some of the most distinguished thinkers shaping the course of contemporary social inquiry (you can apply here — they have financial aid!). Its director, Ann Stoler is a historian/anthropologist whose work has had a tremendous impact on how anthropologists and historians think about history…
  • Anthropologies/Savage Minds student debt survey: THE DEBTORS

    Ryan
    18 Dec 2014 | 1:00 am
    Earlier this year I posted two informal student debt surveys here on Savage Minds as part of the Anthropologies issue on Student Debt. Both of these surveys focused on student debt in anthropology. Here at long last are some of the results. (Sorry for taking so long  to get to this…I was writing a dissertation over the last nine or so months.)* There was a lot of data to sift through. In this post I’ll discuss the first survey, which had 285 total responses. We’ll start with the highest level of education attained. Thirty-four percent have completed their MA. Thirty-three have…
  • Revolutionary Time: First Thoughts on a Concept

    Carole McGranahan
    17 Dec 2014 | 1:55 pm
    [Savage Minds is pleased to publish this essay by Melissa Rosario who is a Postdoctoral Fellow in Anthropology at Bowdoin College. Melissa is a cultural anthropologist interested in the politics of autonomy for Caribbean peoples and marginalized U.S. groups, particularly Puerto Ricans. She is currently writing a book tentatively titled Revolutionary Time: A Treatise on the Cultural Logics of Resistance in Puerto Rico and the Caribbean.] These days, I have been thinking a lot about revolution. Names of places—Ayotzinapa, Ferguson, Staten Island—now immediately trigger an affective…
  • The Language of Food by Dan Jurafsky

    Rex
    16 Dec 2014 | 4:20 pm
    Jurafsky, Dan. 2014. The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu. New York: W.W. Norton & Company. The Language of Food has always been one of my favorite blogs, and so when I heard that it was being turned into a blook, I leapt at the chance to review it. Having now read the book, I still like Jurafsky’s writing and approach, but feel the blog was occasionally unable to transition of the Internet and on to the page. And yet, despite the beefs anthropologists might have with the book, I find myself recommending it to non-academic friends both because it makes a fine read, and…
 
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    Anthropology News -- ScienceDaily

  • Contrasting views of kin selection assessed

    17 Dec 2014 | 10:14 am
    Researchers have used several different ways of testing Hamilton's rule, the core mathematical formula of kin selection, as an explanation for the evolution of much altruistic behavior in animals. These vary in their realism and their ability to generate predictions. The variety of approaches, as well as different views about what constitutes an explanation, helps explain a divisive debate about the importance of kin selection in evolution. A new criterion of 'causal aptness' could help resolve disputes.
  • DNA sheds light on why largest lemurs disappeared: Giant lemurs' demise linked to size, low numbers

    16 Dec 2014 | 11:41 am
    DNA from giant lemurs that lived thousands of years ago in Madagascar may help explain why the animals went extinct, and what makes some lemurs more at risk today. Scientists have little doubt that humans played a role in the giant lemurs' demise. By comparing the species that died out to those that survived, scientists hope to better predict which lemurs are most in need of protection in the future.
  • Discovery of official clay seals support existence of biblical kings David and Solomon, archaeologists say

    16 Dec 2014 | 7:04 am
    Six official clay seals found by an archaeological team at a small site in Israel offer evidence that supports the existence of biblical kings David and Solomon. Many modern scholars dismiss David and Solomon as mythological figures and believe no kingdom could have existed in the region at the time the Bible recounted their activities. The new finds provide evidence that some type of government activity was conducted there in that period.
  • Dental plaque reveals key plant in prehistoric Easter Island diet

    15 Dec 2014 | 3:53 pm
    A student analyzing dental calculus from ancient teeth is helping resolve the question of what plant foods Easter Islanders relied on before European contact.
  • Evidence of Viking/Norse metalworking in Arctic Canada

    15 Dec 2014 | 12:48 pm
    A small stone container found by archaeologists a half-century ago has now been recognized as further evidence of a Viking or Medieval Norse presence in Arctic Canada during the centuries around 1000 A.D.
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    NYT > Archaeology and Anthropology

  • Layers of History in Turkish Artistry

    5 Dec 2014 | 10:00 am
    Sevan Bicakci makes domed gemstone rings carved internally with images that celebrate Istanbul’s layers of Byzantine and Ottoman heritage.
  • On the Trail of an Ancient Mystery

    24 Nov 2014 | 9:00 pm
    More than 100 years after it was found, and more than 2,000 years after it was believed to have been built, the Antikythera Mechanism continues to raise questions and provide answers.
  • When Is a War Over?

    22 Nov 2014 | 9:00 pm
    What an Army major and Alexander the Great tell us about America’s 13 years in Afghanistan.
  • Signs of the Evolutionary Step From Land to Sea

    10 Nov 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Ichthyosaurs, which loosely resembled dolphins, have long been an evolutionary mystery. Now, researchers say they have recovered an early Ichthyosaur fossil that may fill in the blanks.
  • Prehistory’s Brilliant Future

    8 Nov 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Spectacular dinosaur finds represent just a fraction of what the fossil record has to tell us.
 
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    Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog

  • "Ancient DNA: the first three decades" meeting papers

    Dienekes
    9 Dec 2014 | 10:48 am
    A bucketload of papers here. Some titles of interest:Where are the Caribs? Ancient DNA from ceramic period human remains in the Lesser AntillesIdentification of kinship and occupant status in Mongolian noble burials of the Yuan Dynasty through a multidisciplinary approachThe ancient Yakuts: a population genetic enigmaAncient mitochondrial DNA from the northern fringe of the Neolithic farming expansion in Europe sheds light on the dispersion processMitochondrial DNA variation in the Viking age population of NorwayAlmost 20 years of Neanderthal palaeogenetics: adaptation, admixture, diversity,…
  • African Genome Variation project paper

    Dienekes
    6 Dec 2014 | 12:02 pm
    A choice quote: To assess the effect of gene flow on population differentiation in SSA, we masked Eurasian ancestry across the genome (Supplementary Methods and Supplementary Note 6). This markedly reduced population differentiation, as measured by a decline in mean pairwise FST from 0.021 to 0.015 (Supplementary Note 6), suggests that Eurasian ancestry has a substantial impact on differentiation among SSA populations. We speculate that residual differentiation between Ethiopian and other SSA populations after masking Eurasian ancestry (pairwise FST = 0.027) may be a remnant of East African…
  • Remains of Richard III identified

    Dienekes
    2 Dec 2014 | 11:01 am
    From the paper:Four of the modern relatives were found to belong to Y-haplogroup R1b-U152 (x L2, Z36, Z56, M160, M126 and Z192)13, 14 with STR haplotypes being consistent with them comprising a single patrilinear group. One individual (Somerset 3) was found to belong to haplogroup I-M170 (x M253, M223) and therefore could not be a patrilinear relative of the other four within the time span considered, indicating that a false-paternity event had occurred within the last four generations. ... In contrast to the Y-haplotypes of the putative modern relatives, Skeleton 1 belongs to…
  • E-M81 in Morocco

    Dienekes
    25 Nov 2014 | 8:38 am
    Hum Biol. 2014 May;86(2):105-12. Phylogeography of e1b1b1b-m81 haplogroup and analysis of its subclades in morocco. Reguig A, Harich N, Barakat A, Rouba H. AbstractIn this study we analyzed 295 unrelated Berber-speaking men from northern, central, and southern Morocco to characterize frequency of the E1b1b1b-M81 haplogroup and to refine the phylogeny of its subclades: E1b1b1b1-M107, E1b1b1b2-M183, and E1b1b1b2a-M165. For this purpose, we typed four biallelic polymorphisms: M81, M107, M183, and M165. A large majority of the Berber-speaking male lineages belonged to the Y-chromosomal…
  • Paternal lineages and languages in the Caucasus

    Dienekes
    25 Nov 2014 | 8:01 am
    An interesting new study on Y chromosome and languages in the Caucasus. The distribution of haplogroups is on the left. The authors make some associations of haplogroups with language families:R1b: Indo-EuropeanR1a: Scytho-SarmatianJ2: Hurro-UrartianG2: KartvelianHum Biol. 2014 May;86(2):113-30.Human paternal lineages, languages, and environment in the caucasus. Tarkhnishvili D1, Gavashelishvili A1, Murtskhvaladze M1, Gabelaia M1, Tevzadze G2. AbstractPublications that describe the composition of the human Y-DNA haplogroup in diffferent ethnic or linguistic groups and geographic regions…
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    ZERO ANTHROPOLOGY

  • Cuba and the US: Castro and Obama on Establishing Diplomatic Relations

    Maximilian Forte
    17 Dec 2014 | 1:30 pm
    What follows are transcripts of the two speeches given today by Cuba’s President, Raúl Castro, and US President Barack Obama, on the establishment of diplomatic relations: STATEMENT BY THE CUBAN PRESIDENT (Havana, December 17, 2014) Fellow countrymen, Since my election as President of the State Council and Council of Ministers I have reiterated on many occasions our willingness to hold a respectful dialogue with the United States on the basis of sovereign equality, in order to deal reciprocally with a wide variety of topics without detriment to national independence and the…
  • 25 Years without the Berlin Wall

    Donnchadh Mac an Ghoill
    8 Nov 2014 | 10:11 pm
    Needless to say, the end of foreign imposed partition is an occasion of joy for any country. Here in Ireland, we look forward to the day when the British occupation will be lifted, and our land returned to native rule. Koreans also look forward to the day when Anglo-Saxon forces leave their land, and allow the Koreans to decide on their own future. But, unification is only good when the good guys win. In Germany’s case, the good guys lost. Before we go any further, we should note that Joseph Stalin had never been in favour of a partitioned Germany. Despite all that the Soviet people had…
  • Useful Atrocities

    Eva Bartlett
    26 Oct 2014 | 7:07 am
    Who outside of Syria knows the names Yara Abbas, Maya Naser, Mohamed al-Saeed…? The corporate media has inundated us with news of the two American journalists allegedly beheaded, the first of whose execution video has been deemed faked. But what of the non-Western journalists and civilians beheaded and murdered by ISIS, al-Nusra, and associated terrorists in Syria, Iraq, Lebanon, Palestine? Why didn’t the August 2012 execution (which some reported as a beheading) of TV presenter Mohamed al-Saeed, claimed by the Nusra gang, create the same outrage? Or the December 2013 kidnapping and…
  • About Those Good Intentions

    Maximilian Forte
    11 Oct 2014 | 2:52 pm
    The following, the final in our series of extracts, comes from my chapter, “Imperial Abduction Lore and Humanitarian Seduction,” which serves as the introduction to Good Intentions: Norms and Practices of Imperial Humanitarianism (Montreal: Alert Press, 2014), pp. 1-34. This section was primarily addressed to students as readers, and any constructive feedback would be appreciated. There are many valid and unimpeachable reasons why students might be considering humanitarian work and/or working for a NGO. There is no gainsaying that many students have genuine, sincere, and heartfelt reasons…
  • Realism or Iconography? The Pentagon’s Implicit Theory of Visual Representation

    Maximilian Forte
    10 Oct 2014 | 6:13 pm
    The following is an extract from my chapter, “A Flickr of Militarization: Photographic Regulation, Symbolic Consecration, and the Strategic Communication of ‘Good Intentions’,” published in Good Intentions: Norms and Practices of Imperial Humanitarianism (Montreal: Alert Press, 2014), pp. 185-279: US military documents make it quite clear that, for the military, a photograph is a straightforward, truthful, and impartial record of reality as it appeared in front of the camera. However, at the same time these documents suggest that some images might be used as “enemy propaganda”…
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    Material World

  • CFP: ASA Material Culture Caucus

    Jo Aiken
    19 Dec 2014 | 8:48 am
    The Material Culture Caucus (MCC) of the American Studies Association (ASA) wishes to encourage participation in the 2015 Annual Meeting: “The (Re)production of Misery and the Ways of Resistance,” October 8-11, 2015, Toronto, Canada. To read the conference Call for Papers please visit the ASA website. Areas of interest related to the theme include, but are not limited to, the material culture of: • War and other forms of violence • Empire and colonialism • Slavery • Crisis and trauma • Diaspora and immigration • Prisons • Poverty • ‘Basic needs’: food (and water),…
  • Exploring Digital-Visual Anthropological Research Methods: www.photoblogiran.com

    Haidy Geismar
    15 Dec 2014 | 5:13 am
    [This is an invited post from a PhD student working at Oxford University, accompanied by a series of comments about visual methods from PhD students working at UCL] Shireen Walton, PhD candidate in Anthropology, Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, University of Oxford shireen.walton@sant.ox.ac.uk Oxford Digital Ethnography Group (OxDEG)/www.facebook.com/groups/OXDEG/   In June 2013, after nine months of ethnographic fieldwork researching Iranian popular photographic practices in Iran, the UK and online, my principal participants (Iranian photobloggers, based inside and outside…
  • Exhibit B

    Pauline Destree
    9 Dec 2014 | 1:03 am
    Probing further: the untormented “white body” Protesters gather at the Vaults Gallery during a rally that led to Exhibit B by South African artist Brett Bailey being cancelled. Photograph: Thabo Jaiyesimi/Demotix/Corbis How does one review an exhibition that has been banned from public view? The censorship of Exhibit B earlier this year in London constitutes yet another interesting visual and performative episode in Brett Bailey’s controversial saga currently touring Europe, as his ‘tableaux vivants’ or living displays of black performers in various scenes (supposedly)…
  • The Power of Print

    Jo Aiken
    1 Dec 2014 | 9:56 am
    When Philae phoned home to Earth a couple of weeks ago, the world cheered. The European Space Agency (ESA) had achieved an amazing first in space exploration – landing a robotic lander on a comet! A comet! However, the cheers became somewhat subdued within hours of the landing, all because of a shirt. The print of a shirt, to be exact. London native Dr. Matt Taylor, ESA Project Scientist, sparked a social media storm with his apparel during a media briefing on that historic 12th of November.     Women, and men, from all backgrounds and professions took to Twitter in outrage at…
  • Disobedient Objects

    Haidy Geismar
    20 Nov 2014 | 6:29 am
    Hannah Knox, Lecturer in Digital Anthropology and Material Culture, UCL Anthropology Zapatistas. Attribution: Nathan Gibbsflic.kr/p/3eMx1hLicensed under Creative Commons.   In 1996 I worked in Mexico for eight months and during my time there visited the famous village of San Cristobal de las Casas in Chiapas. One of my abiding memories of San Cristobal was of the women from the village who were selling artisanal products to tourists on cloths laid out on the floor in the square in front of the church. Whilst the sale of artisanal objects was commonplace in Mexican villages, in amongst…
 
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    Museum Anthropology

  • Museum Anthropology Leaders: David Delgado Shorter, Professor & Vice Chair, Department of World Arts and Culture, University of California - Los Angeles, Part 1 of 2

    17 Dec 2014 | 2:10 pm
    Exclusive Museum Anthropology Blog Interview with David Delgado Shorter, Professor & Vice Chair, Department of World Arts and Culture, University of California - Los Angeles.This interview is the fifth installment in our series, Museum Anthropology Leaders, where blog intern Lillia McEnaney will be interviewing various anthropological museum professionals. This interview is very different than
  • Now Accepting Exhibition Announcement Submissions

    15 Dec 2014 | 9:42 am
    The Museum Anthropology Editors, Tony Chavarria and Dr. Maxine McBrinn, and Blog Intern Lillia McEnaney are now accepting submissions for exhibition announcements.  If you would like your exhibition covered on the Council for Museum Anthropology's blog, please send an email to mua4web@gmail.com or directly to Lillia. Please feel free to include press releases, images, and curatorial remarks in
  • Position Announcement: Chief Curator, IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts, Santa Fe, New Mexico

    13 Dec 2014 | 1:20 pm
    TITLE: CHIEF CURATOR DEPARTMENT: IAIA MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY NATIVE ARTS FLSA STATUS: EXEMPT (PROFESSIONAL) REPORTS TO: DIRECTOR OF MUSEUM SUPERVISES: PREPARATOR & EXHIBITIONS COORDINATOR DEADLINE: FRIDAY, JANUARY 16, 2015 SUMMARY OF RESPONSIBILITIES Chief Curator reports to the Museum Director and is responsible for the management, development and staff of the Museum’s Exhibitions
  • Call for Applicants: SAR Museum Studies Internships

    12 Dec 2014 | 1:13 pm
    The School for Advanced Research, Indian Arts Research Center (IARC) offers two nine-month internships (September 1–May 31) to individuals who are recent college graduates, current graduate students, or junior museum professionals interested in furthering their professional museum experience and enhancing their intellectual capacity for contributing to the expanding field and discourse of museum
  • The Elgin Marbles Leave Britain for First Tme

    8 Dec 2014 | 1:20 pm
    The Telegraph, Keith Perry December 5, 2014The British Museum has allowed one of the Elgin Marbles to leave London for the first time after lending a sculpture to a Russian museum.The headless statue of a Greek river-god will be unveiled in the State Hermitage Museum in St Petersburg on Friday as part of the celebrations for the institution’s 250th anniversary.The move comes despite fears of a
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    Kimberly Christian's Garcinia Cambogia

  • Pure Forloskin: How To Buy It

    admin
    15 Dec 2014 | 11:43 am
    Weight Loss is certainly an obsession for millions. What is the best way to shed pounds? How can I lose weight quickly? What method can help me lose surplus weight? These burning questions keep many of us awake at nighttime. This article will explore some of probably the most frequently asked questions associated with reduction. For most of us, we need to have answers to our questions before deciding which approach will yield the outcomes. The following thing can need test is consume a reasonable diet while choosing HCA. Eating appropriate portions of healthier foodstuffs results in a steady…
  • Forloskin – Your Lesser Known Fat Burning Solultion

    admin
    2 Dec 2014 | 2:50 pm
    Being in your teens is demanding. Not only you have to manage your busy study schedule, you have to cope having a changing body as well as raging hormones which cause damage to your skin. I remember when I was a teenager, method I look is the ideal concern for me. When my acne problems started, I remember being feeling down and depressed most of the time. The most dreaded time is always attend any social functionings. My time was mostly consumed with how help reduce my teenage acne easily. If a person trying to shed weight, pests away . an approach to fit exercise seamlessly towards your…
  • Facts About alivebynature Weight-Loss Product

    admin
    11 Nov 2014 | 3:15 pm
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  • 3 Raw Food Diet Secrets!

    admin
    24 Oct 2014 | 3:11 pm
    When Janet Lindvall sat in front of her computer, food obvious that she needed lower belly fat. It was an ugly sight to see rolls of fat bulging out from her ab. Fact 9: Metabolic disorders will cause weight realize. Diabetes and hypo thyroid are the most widespread. You need to be medically examined if believe any hang ups. As the cat ages, toxin damage occurs and the best way to make plant based protein supplement cat healthy is by supplying all of them herbs and anti-oxidants like quercitin and rutin sustain their energy. So do you want to get large, beautiful muscles? A person wish…
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    admin
    13 Aug 2014 | 2:26 am
    Bouncing could be the simplest of the rebounding exercises. it correctly, stand within middle belonging to the rebounder, with your feet shoulder-width apart and start bouncing. Begin this exercise very gently and surely able to balance yourself properly, start bouncing more rigid. The more you bend your knees, much more you can bounce harder. However, take care not to lift an individual a far too much, definitely disbalance . To make this exercise very much effective, make it strenuous by starting to jog at one put. Research has shown that bouncing and jogging on a rebounder share the same…
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    Somatosphere

  • Cristiana Giordano’s Migrants in Translation by Shirley Yeung

    Shirley Yeung
    17 Dec 2014 | 12:30 am
    Migrants in Translation: Caring and the Logics of Difference in Contemporary Italy By Cristiana Giordano University of California Press, 2014, 288 pages.   Exploring the political entailments of rehabilitating “victims of human trafficking” in Italy, Migrants in Translation speaks to the often puzzling disjuncture between recent anthropological and public discourses concerning migrant care and integration: while anthropology’s critiques have led, among social scientists, to a heightened analytic caution or else abandonment of “culture” for its potential to racialize, reify, and…
  • In the Journals, November Part 2 by Jessica Cooper

    Jessica Cooper
    15 Dec 2014 | 8:12 am
    For those of you who think that time is moving too quickly this holiday season, welcome back to November! Here is the belated second “In the Journals” post for November 2014. Enjoy! Annual Review of Anthropology On the Verge of Death: Visions of Biological Vulnerability Carlo Caduff This article considers how anthropologists and other social scientists examine biosecurity as an object in the making. It suggests that scholars encountered this object in research projects concerned with questions of global health, capitalism, neoliberalism, humanitarianism, citizenship, science, medicine,…
  • Psychiatry After Ferguson by Jonathan Metzl

    Jonathan Metzl
    15 Dec 2014 | 12:30 am
    What role should mental health care professionals play in helping heal psychical wounds exposed in the aftermath of Ferguson and New York? This question lies at the heart of calls that emerged from within psychiatry, psychology, social work, and other mental health professions over the weeks since grand jury deliberations ended, and protests began, in cities across the country. Professional organizations such as the American Psychological Association convened panels to address the “psychology of improving police-community relations.” The National Association of Social Workers urged “its…
  • In the Journals, December 2014 – Part I by Elizabeth Lewis

    Elizabeth Lewis
    14 Dec 2014 | 8:03 pm
    Here is the first installment of this month’s coverage of current journal articles.  New Genetics and Society Scientific Motherhood, Responsibility, and Hope: Umbilical Cord Blood Banking in South Korea Yeonbo Jeong  This paper explores how concepts of hope, motherhood, responsibility, and science are mobilized and transformed in the marketing strategies of private cord blood banks in South Korea. Cord blood banking provides a useful case study of the “political economy of hope,” which emphasizes future expectations over current utility. In particular, appeals to hope are rendered…
  • Multispecies vs Anthropocene by John Hartigan

    John Hartigan
    12 Dec 2014 | 8:16 am
    An earlier version of this post first appeared on the author’s site, Aesop’s Anthropology. What just happened in Anthropology? In the 2013 annual meeting there were zero abstracts or paper or panel titles featuring the word “Anthropocene”; this year there were 64! Compare that with “multispecies,” which has held steady at between 16-23 invocations after it first made its appearance in the program in 2010.[i] Why the surge of interest? More importantly, given overlapping concerns highlighted by these two keywords, why the sudden prevalence of one over the other? Of the two,…
 
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    Constructing Amusement

  • Constructing Amusement... in transition!

    8 Dec 2014 | 6:52 am
    It's been a busy Fall semester, with an even busier Spring on the horizon. Among many projects in the works, a new slicker website. Watch this space for announcements to come! Until then, follow me on twitter @cheeflo for the latest and greatest in stream-of-consciousness constructions of amusement. Best wishes to all in the final stretch! --FMC
  • Job posting for tenure-track position: Assistant Professor of Advocacy and Social Change

    8 Sep 2014 | 3:26 pm
    At School of Communication at LUC this Fall, the search has begun for someone interested in advocacy and social change with a strong background in digital technology. Details here: Assistant Professor of Advocacy and Social Change The School of Communication at Loyola University Chicago is looking for a tenure track assistant professor specializing in advocacy and social change, with an
  • Exciting research plans for the summer

    19 May 2014 | 9:49 am
    Now on the other side of my first academic year on the Tenure Track, I'm happy to say that the whirring of the machine has not stopped here at Constructing Amusement. Teaching: Courses I've taught in the School of Communication at Loyola University Chicago so far include: Communication and New Media, Game Studies, Critical Ethnography, and Intro to Digital Media (Grad). Ethics: At the Center
  • Announcing April’s SIMLab Brown Bag talk: Investigating a MMOG community through a social justice framework

    31 Mar 2014 | 10:46 am
    Time/Place: April 7th, 2014 @12pm, SIMLab (SOC 016) Speaker: Kelly Bergstrom, York University As with all games, Massively Multiplayer Online Games (MMOGs) are a voluntary leisure activity. However, the voluntary nature of play does not necessarily mean these gameworlds are equally open to all.  To illustrate barriers to participation I present a case study of EVE Online, a space-themed MMOG
  • CFP: The Annual International Symposium on Digital Ethics, Chicago Nov 7th, 2014

    24 Feb 2014 | 8:34 am
    Call for papers The Center for Digital Ethics & Policy at Loyola University Chicago (digitalethics.org) will be holding its 4th Annual International Symposium on Digital Ethics on Nov 7th, 2014. We are looking for papers on digital ethics.  Topics might include privacy, anonymity, griefing, free speech, intellectual property, hacking, scamming, surveillance, information mining, transparency,
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    Visual Anthropology of Japan - 日本映像人類学

  • "Osaka court rules tattoo check on city employees illegal"

    17 Dec 2014 | 9:48 pm
    Sometimes the courts do the right thing... Story from Japan Today, 12/18/14: The Osaka District Court has ruled that Osaka Mayor Toru Hashimoto’s order to check whether municipal office workers had tattoos was illegal and constituted an invasion of privacy. The court handed down the ruling on Wednesday in a damages suit filed by a 56-year-old city bus driver, Tadasu Yasuda, who was transferred to a desk job after he refused to answer questions on whether or not he had a tattoo, Sankei Shimbun reported Thursday. Presiding Judge Kenji Nakagaito invalidated the transfer and ordered the Osaka…
  • "Sea Shepherd files complaint against police to protect Cove Guardian volunteers"

    17 Dec 2014 | 3:27 am
    More about "The Cove" from Japan Today, 12/17/14: A Japanese attorney based in Tokyo has sent a formal letter, on behalf of his client Sea Shepherd Conservation Society, to the Shingu and Wakayama City Police, countering accusations from the police departments that Sea Shepherd’s Cove Guardian volunteers violated Japanese law by following a truck on public roads and taking photographs to document the transportation of dolphins for captivity. Sea Shepherd said in a press release that the formal letter is the beginning of legal action to protect the basic constitutional rights of Sea…
  • 2014 Kanji of the Year: 税 (tax)

    13 Dec 2014 | 8:15 pm
    Photo and text from Japan Today, 12/12/14. The kanji character “zei” (税) meaning “tax,” has been chosen as the character best representing the sentiment and events in Japan in 2014. The Japan Kanji Aptitude Testing Foundation, a Kyoto-based organization that promotes kanji, conducts the survey nationwide every year. The foundation said 167,613 submissions were received this year, with “zei” being the most popular, garnering 8,679 votes. In an event held on Friday, Seihan Mori, the head priest at the world-famous Kiyomizu Temple in Kyoto, drew the character with a large…
  • "Return of signing urged at DisneySea"

    11 Dec 2014 | 1:14 am
    From The Japan News, 12/10/14: At Tokyo DisneySea in Urayasu, Chiba Prefecture, an aquatic show called “The Legend of Mythica,” that was accompanied with a sign language performance came to an end in September. However, there have been growing requests for a restart of the show from hearing-impaired people. DisneySea began introducing the special performance, in which cast members convey the story’s outline and characters’ lines through sign language, in July 2004 with the hope that people with hearing disabilities could fully enjoy the show. The performance was continued even after…
  • Very sad news: Stella Young passes away

    8 Dec 2014 | 10:04 pm
    VAOJ is extremely shocked and saddened by the news of Stella Young passing away on Saturday. Young was a comedian, broadcaster and prominent disability activist who told it like it was. I found her and the term inspiration porn (which she explains very well in her TED Talk) while researching representations of deaf and disabled people. To say she will be missed is a huge understatement. Condolences to her family and friends. News coverage at BBC News: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-30373942
 
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    International Cognition and Culture Institute

  • A cognitive Science of Theology?

    1 Dec 2014 | 9:10 am
    A new, interesting, and original book by Helen De Cruz and Johan De Smedt: A Natural History of Natural Theology: The Cognitive Science of Theology and Philosophy of Religion. MIT Press 2014.Overview: "Questions about the existence and attributes of God form the subject matter of natural theology, which seeks to gain knowledge of the divine by relying on reason and experience of the world. Arguments in natural theology rely largely on intuitions and inferences that seem natural to us, occurring spontaneously—at the sight of a beautiful landscape, perhaps, or in wonderment at the…
  • Applications for PhD studentships in Cognitive Science at CEU, Budapest

    10 Nov 2014 | 4:03 am
    PhD studentships are available for the doctoral program in Cognitive Science at Central European University (CEU), Budapest, Hungary. Application deadline: February 1, 2015.The Department of Cognitive Science at CEU invites applications for doctoral student positions starting in September 2015. This is a research-based training program in human cognition with social cognition and learning as core themes. Research topics include cooperation, communication, social learning, cultural transmission, embodied cognition, joint action, cognitive development, strategic decision-making, problem…
  • Is probabilistic cognition universal?

    9 Nov 2014 | 3:49 am
    An interesting paper by Laura Fontanari, Michel Gonzalez, Giorgio Vallortigara, and Vittorio Girotto: "Probabilistic cognition in two indigenous Mayan groups", forthcoming in PNAS. Preprint available here.Abstract: "Is there a sense of chance shared by all individuals, regardless of their schooling or culture? To test whether the ability to make correct probabilistic evaluations depends on educational and cultural guidance, we investigated probabilistic cognition in preliterate and prenumerate Kaqchikel and K’iche’, two indigenous Mayan groups, living in remote areas…
  • Another look at the two-systems model of mindreading

    25 Oct 2014 | 8:50 am
    Apperly and Butterfill (2009) and Butterfill and Apperly (2013) have proposed a two-systems model of mindreading. According to this model, humans make use of two distinct psychological systems in mindreading tasks. The model rests on three related claims. First of all, the early-developing system, which is taken to be efficient, fast and inflexible, is supposed to explain the positive findings based on spontaneous-response tasks showing that infants can track the contents of others’ false beliefs. The later-developing system, which is taken to be slower, inefficient and…
  • [extended deadline] Berlin Symposium on Reciprocity and Social Cognition

    1 Oct 2014 | 6:05 am
    The deadline for submissions to this symposium has been extended to November the 1st.A symposium on 'Reciprocity and social cognition' organized by Anna Strasser, Stephen Butterfill, Richard Moore, Olle Blomberg will take place at the Berlin School of Mind and Brain, 23–25 March 2015. The call for poster deadline is extended to November 1, 2014.Abstract: 
Reciprocity is a common feature of much social cognition. For example, when two people attend to the same object simultaneously they can do so merely in parallel or jointly; only the latter of which involves…
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    Anthropological Notebook

  • Self with Cantek and naʔAmit

    15 Dec 2014 | 10:43 am
    Over six months since I've posted anything in this blog. Well, I've been busy... Here's the most recent field photo: with baby Cantek and his aunt naʔAmit in Taman Negara last week (photo by Phillip Endicott).
  • Hi-jinks in the lean-to

    14 May 2014 | 6:49 pm
    Sometimes I do wonder if my little friends have a pact among themselves, "Quick, start acting cute! Anthropologist coming!" Batek children in Taman Negara, 2013
  • Weavers of the forest

    14 May 2014 | 5:33 pm
    A mother knows how it's done. naʔSarik (top left) was weaving miniature baskets for her boys, who had demanded to have their own fruit-storing containers. Her mother showed her how to make the bends. Later (left) I found her weaving a mat.
  • At home in Taman Negara

    12 May 2014 | 11:47 am
    Way too busy to do more than post a token few photos. Here's one of an old friend in Taman Negara.
  • More Batek photos

    6 May 2014 | 10:34 pm
    Young couple in a boat, Taman Negara, 2014. The last time you might have seen him, he was laughing heartily on a fallen tree trunk, here. Mother and son, Taman Negara, 2014. I don't have an earlier one for comparison, but the photo below shows how HE was imprinted in my memory for close to 15 years. He is her youngest.   Boy in Taman Negara, 1996. In those days he spent many hours chasing
 
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    Glossographia

  • Advancing Science in Anthropology: a roundtable

    schrisomalis
    13 Dec 2014 | 5:08 pm
    Thanks to those who made it out last Friday to our roundtable at the AAA meetings, ‘Advancing Science in Anthropology: 10 years of SAS’, commemorating 10 years of the Society for Anthropological Sciences, reflecting on our past and future. Of course, I know that many/most of you are either not AAA members or were not able to attend the meetings or had a conflict. Fortunately, Stephen Lyon (@stelynews) and I (schrisomalis) were live-tweeting the event, so we are now glad to be able to share with you the Storify of the whole roundtable, including a summary of all the panelists and…
  • C U N DC? An AAA rundown

    schrisomalis
    2 Dec 2014 | 10:06 am
    To any of my readers who will be in Washington, D.C. this week for the annual American Anthropological meetings, feel free to say hello if you should see me amidst a swarm of funkily-dressed hipsteroids.  (P.S.: I won’t be one of them.)   I’ll be there from tomorrow afternoon right through Sunday afternoon.  If you’re looking to hear me speak, I’m a participant in a roundtable entitled ‘Advancing Science in Anthropology‘ sponsored by the Society for Anthropological Sciences: Friday 12/05, 2:30 – 4:15pm, (Marriott – Wilson B).  I warned my…
  • Review: Wengrow, The origins of monsters

    schrisomalis
    1 Dec 2014 | 7:05 am
    Wengrow, David. 2014. The Origins of Monsters: Image and Cognition in the First Age of Mechanical Reproduction. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press. 160 pp. Reviewed by Molly Hilton (Wayne State University) It is tantalizing to ponder: does Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein saturate popular imaginings because of some inherent human cognitive bias? What is the appeal of griffins, sphinxes and centaurs? Do these fantastical creatures somehow “stick” in the human imagination? In his recent book The Origins of Monsters, David Wengrow examines the archaeological record for an answer…
  • A study in (tickled) pink

    schrisomalis
    30 Nov 2014 | 1:42 pm
    While I don’t normally take requests, an apparent exception to that rule is that when my mom asks me about the origins of a phrase, I must comply.  At least if I know what’s good for me.    Last week, my dear mother asked me for more information on the origins of the phrase tickled pink ‘immensely pleased’.   On that basis, I’m tickled pink to do so.  I assumed there would be an obvious answer online within about 30 seconds.  Not so much. The good news is that the sense is well-agreed-upon: when you tickle someone intensely, their skin pinks up as you…
  • Review: Wynn and Coolidge, How to think like a Neandertal

    schrisomalis
    17 Nov 2014 | 10:32 am
    Wynn, Thomas, and Frederick Coolidge. 2012. How to think like a Neandertal. New York: Oxford University Press.  224 pp. Reviewed by Summar Saad (Wayne State University) With so many false representations and stereotypes floating around about the Neandertals, it’s difficult to know what is fact and what is myth. Armed with minimal archaeological evidence and their knowledge of primates and modern hunter-gatherers, archaeologist Thomas Wynn and psychologist Frederick Coolidge attempt to reconstruct Neandertal cognitive abilities, sometimes very indirectly, based on their diet, hunting…
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    media/anthropology

  • 12. Freedom technologists and protest formulas in Egypt

    John Postill
    20 Dec 2014 | 12:25 am
    John Postill:This is the twelfth instalment in the freedom technologists series. Originally posted on CONNECTED in CAIRO: What can formulaic expression tell us about media and social change? For one thing, to study technology users rather than technologies, says John Postill in a recent article. There’s a new article out from John Postill in the latest issue of Convergence that may be relevant to the study of the roles digital media played (and continue to play) in the Egyptian revolution. John’s project is to study the relationship between Internet activism and post-2008 protest…
  • Aggregation vs. networking: a conversation between Paolo Gerbaudo and Jeff Juris

    John Postill
    18 Dec 2014 | 10:29 pm
    These are the first few exchanges of an ongoing public conversation between the social movements scholars Paolo Gerbaudo and Jeff Juris, with Sasha Constanza-Shock and myself chipping in as required. It all started on Twitter a couple of days ago, but we then decided to move the conversation to a much roomier platform: Pirate Pad. [JP update 19 Dec 2014. For readers new to this topic, here is the abstract of Juris, J. S. (2012). Reflections on# Occupy Everywhere: Social media, public space, and emerging logics of aggregation. American Ethnologist, 39(2), 259-279. This article explores the…
  • How information volunteers solve communicative issues during a disaster

    John Postill
    18 Dec 2014 | 2:54 pm
    Volunteers play with children at a disaster refugee centre near Yogyakarta, in Indonesia. Photo by Eko Suprati. This is an invited post from Kurniawan Adi Saputro (@ksaputro) who is about to complete his PhD at Sheffield Hallam University, UK. His thesis is a study of media audiences’ engagement in disaster response. He currently teaches at the Indonesia Institute of the Arts, in Yogyakarta. The importance of ‘volunteer and technical communities’ (Meier, 2013) in today’s disaster response cannot be overstated. One of their key contributions is to help disaster-affected communities…
  • The making of a democratic citizenship in Spain, 1977-2004

    John Postill
    16 Dec 2014 | 11:02 pm
    Brief notes on Benedicto, J. (2006). La construcción de la ciudadanía democrática en España (1977-2004): de la institucionalización a las prácticas. Revista española de investigaciones sociológicas, 114(1), 103-136. English abstract This article examines the historical process of construction of citizenship in Spain from the beginning of the democratic experience up to the last general elections. This historical process can only be understood properly if we analyse its close relationship with the development of democratic culture and the huge modernization of Spanish social life. The…
  • 11. Monitory democracy in an age of media abundance

    John Postill
    11 Dec 2014 | 5:28 am
    Public accountability campaigns are on the rise worldwide, fuelled by a digital media bonanza. IN 2009 John Keane, the Australian political theorist, published a book titled The Life and Death of Democracy. The book argues that a new political form has spread around the world since 1945: ‘monitory democracy’. This is the idea that decision-makers in all spheres of society – including government, the private sector and civil society – are subject to ever-increasing levels of public scrutiny. Such scrutiny can be done in the name of ‘the public’, ‘public accountability’,…
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    American Journal of Physical Anthropology

  • Angular momentum and arboreal stability in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus)

    Brad A. Chadwell, Jesse W. Young
    18 Dec 2014 | 10:50 pm
    ABSTRACT Despite the importance that concepts of arboreal stability have in theories of primate locomotor evolution, we currently lack measures of balance performance during primate locomotion. We provide the first quantitative data on locomotor stability in an arboreal primate, the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), predicting that primates should maximize arboreal stability by minimizing side-to-side angular momentum about the support (i.e., Lsup). If net Lsup becomes excessive, the animal will be unable to arrest its angular movement and will fall. Using a novel, highly integrative…
  • Encyclopedia of Caribbean Archeology. Edited by Basil A. Reid and R. Grant Gilmore, III. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida. 2014. 383 pp. ISBN-978-0-8130-4420-0

    Todd M. Ahlman
    18 Dec 2014 | 10:49 pm
  • Spatial patterning of bone stiffness in the anterior mandibular corpus of Macaca fascicularis: Implications for models of bone adaptation

    David J. Daegling, Michael C. Granatosky, W. Scott McGraw
    17 Dec 2014 | 7:53 pm
    ABSTRACT Elastic modulus of bone from the anterior mandibular corpus was determined via microindentation in a mixed-sex ontogenetic sample (N = 14) of Macaca fascicularis. This investigation focused on the hypothesis that material heterogeneity in the macaque mandibular symphysis—provided an accounting of age and sex variation—is explicable as a means to homogenize strains in this region. Experimental data and theoretical models of masticatory loading indicate that in the absence of material compensation, large strain gradients exist in the anterior mandibular corpus of macaques,…
  • Relationships of maternal and paternal anthropometry with neonatal body size, proportions and adiposity in an Australian cohort

    Emma Pomeroy, Jonathan C.K. Wells, Tim J. Cole, Michael O'Callaghan, Jay T. Stock
    12 Dec 2014 | 9:08 pm
    ABSTRACT The patterns of association between maternal or paternal and neonatal phenotype may offer insight into how neonatal characteristics are shaped by evolutionary processes, such as conflicting parental interests in fetal investment and obstetric constraints. Paternal interests are theoretically served by maximizing fetal growth, and maternal interests by managing investment in current and future offspring, but whether paternal and maternal influences act on different components of overall size is unknown. We tested whether parents' prepregnancy height and body mass index (BMI) were…
  • Low mineral density of a weight-bearing bone among adult women in a high fertility population

    Jonathan Stieglitz, Bret A. Beheim, Benjamin C. Trumble, Felicia C. Madimenos, Hillard Kaplan, Michael Gurven
    8 Dec 2014 | 8:49 pm
    ABSTRACT Evolutionary theories of aging posit that greater reproductive effort causes somatic decline given a fundamental trade-off between investing energy in reproduction and repair. Few studies in high fertility human populations support this hypothesis, and problems of phenotypic correlation can obscure the expected trade-off between reproduction and somatic condition. This cross-sectional study investigates whether greater reproductive effort is associated with reduced calcaneal bone mineral density (BMD) among female Tsimane forager-farmers of lowland Bolivia. We also investigate…
 
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    Anthropogenesis

  • Human Kinship Systems and Human Origins: A Powwow Highway from AAA to AAPA Meetings

    German Dziebel
    19 Dec 2014 | 4:43 pm
    I recently returned from the American Anthropological Association Meetings in Washington DC where I presented a paper on kinship, enjoyed the company of other members of the interdisciplinary “Kinship Circle” group led by Dwight Read and Fadwa El-Guindi, socialized with my former colleagues at the Stanford University Department of Anthropology including Bill Durham and Sylvia Yanagisako, listened to a sizzling talk by Bruno Latour on the arrival of Anthropocene and topped it off with an always-intense, long and rewarding conversation with Tad Schurr about the peopling of the…
  • The Solutrean Hypothesis Meets Mainstream Science: A False Response to a Real Problem vs. A Real Response to a False Problem

    German Dziebel
    29 Nov 2014 | 12:19 am
    World Archaeology 46, no. 5 (2014): 752-774. DOI: 10.1080/00438243.2014.966273 Solutrean Hypothesis: Genetics, the Mammoth in the Room Stephen Oppenheimer, Bruce Bradley, and Dennis Stanford. Abstract The Solutrean hypothesis for the origin of the Clovis archaeological culture contends that people came from south-western Europe to North America during the Last Glacial Maximum. This hypothesis has received numerous critiques, but little objective testing, either of cultural or genetic evidence. We contest the assertion that there is NO genetic evidence to support this hypothesis, and detail…
  • Ancient Kostenki 14 (Markina Gora) DNA: A Glimpse into a Population on Its Way from America to Africa

    German Dziebel
    9 Nov 2014 | 9:41 pm
    Science DOI: 10.1126/science.aaa0114 Genomic Structure in Europeans Dating Back at Least 36,200 Years Andaine Seguin-Orlando, Thorfinn S. Korneliussen, Martin Sikora, Anna-Sapfo Malaspinas, Andrea Manica, Ida Moltke, Anders Albrechtsen, Amy Ko, Ashot Margaryan, Vyacheslav Moiseyev, Ted Goebel, Michael Westaway, David Lambert, Valeri Khartanovich, Jeffrey D. Wall, Philip R. Nigst, Robert A. Foley, Marta Mirazon Lahr, Rasmus Nielsen, Ludovic Orlando, and Eske Willerslev. The origin of contemporary Europeans remains contentious. We obtain a genome sequence from Kostenki 14 in European Russia…
  • Kunstkamera: News from Around the Web

    German Dziebel
    5 Nov 2014 | 10:32 am
    1. Patagonian Monsters. A new website run by Argentina-based Austin Whittall is a wealth of sharp analyses of human genetic variation from an intellectual point of view that’s close to out-of-America II. Whittall is critical of the mainstream interpretations of human genetic variation and explores the possibility of an early peopling of the Americas by Neandertals and /or Homo erectus and a back migration from America to Asia (here and here).The blog’s name is the reverse from the objective, formal and dispassionate content that the professional engineer Whittall produces…
  • Ancient Ust’-Ishim DNA as Seen From the Americas

    German Dziebel
    23 Oct 2014 | 12:02 pm
    Nature 514, 445–449 (23 October 2014) doi:10.1038/nature13810 Genome sequence of a 45,000-year-old modern human from western Siberia Qiaomei Fu, Heng Li, Priya Moorjani, Flora Jay, Sergey M. Slepchenko, Aleksei A. Bondarev, Philip L. F. Johnson, Ayinuer Aximu-Petri, Kay Prufer, Cesare de Filippo, Matthias Meyer, Nicolas Zwyns, Domingo C. Salazar-Garcıa, Yaroslav V. Kuzmin, Susan G. Keates, Pavel A. Kosintsev, Dmitry I. Razhev, Michael P. Richards, Nikolai V. Peristov, Michael Lachmann, Katerina Douka, Thomas F. G. Higham, Montgomery Slatkin, Jean-Jacques Hublin, David Reich, Janet…
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    BOAS Network

  • Dr. John Johnson: Santa Barbara Symposium on Human Origins II

    BOAS
    15 Dec 2014 | 1:45 pm
    BOAS Network presents: Santa Barbara Symposium on Human Origins II. Dr. John Johnson, Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History, presenting “Arlington Springs: The Settlement of North America from the perspective of Santa Barbara.” Day Two: Public Lectures, Lobero Theatre, September 13, 2014.
  • Dr. Greger Larson: Santa Barbara Symposium on Human Origins II

    BOAS
    15 Dec 2014 | 12:59 pm
    BOAS Network presents: Santa Barbara Symposium on Human Origins II. Day Two: Public Lectures with Dr. Greger Larson, University of Oxford, “Bodies in Motion: Understanding the relation between Migration and Hybridization.”
  • Beatriz Mejia Krumbein Mi Tiempo, Mein Raum, My Map

    BOAS
    10 Dec 2014 | 2:53 pm
    In “ Mi Tiempo, Mein Raum, My Map My Map” Beatriz Mejia-Krumbien,uses the names of each person she recalls from Colombia, Mexico, Germany and the US as the basis of performance that integrates drawings, video, dance and song. She reflects on what Susan Ossman calls the “poetics of attachment.” From the Moving Matters Traveling Workshop, First Meeting, Culver Center for the Arts, Riverside, California, May 2013. The Moving Matters Traveling Workshop draws together artists, musicians, actors and creative writers to explore the experience of serial migration. As the workshop moves across…
  • Moving Matters: The Art of Serial Migration

    BOAS
    10 Dec 2014 | 2:31 pm
    Part of the Moving Matters Traveling Workshop drawing together artists, musicians, actors and creative writers to explore the experience of serial migration. As the workshop moves across the world our artworks evolve in galleries, public squares, museums and theaters. This process of creation recalls the way we ourselves have developed as we have settled in one country after another. Do people whose lives include several countries loose all sense of belonging ? Do they feel uprooted or do each of their homes become a part of them? Can a life story be told in several languages at once? How are…
  • On the Line: A Second Look

    BOAS
    10 Dec 2014 | 2:14 pm
    An Exhibition combining art, memory and anthropology. On the Line leads us to recall fresh laundry’s associations with purity, intimacy and propriety and to question which social bindings are loosened when the fresh scent and delicate touch of sheets on the line become just a memory. Exhibition/ Seminar Brandstater Gallery March 2013. Led by Dr. Susan Ossman
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