Anthropology

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  • Ice age Europeans on the brink of extinction

    Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog
    Dienekes
    30 Mar 2015 | 5:58 am
    Ice-age Europeans roamed in small bands of fewer than 30, on brink of extinctionIn some cases, small bands of potentially as few as 20 to 30 people could have been moving over very large areas, over the whole of Europe as a single territory, according to Professor Ron Pinhasi, principal investigator on the EU-funded ADNABIOARC project. This demographic model is based on new evidence that suggests populations were much smaller than is generally thought to be a stable size for healthy reproduction, usually around 500 people. Such small groupings may have led to reduced fitness and even…
  • Journal of the Anthropological Society of Oxford: Open Access and Relevant

    Savage Minds
    Rex
    25 Mar 2015 | 12:42 pm
    This week’s open access spotlight falls on the Journal of the Anthropological Society of Oxford. A while ago I gave mad shouts out to Cambridge Anthropology when it was resurrected and published by Berghahn.  So it seems only fair to showcase the Journal of the Anthropological Society of Oxford (JASO) for making the decision to stay small, home-brewed, and open. It can be a bit confusing navigating around JASO’s site, but it’s definitely worth your while. Their latest issue is on sexual harassment in the field, a topic that has been the topic of increasing attention in…
  • A Place for Poor People? Peri-Urban Land & “Development” in Lesotho

    Savage Minds
    Julian Yates
    27 Mar 2015 | 11:57 am
    This post was contributed by Charles Fogelman, and is part of a series on ‘Rending land investible‘, guest edited by Jenny E Goldstein and Julian S Yates. Charles Fogelman is a Research Fellow with the Cultures of Law in Global Contexts Project and a Ph.D. candidate with the Department of Geography and GIS at the University of Illinois. He tweets at @charlesfogelman. The title of this piece comes from a conversation I had with a senior unelected official for the city of Maseru, the capital of Lesotho. As he described the planned sprawling 18-hole golf course in a village on the outskirts…
  • With roles in major discoveries, GW's anthropology researchers find success

    anthropology - Yahoo News Search Results
    27 Mar 2015 | 2:16 pm
    GW’s digging for success. The University’s anthropology department and its researchers have played leading roles in major, recent discoveries in the archaeological field, which faculty say has come as funding and hiring for the department has increased over the past few years.
  • Developmental defects in the teeth of three wild chimpanzees from the Taï forest

    American Journal of Physical Anthropology
    Tanya M. Smith, Christophe Boesch
    27 Mar 2015 | 4:25 am
    ABSTRACT Objectives:Developmental defects in teeth (accentuated lines and hypoplasias) have played a critical role in studies of childhood disease, nutrition, weaning, environmental variation, and early mortality. While these enigmatic structures have been lauded for their potential insights into human evolution, few studies have examined defects in individuals of known histories. Materials and Methods:Here we document defects in the molars of three wild juvenile chimpanzees from the Taï forest (Pan troglodytes verus) and compare them with behavioral, epidemiological, and environmental…
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    anthropology - Yahoo News Search Results

  • With roles in major discoveries, GW's anthropology researchers find success

    27 Mar 2015 | 2:16 pm
    GW’s digging for success. The University’s anthropology department and its researchers have played leading roles in major, recent discoveries in the archaeological field, which faculty say has come as funding and hiring for the department has increased over the past few years.
  • Awards and Honors

    25 Mar 2015 | 9:49 am
    Derick Fay, professor of anthropology,is the recipient of Public Anthropology's Paul Farmer Global Citizenship Award. It honors the world's leading medical humanitarians and anthropologists in the 21st century. Less than 1 percent of the faculty teaching anthropology courses across North America receive this award, and Fay is recognized for his exceptional participation in the center's Community ...
  • The challenges for anthropologists when they're the expert in the courtroom

    24 Mar 2015 | 7:39 am
    A national presentation and discussion will examine the intellectual, practical and ethical challenges for anthropologists when they're hired to serve as expert witnesses.
  • Society for Applied Anthropology celebrates social science theory

    22 Mar 2015 | 9:03 pm
    Over the next five days, 1,800 members of the Society for Applied Anthropology won’t just be listening to academic presentations in a hotel, they’ll also be exploring the Carrie Furnace, the University of Pittsburgh’s Nationality Rooms and a fracking site, among other destinations, to learn more about the community that will host their 75th annual conference.
  • Anthropology society hopes to help curb violence in Pittsburgh

    21 Mar 2015 | 5:01 pm
    Changing the direction of gunshot victims is one way to reduce violence in Pittsburgh, two experts say. “We look at this as a teachable moment ...
 
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    Anthropology.net

  • 500,000-Year-Old Tools Still Contain Traces Of Animal Fat

    Kambiz Kamrani
    21 Mar 2015 | 6:25 am
    The flint biface. The blue dots represent fatty residue. The discovery of a 500,000 year old flint biface hand axe and a scraper at Revadim, in southern Israel, with traces of animal fat as well as an elephant rib with cut marks indicates these early humans consumed big game, “The biface and scraper show well-preserved and clear use-wear traces, including both edge removals and polishes. The biface use traces indicate the processing of medium-hard material throughout transversal motions, related probably to hide scraping. In the case of the scraper, the traces shows attributes…
  • 130,000 Year Old Eagle Claw Jewelry From Krapina Neandertals

    Kambiz Kamrani
    11 Mar 2015 | 3:27 pm
    An image of white-tailed eagle talons from the Krapina Neandertal site in present-day Croatia, dating to approximately 130,000 years ago, may be part of a jewelry assemblage.Credit: Luka Mjeda, Zagreb; CC-BY Krapina Neandertals may have manipulated white-tailed eagle talons to make jewelry 130,000 years ago, before the appearance of modern human in Europe, according to a study published March 11, 2015 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by David Frayer from University of Kansas and colleagues from Croatia.Filed under: Archaeology Tagged: Archaeology, art, croatia, Jewelry, krapina, neandertal
  • The genus Homo is older than thought…

    Kambiz Kamrani
    4 Mar 2015 | 4:48 pm
    Another close-up view of the Homo mandible, LD350-1, shown just steps from where Arizona State University graduate student Chalachew Seyoum from Ethiopia spotted it. The scientists involved in the discovery aren’t sure if the fossil belongs to a new species or to a known, extinct human species, such as Homo habilis. They plan to learn more about the fossil before making that decision and giving it a name. (Photo credit: Kaye Reed) A 2.8-million-year-old mandible with five teeth discovered atop a hill in Ledi-Geraru, Ethiopia was published today in the journal Science. The mandible…
  • Mapping Ötzi’s Tattoos

    Kambiz Kamrani
    30 Jan 2015 | 9:24 pm
    A closer look at some of Iceman’s tattoos. (Credit: Marco Samadelli) All 62 of Ötzi’s tattoos have been mapped. They are mostly located over joint spaces and are thought to play a therapeutic role given he suffered from degenerative joint disease. We will never know if these were tattoos served as markers for therapy, like acupuncture, or they were treatment themselves. The full text publication can be found in the Journal of Cultural Heritage.Filed under: Archaeology, Cultural Anthropology Tagged: Ötzi, Cultural Anthropology, culture, iceman, medical anthropology, tattoo, tattoos
  • Penghu 1 – A New East Asian Fossil Hominid

    Kambiz Kamrani
    30 Jan 2015 | 8:43 pm
    The recovered jawbone of Penghu 1 reveals it belonged to a new species with large teeth. Y. KAIFU Penghu 1 is a mandible with an interesting discovery; Taiwanese fishermen dredged up the jawbone off the coast of Penghu Channel. The fishermen sold it to a local antique shop, where collector Kun-Yu Tsai purchased and donated it to his collection to the National Museum of Natural Science in Taiwan. Location of Penghu-1 Tentative dates on this specimen are about 200,000 years old and the mandible is unlike other hominids. The jaw is short and wide with large dentition, unlike sapiens, erectus,…
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    Savage Minds

  • Fast Writing: Ethnography in the Digital Age

    Carole McGranahan
    30 Mar 2015 | 5:59 am
    [Savage Minds is pleased to run this essay by guest author Yarimar Bonilla as part of our Writer’s Workshop Series. Yarimar is Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Caribbean Studies at Rutgers University. She is the author of Non-Sovereign Futures: French Caribbean Politics in the Wake of Disenchantment (University of Chicago Press, forthcoming Fall 2015) and has written broadly about social movements, historical imaginaries, and questions of sovereignty in the Caribbean. She is currently a fellow in the History Design Studio at Harvard University where she is working on a digital…
  • Around the Web Digest: Week of March 22

    Rebecca Nelson
    29 Mar 2015 | 7:32 am
    This week I’m trying to spread the love to some blogs I haven’t featured in the past. Please, if you know of any good blogs, particularly physical/biological anthropology blogs, send them my way at rebecca.nelson.jacobs@gmail.com. If you haven’t done the Savage Minds Reader Survey yet, don’t fret! There’s still time to get in the running for the Awesome Stuff giveaway. DigVentures describes a genetic mapping study that found a shocking lack of Viking DNA in the UK:  Not So Vicious Invaders? What Genetic Mapping Tells Us About Our Past  Similarly, this post…
  • A Place for Poor People? Peri-Urban Land & “Development” in Lesotho

    Julian Yates
    27 Mar 2015 | 11:57 am
    This post was contributed by Charles Fogelman, and is part of a series on ‘Rending land investible‘, guest edited by Jenny E Goldstein and Julian S Yates. Charles Fogelman is a Research Fellow with the Cultures of Law in Global Contexts Project and a Ph.D. candidate with the Department of Geography and GIS at the University of Illinois. He tweets at @charlesfogelman. The title of this piece comes from a conversation I had with a senior unelected official for the city of Maseru, the capital of Lesotho. As he described the planned sprawling 18-hole golf course in a village on the outskirts…
  • Journal of the Anthropological Society of Oxford: Open Access and Relevant

    Rex
    25 Mar 2015 | 12:42 pm
    This week’s open access spotlight falls on the Journal of the Anthropological Society of Oxford. A while ago I gave mad shouts out to Cambridge Anthropology when it was resurrected and published by Berghahn.  So it seems only fair to showcase the Journal of the Anthropological Society of Oxford (JASO) for making the decision to stay small, home-brewed, and open. It can be a bit confusing navigating around JASO’s site, but it’s definitely worth your while. Their latest issue is on sexual harassment in the field, a topic that has been the topic of increasing attention in…
  • Can’t Get There from Here? Writing Place and Moving Narratives

    Carole McGranahan
    22 Mar 2015 | 9:59 pm
    [Savage Minds is pleased to run this essay by guest author Sarah Besky as part of our Writer’s Workshop Series. Sarah is Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology and the School of Natural Resources and Environment and a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Michigan Society of Fellows at the University of Michigan. Starting in Fall 2015, she will be Assistant Professor of Anthropology and International and Public Affairs at Brown University. Sarah specializes in the study of nature, capitalism, and labor in South Asia and the Himalayas. She is the author of The Darjeeling Distinction:…
 
 
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    Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog

  • Ice age Europeans on the brink of extinction

    Dienekes
    30 Mar 2015 | 5:58 am
    Ice-age Europeans roamed in small bands of fewer than 30, on brink of extinctionIn some cases, small bands of potentially as few as 20 to 30 people could have been moving over very large areas, over the whole of Europe as a single territory, according to Professor Ron Pinhasi, principal investigator on the EU-funded ADNABIOARC project. This demographic model is based on new evidence that suggests populations were much smaller than is generally thought to be a stable size for healthy reproduction, usually around 500 people. Such small groupings may have led to reduced fitness and even…
  • Afanasievo, Okunev, Andronovo, Sintashta DNA?

    Dienekes
    28 Mar 2015 | 12:00 am
    A reader alerts me to this article in Russian, but you can use Google Translate to get the gist of it. Some interesting bits (note that "pit"=Yamna): I can not ignore the question I now have is particularly exciting - the origin of the Indo-Europeans. Community Indo-Europeists animatedly discussing just appeared as a preprint work of David Raika and his colleagues discovered by studying the genomes of people Neolithic and Bronze Age that a decisive influence on the genetic landscape of Europe has had a migration of people pit culture to the north and west in the middle of the III…
  • Icelanders galore

    Dienekes
    25 Mar 2015 | 1:03 pm
    A set of four papers in Nature Genetics today. All open access. Of interest from the Y-chromosome paper:When this rate was applied to estimate the TMRCA between two Y chromosomes that encompass the oldest known patrilineal bifurcation between any humans (representing haplogroups A00 and A0, with 75 derived mutational differences in 180 kb of XDG sequence)19, we obtained a maximum-likelihood estimate21 of 239,000 years ago and a 95% CI of 188,000–296,000 years ago (174,000–321,000 years ago when incorporating the 95% CI of our mutation rate).This seems similar to the 254kya estimated…
  • Long Live the 25th March 1821

    Dienekes
    25 Mar 2015 | 6:39 am
  • Ancient mtDNA from cis-Baikal area

    Dienekes
    21 Mar 2015 | 12:00 am
    Russian Journal of Genetics: Applied ResearchJanuary 2015, Volume 5, Issue 1, pp 26-32 Mitochondrial DNA diversity in the gene pool of the Neolithic and Early Bronze Age Cisbaikalian human population R. O. Trapezov, A. S. Pilipenko, V. I. Molodin This paper presents the results of a study of a mitochondrial DNA sample (N = 15) from the remains of representatives of the Neolithic and Early Bronze Age (VI–III millennia BC) Cisbaikalian human population. It was found that the mitochondrial gene pool of the ancient population under study contains lineages of East Eurasian haplogroups D, G2a C,…
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    Material World

  • World Museums: Geographies and Genealogies

    Haidy Geismar
    26 Mar 2015 | 2:18 am
    Via Felix Driver, Royal Holloway May 19, 2015 World Museums: Geographies and Genealogies  Institute of Historical Research, Senate House, 5.15pm In conversation: Anthony Shelton, Director of the Museum of Anthropology and Professor of Anthropology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada Annie E. Coombes, Professor of Material and Visual Culture & Director of the Peltz Gallery, Birkbeck, University of London. This HARC Dialogues event will focus on the idea of the world museum, as expressed originally in the concept of the universal or encyclopaedic museum, and reinvented for…
  • Crowd-sourcing and Crowd-funding our human past

    Haidy Geismar
    21 Mar 2015 | 7:51 am
    The MicroPasts project, an AHRC collaborative UCL-British Museum Project, uses web-based technologies to foster collaborations between researchers based in higher education and heritage institutions and members of the public to study the human past. Together, the project team has created new open archaeological data via crowdsourcing (crowdsourced.micropasts.org) and arranged the micro-financing of community archaeology and community history projects (crowdfunded.micropasts.org). The MicroPasts end of first phase funding conference will be held at the Royal Geographical Society on the 31st…
  • Knyttan and the question of design autonomy

    Haidy Geismar
    20 Mar 2015 | 2:47 am
    Lydia Maria Arantes | Visiting Researcher, Anthropology, UCL   source: www.somersethouse.org.uk/visual-arts/knyttan-factory-of-the-future ]   Have you ever wanted to design your own scarf, jumper or even tie, but can’t knit?‘ read the first sentence on the Somerset House website introducting Knyttan – Factory of the Future , currently based in the New Wing. Despite already knowing how to knit, I was nonetheless interested to what extent visitors of Knyttan would be granted involvement in the design process. Having been doing research on (hand) knitting for the past…
  • Cyclone Pam – Support Vanuatu

    Haidy Geismar
    18 Mar 2015 | 2:15 am
    Haidy Geismar, UCL As I’m sure you are all aware, last week Vanuatu was devastated by Cyclone Pam, battering the country with winds of over 270 mph. The storm knocked out the country’s telecommunications and transport infrastructure and now, just a few days later, it is estimated that more then 70% of the population are left homeless, without adequate drinking water, and without food. The long term prospects for food security are also bad as most of the garden crops that people live off have been destroyed. President Baldwin Lonsdale has announced that the storm had “wiped…
  • Some current job opportunities for those with material culture interests:

    Haidy Geismar
    14 Mar 2015 | 3:45 am
    Two Lecturers in Art Gallery and Museum Studies at the  University of Leicester And: Departmental Lecturer in Visual, Material and Museum Anthropology, Oxford University Applications are invited for a Departmental Lecturer in Visual, Material and Museum Anthropology (VMMA) effective from 14 September 2015 to 30 June 2016. The post is part time (18.75 hours per week) based at the School of Anthropology, Banbury Road, Oxford. The role is needed for a limited time to provide cover for the teaching and administrative commitments of Professor Clare Harris who holds a Leverhulme Fellowship for…
 
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    A Hot Cup of Joe

  • Sumerians in Bolivia? Probably not.

    Carl Feagans
    22 Mar 2015 | 10:59 pm
    I subscribe to a lot of archaeology related feeds on social media and one of the memes going around last week included one with the title, “3 ‘Forbidden Archaeology’ Discoveries That Will Rock Your Boat.” Let me set the record straight: it’s hard to rock a boat that already sank. First of the three was something called the Fuente Magna Bowl, a stone bowl that surfaced in the 1950s with both South American motifs and, what is alleged, to be Sumerian text. Such an artifact would be very significant and among the most note-worthy finds of the human past if: 1) it…
  • Pseudoarchaeology and Elongated Skulls

    Carl Feagans
    25 Jan 2015 | 10:40 pm
    Drawing of a figurine from Tiesler (2014, p. 81) that depicts a head splint used to shape an infant’s skull. Elongated skulls of ancient people like the Peruvians have long been a source of mystery and fascination, particularly for significance-junkies that find aliens wherever they can. The last Indiana Jones movie didn’t help matters either. Along that line, somebody sent me a link to a website that has a different view of cranial deformation than that of science knowing that I’ve previously written on the topic and wondered what I thought. So I thought I’d share my…
  • Vampires in the Archaeological Record?

    Carl Feagans
    13 May 2014 | 6:06 pm
    No. Not really. But the folks of Kamien Pomorski in northwestern Poland thought so in the 16th century. You can’t get blood from a rock. Find the story and at least one more photo at Kamienski.info. The bones aren’t of a real vampire, of course, but the belief in vampires was a very real phenomenon in 16th century Europe. Probable origins of the belief include the nature of corpses as the go through early stages of decay. The skin tightens and shrinks, giving the appearance of beard growth or growing fingernails. It isn’t the hair or nails that grow out, rather the skin…
  • Pseudoarchaeology: 3 Million Year Old Modern Man

    Carl Feagans
    30 Apr 2014 | 10:51 pm
    A woo-related post ended up on one of the Rock Art pages I subscribe to on FaceBook, with the author claiming a pebble exhibiting pareidolic features to be a figure carved from stone by “modern man” more than 3 million years ago. The FB post linked to this WordPress article on “TreasureBusiness.org,” the blog of a self-styled digger and treasure seeker that calls himself the “commander.” -I know right? The author keeps repeating, interestingly enough, that it is commonly held that “modern man” is between 6000-34000 years old. He doesn’t…
  • Recording Rock Art: Using DStretch

    Carl Feagans
    27 Apr 2014 | 9:47 pm
    As you might imagine, a large part of recording rock art involves the use of photography. And among the tools used by those recording and analyzing images both in the field and in the lab is software that digitally enhances photographs to make the rock art clearer or even to reveal elements that are no longer visible to the naked eye due to erosion and weathering. The software of choice is increasingly a small plugin for a freely available Java-based image processing application called ImageJ. The plugin is DStretch, developed by Jon Harman. To run the plugin, you simply drop the .zip file…
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    Kimberly Christian's Garcinia Cambogia

  • Top 5 Fish Oil Supplements as Recommended by AlivebyNature.com

    admin
    29 Mar 2015 | 12:10 pm
    Glutamine is easily the most the most abundant amino acids in requires. The amount of the usb ports that you have now in method is mainly stored inside your skeletal muscles and plasma television. The rest with it is seen in your lungs which will be the it is originally done. It is released during throughout the stress, as an example during a hardcore workout. It’s during this period that is necessary to supplement extra sources of glutamine for the body can’t synthesize consequently it fulfill those demands. Never attend a party feeling hungry. Bring a snack to work and show it…
  • Pure Forloskin: How To Buy It

    admin
    15 Dec 2014 | 11:43 am
    Weight Loss is certainly an obsession for millions. What is the best way to shed pounds? How can I lose weight quickly? What method can help me lose surplus weight? These burning questions keep many of us awake at nighttime. This article will explore some of probably the most frequently asked questions associated with reduction. For most of us, we need to have answers to our questions before deciding which approach will yield the outcomes. The following thing can need test is consume a reasonable diet while choosing HCA. Eating appropriate portions of healthier foodstuffs results in a steady…
  • Forloskin – Your Lesser Known Fat Burning Solultion

    admin
    2 Dec 2014 | 2:50 pm
    Being in your teens is demanding. Not only you have to manage your busy study schedule, you have to cope having a changing body as well as raging hormones which cause damage to your skin. I remember when I was a teenager, method I look is the ideal concern for me. When my acne problems started, I remember being feeling down and depressed most of the time. The most dreaded time is always attend any social functionings. My time was mostly consumed with how help reduce my teenage acne easily. If a person trying to shed weight, pests away . an approach to fit exercise seamlessly towards your…
  • Facts About alivebynature Weight-Loss Product

    admin
    11 Nov 2014 | 3:15 pm
    Eczema is actually definitely an inflammation of the skin wherein the patches of skin may be red, itchy and slough off. The cause of this disease is unknown as it can certainly occur on any part of the body but is typically found on an arms, knees, elbows and knees. For anybody who is looking for natural treating of eczema, it can be be serious. But some in the most common places you’re able to find things for these natural remedies, are place like the grocery store, vitamin stores such as alivebynature, other sorts of stores. Applying witch hazel towards affected area a few times a day…
  • 3 Raw Food Diet Secrets!

    admin
    24 Oct 2014 | 3:11 pm
    When Janet Lindvall sat in front of her computer, food obvious that she needed lower belly fat. It was an ugly sight to see rolls of fat bulging out from her ab. Fact 9: Metabolic disorders will cause weight realize. Diabetes and hypo thyroid are the most widespread. You need to be medically examined if believe any hang ups. As the cat ages, toxin damage occurs and the best way to make plant based protein supplement cat healthy is by supplying all of them herbs and anti-oxidants like quercitin and rutin sustain their energy. So do you want to get large, beautiful muscles? A person wish…
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    Somatosphere

  • Jenell Johnson’s American Lobotomy: A Rhetorical History by Emma Bedor

    Emma Bedor
    30 Mar 2015 | 7:35 am
    American Lobotomy: A Rhetorical History by Jenell Johnson University of Michigan Press, 2014, 240 pages.   Jenell Johnson’s 2014 book American Lobotomy: A Rhetorical History provides an accessible and thoroughly enjoyable look at how an infamous medical procedure – the lobotomy – developed, was administered, initially applauded, ultimately loathed, and has had an enduring and profound impact upon medicalization of the mind and public perceptions of medical authority. Johnson expertly intertwines history and detailed biographical information from and about medical professionals and…
  • Experimental anthropology in the making: a conversation with Andreas Roepstorff by Des Fitzgerald

    Des Fitzgerald
    25 Mar 2015 | 6:56 am
    Andreas Roepstorff is Professor in Anthropology at Aarhus University in Denmark, where he is also Director of the Interacting Minds Centre. Since the early 2000s, he has pursued an intensely interdisciplinary and collaborative research-programme at the intersections of anthropology, science and technology studies, and cognitive neuroscience – while also using his ethnographic training to reflect back on this his own methods. Often cited as one of the early figures in what is today called ‘neuroanthropology,’ Andreas’s major research interests circle around forms of cooperation and…
  • William Connolly’s The Fragility of Things by Allegra Giovine

    Allegra Giovine
    17 Mar 2015 | 2:45 pm
    The Fragility of Things: Self-organizing Processes, Neoliberal Fantasies, and Democratic Activism by William E. Connolly Duke University Press, 2013, 256 pages.   In The Fragility of Things: Self-organizing Processes, Neoliberal Fantasies, and Democratic Activism (2013), political theorist William Connolly delivers us into a chaotic world: “a world of becoming in which multiple force fields set on different tiers of chronotime periodically collide or coalesce to foment a new danger, risk, or possibility” (138). This is a volatile world that is constantly in motion, a world that gives…
  • Book Forum – Bhrigupati Singh’s Poverty and the Quest for Life by Todd Meyers

    Todd Meyers
    13 Mar 2015 | 7:24 am
      In this next installment of our book forum series, Naveeda Khan has organized a tremendously engaging and challenging set of commentaries on Bhrigupati Singh’s forthcoming book, Poverty and the Quest for Life (Chicago, 2015).  The currents that run between these pieces do not need channeled by a long preface – as will become apparent, these passages already run deep.  We hope you enjoy an exceptional set of commentaries and Bhrigu’s reply.   Introduction: An-other Ethnography Naveeda Khan Johns Hopkins University   Comments on Bhrigupati Singh’s Poverty and…
  • Bio-ethnography, a view from philosophy by Vivette García Deister

    Vivette García Deister
    12 Mar 2015 | 4:19 pm
    Full frontal disclosure: I am not an anthropologist (by training). But my work is informed by historical research, ethnographic methods, and critical anthropology of science. And as someone who has –Developmental Systems Theory willing- taken on the inquiry of scientific research exploring gene-disease associations, I side with Liz Roberts’ want for a “synthetic, symmetrical analysis that understands environment-body interactions as always relational and constructed phenomena”. This is no easy thing to achieve. My way into discussing her proposal is more philosophical than…
 
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    Constructing Amusement

  • Online Games and Digital Ethnography

    17 Mar 2015 | 6:04 am
    My article on Online Games and Digital Ethnography is now available.  It is part of The International Encyclopedia of Digital Communication and Society. So many good articles, with a handful of them provided as samples.
  • Constructing Amusement... in transition!

    8 Dec 2014 | 6:52 am
    It's been a busy Fall semester, with an even busier Spring on the horizon. Among many projects in the works, a new slicker website. Watch this space for announcements to come! Until then, follow me on twitter @cheeflo for the latest and greatest in stream-of-consciousness constructions of amusement. Best wishes to all in the final stretch! --FMC
  • Job posting for tenure-track position: Assistant Professor of Advocacy and Social Change

    8 Sep 2014 | 3:26 pm
    At School of Communication at LUC this Fall, the search has begun for someone interested in advocacy and social change with a strong background in digital technology. Details here: Assistant Professor of Advocacy and Social Change The School of Communication at Loyola University Chicago is looking for a tenure track assistant professor specializing in advocacy and social change, with an
  • Exciting research plans for the summer

    19 May 2014 | 9:49 am
    Now on the other side of my first academic year on the Tenure Track, I'm happy to say that the whirring of the machine has not stopped here at Constructing Amusement. Teaching: Courses I've taught in the School of Communication at Loyola University Chicago so far include: Communication and New Media, Game Studies, Critical Ethnography, and Intro to Digital Media (Grad). Ethics: At the Center
  • Announcing April’s SIMLab Brown Bag talk: Investigating a MMOG community through a social justice framework

    31 Mar 2014 | 10:46 am
    Time/Place: April 7th, 2014 @12pm, SIMLab (SOC 016) Speaker: Kelly Bergstrom, York University As with all games, Massively Multiplayer Online Games (MMOGs) are a voluntary leisure activity. However, the voluntary nature of play does not necessarily mean these gameworlds are equally open to all.  To illustrate barriers to participation I present a case study of EVE Online, a space-themed MMOG
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    Visual Anthropology of Japan - 日本映像人類学

  • Life of Cats: Selections from the Hiraki Ukiyo-e Collection at the Japan Society - And Cats Understanding Sign Language!

    27 Mar 2015 | 11:48 pm
    Image and text borrowed from Japan Society.Announcement: Life of Cats: Selections from the Hiraki Ukiyo-e Collection Friday, March 13 – Sunday, June 7, 2015 Since arriving in Japan aboard Japanese ships transporting sacred Buddhist scriptures from China in the mid-sixth century, cats have proceeded to purr and paw their way into the heart of Japanese life, folklore, and art. Life of Cats: Selections from the Hiraki Ukiyo-e Collection illustrates the depth of this mutual attraction by mining the wealth of bravura depictions of cats to be found in ukiyo-e woodblock prints of the Edo Period…
  • Tashiro Furukawa’s 170th Birthday Google Doodle

    27 Mar 2015 | 7:30 am
    Text borrowed from Olivia Huynh at Google Doodle. To celebrate Tashiro Furukawa’s 170th birthday, students sign “Google” in both his original sign language, and the modern fingerspelling it evolved into. Tashiro Furukawa was a pioneer in blind and deaf education in Japan. He was a schoolteacher whose many contributions to education included opening the Blind and Deaf School in 1878, which is still opened to students to this day. For this doodle I wanted to focus on his accomplishments in educational field. I explored the idea of showing him in the classroom teaching or interacting with…
  • 2015 Deaflympics

    24 Mar 2015 | 5:23 pm
    Text and images borrowed from 18th Winter Deaflympics webpage. PERFOMANCES WHICH LEAVE YOU SPEECHLESS by Czech Deaf Skier, Tereza Kmochova, who expects to participate for Dealfympics in Khanty-Mansiysk and Magnitogorsk, Russia, from 28 March to 5 April, 2015.Link: http://www.2015deaflympics.org/Athletes spread the word about DeaflympicsStory from The Japan News, 3/25/15. How many people actually know about the Deaflympics? According to a survey conducted by the Cabinet Office in 2007, only 2.8 percent of people in Japan knew that such an event for the hearing-impaired even exists. That pales…
  • "Buddhist monk arrested for filming up girl's skirt on escalator"

    22 Mar 2015 | 1:37 am
    Businessmen, judges, policemen, teachers... and now a monk? Story from Japan Today, 3/22/15: Police have arrested a 41-year-old Buddhist monk for using his smartphone to film up the skirt of a 16-year-old girl as she was on an escalator at JR Odawara Station in Kanagawa Prefecture. According to police, the incident occurred at around 9:30 p.m. Saturday. The monk was identified as Masuhiro Masuda from a temple in Hadano, TBS reported. The girl was on a long escalator with her father when she suspected that Masuda, who was behind her, was using his smartphone to film up her skirt. Her father…
  • More cool sign language interpretation: "This Cheeky Sign Language Interpreter Totally Stole The Show At A Singing Competition"

    16 Mar 2015 | 11:58 pm
    Another head's up from Emily... Source is BuzzFeed: While signing during a performance from Eurovision competitor Magnus Carlsson, Swedish sign artist Tommy Krångh rendered the international heartthrob practically invisible this week with an enthusiastic performance. The Scandinavian network SVT was airing the signed version of the Scandinavian music competition show “Melodifestivalen.” Within two days of being posted the video went viral, garnering over 800,000 views and a giant international social media plea to “send Tommy to Vienna” for the Eurovision finals. “My world has been…
 
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    International Cognition and Culture Institute

  • Astuti and Bloch on "Incest, intentionality, and morality"

    13 Mar 2015 | 2:18 am
    A thought-provoking article by Rita Astuti and Maurice BlochThe causal cognition of wrong doing: incest, intentionality and morality," in Frontiers in Psychology, 18 February 2015. From the Abstract: Anthropologists have claimed that, in certain non-Western societies, people ignore whether an act of wrong doing is committed intentionally or accidentally. To examine this proposition, we look at the case of Madagascar. We start by analyzing how Malagasy people respond to incest, and we find that in this case they do not seem to take intentionality into account: catastrophic consequences follow…
  • Should preferences based on authoritarianism and social dominance be treated as moral?

    6 Mar 2015 | 12:03 pm
    An interesting critical discussion of Jonathan Haidt's apprach to morality from a social psychology and political science point of view: "Another Look at Moral Foundations Theory: Do Authoritarianism and Social Dominance Orientation Explain Liberal-Conservative Differences in ‘‘Moral’’ Intuitions?" by Matthew Kugler, John T. Jost, and Sharareh Noorbaloochi (in Social Justice Research. 27.4 (2014): 413-431). Abstract: Moral foundations theorists propose that the moral domain should include not only ‘‘liberal’’ ethics of justice and care but also ostensibly…
  • Why reading minds is not like reading words

    22 Jan 2015 | 6:55 am
    Written by Brent Strickland and Pierre Jacob In a recent review paper in Science (2014. 344-6190) entitled “The cultural evolution of mind reading,” Cecilia Heyes and Chris Frith argue that human children learn to read minds much like they learn to read words, via explicit verbal instruction from knowledgeable adults. On their view, both abilities are inherited culturally as opposed to genetically. Their argument for this thought-provoking analogy rests on three basic claims: (1)  Mindreading exhibits as much cultural diversity as reading words. (2)  The case of word…
  • Culture: A scientific idea "ready for retirement"?

    5 Jan 2015 | 2:16 am
    Every year the website edge.org asks their panel a general question on science and/or society. The 2014 question was: “What scientific idea is ready for retirement?“ I did not read (yet) all the answers, but I was surprised to see that two of them, from Pascal Boyer and John Tooby, were one and the same: culture. One could take the answers as a provocation of two evolutionary psychology-minded scholars against mainstream cultural anthropology (which I’d subscribe to). However, knowing Boyer and Tooby's work, and since, when people ask me what my research is about, I tend…
  • What Explains the Emergence of Moralizing Religions?

    24 Dec 2014 | 2:23 am
    An ambitious article: "Increased Affluence Explains the Emergence of Ascetic Wisdoms and Moralizing Religions", by Nicolas Baumard, Alexandre Hyafil, Ian Morris, and Pascal Boyer in Current Biology, 25, 1 (2015) (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2014.10.063)SummaryBackground: Between roughly 500 BCE and 300 BCE, three distinct regions, the Yangtze and Yellow River Valleys, the Eastern Mediterranean, and the Ganges Valley, saw the emergence of highly similar religious traditions with an unprecedented emphasis on self-discipline and asceticism…
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    Anthropological Notebook

  • New blog: International Summer School in Southeast Asian Studies

    18 Mar 2015 | 5:10 am
    Interested in Southeast Asia, the study of, the thinking about, the living in? We have a new blog, mainly to showcase the work of our postgraduate participants in the International Summer School in Southeast Asian Studies, an annual two-week programme jointly-organised by Universiti Sains Malaysia in Penang (USM), the Institute of Asian and African Studies of Humboldt Universität zu Berlin (
  • Aliran Down the Ages

    30 Jan 2015 | 9:45 am
    Here's a bit of Malaysian social history, as seen through the work of Aliran, Malaysia's oldest human rights group. Watch how information dissemination styles have changed since the 1970s, when the group was founded. Past 2010, all the images (and video) were shot by me.  
  • Call for Papers: the Eleventh Conference on Hunting and Gathering Societies (CHAGS 11)

    21 Dec 2014 | 5:06 pm
    The Eleventh CONFERENCE ON HUNTING AND GATHERING SOCIETIES (CHAGS 11) will be held in Vienna, September 7-11, 2015. The CALL FOR PAPERS has been announced here: https://chags.univie.ac.at/ Deadline for submission of abstracts is February 20, 2015 "All accepted session abstracts can be viewed online at our CHAGS 11 website. We mandate that ALL individual participants need to register and
  • Hi-jinks in the lean-to

    14 May 2014 | 6:49 pm
    Sometimes I do wonder if my little friends have a pact among themselves, "Quick, start acting cute! Anthropologist coming!" Batek children in Taman Negara, 2013
  • Weavers of the forest

    14 May 2014 | 5:33 pm
    A mother knows how it's done. naʔSarik (top left) was weaving miniature baskets for her boys, who had demanded to have their own fruit-storing containers. Her mother showed her how to make the bends. Later (left) I found her weaving a mat.
 
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    Glossographia

  • Call for Papers: Strange Science: Anthropological Encounters with the Fringe

    schrisomalis
    19 Mar 2015 | 5:30 am
    Call for Papers, 2015 American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting, Denver, Colorado (Nov. 18-22, 2015) Strange Science: Anthropological Encounters with the Fringe Anthropology has a long history of interactions with non-mainstream or pseudoscientific ideas. In our scholarship, classrooms, and public outreach, we are frequently confronted by advocates of ideas far beyond mainstream scientific understandings. Some of these ideas are directly challenged by anthropological data, such as ‘scientific’ racism, intelligent design, hyperdiffusionism, ancient aliens, 2012 millenarianism,…
  • Why adjunct labor matters to all of us

    schrisomalis
    25 Feb 2015 | 6:12 am
    Today is National Adjunct Walkout Day, and if National Anthropology Day (from my last post) is not going to become a statutory holiday, you can be doubly sure that this one won’t either.   It has come about in order to raise awareness of and provoke action against a serious problem: the working conditions of adjunct faculty in academia.  Along with organizations like the New Faculty Majority, the aim of NAWD is to highlight the low pay, lack of benefits, and insecure employment of most of the people who teach college students today. I, along with a significant but declining number of…
  • How and why (not) to go to grad school (Happy National Anthropology Day!)

    schrisomalis
    19 Feb 2015 | 6:15 am
    Today, Feb. 19, is National Anthropology Day.  Now, you may not have previously heard of this hallowed waypoint in the seasonal cycle, and the likelihood that you’ll see Hallmark picking up on this is close to zero, but nevertheless, here it is. In honor of this most glorious occasion, I will be presenting a talk I’ve given many times before, in various forms, entitled ‘How and why (not) to go to grad school’, in this case, at a seminar sponsored by the Wayne State Anthropology Learning Community.  (By the way, in case you were wondering, learning communities, when…
  • Language, Culture, and History: a reading list

    schrisomalis
    15 Feb 2015 | 8:42 am
    Having appropriately propitiated the curricular deities, it appears that this coming fall, I’m going to be teaching a graduate seminar in linguistic anthropology on the topic of Language, Culture, and History.   The readings will be drawn from linguistically-oriented historical anthropology and ethnohistory, anthropologically-oriented historical sociolinguistics, and linguistically-oriented archaeology, if that makes any sense.  Maybe not? Anyway, last night I put together my ‘long list’ of 40-odd books that we might potentially read. Some of these will come off the list…
  • Still embuggered up

    schrisomalis
    2 Feb 2015 | 6:29 pm
    Over five years ago, I published what was (for a long time) to be my most popular post here at Glossographia, A feisty embuggerance, in which I described in the wild a particularly bizarre sort of optical character recognition error that found its way into Google Scholar’s metadata, resulting in an otherwise ordinary paper authored by the unlikely duo of Escalate Embuggerance and Holistic Feisty (Embuggerance and Feisty 1985).  After the folks at Language Log talked about it, I thought for sure that it would be scant weeks before the error was corrected.   Alas, here we are, in 2015,…
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    media/anthropology

  • 16. A letter from Jakarta

    John Postill
    21 Mar 2015 | 8:22 am
    Many years ago, in 1987, I left Madrid and came to Jakarta to become a journalist. For about a year, I was a trainee at Tempo magazine and a stringer with Spain’s national newsagency, EFE. I lived with local host families and learned reasonably good Indonesian, but couldn’t quite figure out Indonesia. So I decided to become an anthropologist. (I was also a lousy journalist, too laid-back, or so I gathered from one of my mentors, the poet and journalist Goenawan Mohamad). After a long detour, I am back in Jakarta. This time as an anthropologist. I am still trying to figure out…
  • 15. Location technologists: the politics of digital media in a ‘special region’ of Indonesia

    John Postill
    16 Mar 2015 | 6:16 am
    Chapter proposal to Location Technologies in International Context, Rowan Wilken (Swinburne Uni of Tech), Gerard Goggin (U of Sydney) & Heather Horst (RMIT), eds. John Postill RMIT University 16 March 2015 As noted in the book’s Introduction, there is a growing technical literature on the proliferation of ‘location technologies’, particularly in North America and Europe (e.g. Goswami 2012, Williams et al 2011). Largely missing from this literature, however, is a conceptual vocabulary that can place these and other location technologies in different cultural and political contexts,…
  • 14. Field theory, media change and the new citizen movements

    John Postill
    5 Mar 2015 | 8:52 am
    This draft article is the fourteenth post in the freedom technologists series. Field theory, media change and the new citizen movements: the case of Spain’s ‘real democracy turn’, 2011-2014. Forthcoming (see PDF or join the lively discussion of this paper via Academia.edu till 26 March 2015). Dr John Postill RMIT University Melbourne, Australia 23 December 2014 Abstract Field theory can help to produce more nuanced analyses of the relationship between media change and the rise of new citizen movements. In turn, this can be of invaluable assistance in our comparative understanding of the…
  • Workshop note on digital media and socio-political change

    John Postill
    3 Mar 2015 | 6:26 am
    By Victor Lasa On 20 February 2015, Dr John Postill convened a workshop with fellow RMIT scholars and research students around the topic of “Digital media and socio-political change”. Participants came from a range of disciplinary and professional backgrounds, including anthropology, journalism, economics, and cultural studies (see their profiles here). The aim of the workshop was to get to know each other’s work and research interests and explore potential collaborations. One of the threads emerging from the discussions was the idea that the internet has been considered a space for…
  • E-seminar on the Energy and Digital Living website by Sarah Pink et al

    John Postill
    25 Feb 2015 | 10:25 pm
    This is the opening post of the EASA Media Anthropology Network’s 50th e-seminar, convened by Veronica Barassi (Goldsmiths). The session is currently under way. E-seminars are free and open to anyone with a genuine interest in the anthropology of media. To participate please subscribe to our mailing list via this page. Dear All, Welcome to the 50th EASA Media Anthropology Network e-seminar! For those of you who are new to this mailing list, these sessions run for two weeks on the list and all subscribers are welcome to participate. For this special occasion we will not be…
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    American Journal of Physical Anthropology

  • Developmental defects in the teeth of three wild chimpanzees from the Taï forest

    Tanya M. Smith, Christophe Boesch
    27 Mar 2015 | 4:25 am
    ABSTRACT Objectives:Developmental defects in teeth (accentuated lines and hypoplasias) have played a critical role in studies of childhood disease, nutrition, weaning, environmental variation, and early mortality. While these enigmatic structures have been lauded for their potential insights into human evolution, few studies have examined defects in individuals of known histories. Materials and Methods:Here we document defects in the molars of three wild juvenile chimpanzees from the Taï forest (Pan troglodytes verus) and compare them with behavioral, epidemiological, and environmental…
  • Predicting euarchontan body mass: A comparison of tarsal and dental variables

    Gabriel S. Yapuncich, Justin T. Gladman, Doug M. Boyer
    27 Mar 2015 | 4:24 am
    ABSTRACT Objective: Multiple meaningful ecological characterizations of a species revolve around body mass. Because body mass cannot be directly measured in extinct taxa, reliable body mass predictors are needed. Many published body mass prediction equations rely on dental dimensions, but certain skeletal dimensions may have a more direct and consistent relationship with body mass. We seek to evaluate the reliability of prediction equations for inferring euarchontan body mass based on measurements of the articular facet areas of the astragalus and calcaneus. Methods: Surface areas of five…
  • Patrilineal populations show more male transmission of reproductive success than cognatic populations in Central Asia, which reduces their genetic diversity

    Evelyne Heyer, Jean-Tristan Brandenburg, Michela Leonardi, Bruno Toupance, Patricia Balaresque, Tanya Hegay, Almaz Aldashev, Frederic Austerlitz
    27 Mar 2015 | 4:24 am
    ABSTRACT Objective: The extent to which social organization of human societies impacts the patterns of genetic diversity remains an open question. Here, we investigate the transmission of reproductive success in patrilineal and cognatic populations from Central Asia using a coalescent approach. Methods: We performed a study on the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y chromosome polymorphism of patrilineal and cognatic populations from Central Asia. We reconstructed the gene genealogies in each population for both kind of markers and inferred the imbalance level of these genealogies, a parameter…
  • A linear model for predicting δ13Cprotein

    William J. Pestle, Mark Hubbe, Erin K. Smith, Joseph M. Stevenson
    27 Mar 2015 | 4:23 am
    ABSTRACT Objective: Development of a model for the prediction of δ13Cprotein from δ13Ccollagen and Δ13Cap-co. Model-generated values could, in turn, serve as “consumer” inputs for multisource mixture modeling of paleodiet. Methods: Linear regression analysis of previously published controlled diet data facilitated the development of a mathematical model for predicting δ13Cprotein (and an experimentally generated error term) from isotopic data routinely generated during the analysis of osseous remains (δ13Cco and Δ13Cap-co). Results: Regression analysis resulted in a two-term linear…
  • Weaning age in an expanding population: stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis of infant feeding practices in the Okhotsk culture (5th–13th centuries AD) in Northern Japan

    Takumi Tsutaya, Hajime Ishida, Minoru Yoneda
    27 Mar 2015 | 4:23 am
    ABSTRACT Objective: The Okhotsk people were sedentary hunter–gatherer–fishers who lived and prospered in Sakhalin, Hokkaido, and the Kurile Islands during the 5th to 13th centuries AD. They expanded rapidly along the northeastern coast of Hokkaido. We reconstructed infant feeding practices of the Moyoro population of the Okhotsk culture in eastern Hokkaido, Japan. Methods: Stable isotope ratios in 58 subadult human skeletons were measured. Results: The results suggest that complementary foods with a relatively low carbon isotope ratio were consumed during and after weaning, as observed in…
 
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    BOAS Network

  • Talking Shit : Pitch Video For a Real Person Budget!

    Kohanya Groff
    6 Mar 2015 | 11:29 am
  • Chester Nez, 93, Dies; Navajo Words Washed From Mouth Helped Win War

    BOAS
    22 Jan 2015 | 2:10 pm
    By MARGALIT FOX JUNE 5, 2014 Original article retrieved from The New York Times To the end of his life, Chester Nez recalled the first message he sent over the radio while serving at Guadalcanal: “Enemy machine gun nest on your right. Destroy.” Receiving the message, American forces eliminated the threat. Mr. Nez, a former United States Marine who died on Wednesday at 93, had sent the message not in English but rather in a code he had helped create. It originally went much like this: “Anaai (Enemy) naatsosi (Japanese) beeldooh alhaa dildoni (machine gun) nishnaajigo nahdikadgo (on…
  • Dr. Michael Waters: SB Symposium on Human Origins II

    BOAS
    21 Jan 2015 | 1:05 pm
    BOAS Network presents the Santa Barbara Symposium on Human Origins II at the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History. Dr. Mike Waters, Texas A&M University presents “In Search of the First Americas: The Archaeological Evidence for the Peopling of the Americas at the end of the last Ice Age.” His research indicates that humans came to the Americas well before the Clovis people. Public Lectures, September 13, 2014 at the Lobero Theatre. Visit http://boasnetwork.com for more anthropology videos.
  • Dr. John Johnson: Santa Barbara Symposium on Human Origins II

    BOAS
    15 Dec 2014 | 1:45 pm
    BOAS Network presents: Santa Barbara Symposium on Human Origins II. Dr. John Johnson, Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History, presenting “Arlington Springs: The Settlement of North America from the perspective of Santa Barbara.” Day Two: Public Lectures, Lobero Theatre, September 13, 2014.
  • Dr. Greger Larson: Santa Barbara Symposium on Human Origins II

    BOAS
    15 Dec 2014 | 12:59 pm
    BOAS Network presents: Santa Barbara Symposium on Human Origins II. Day Two: Public Lectures with Dr. Greger Larson, University of Oxford, “Bodies in Motion: Understanding the relation between Migration and Hybridization.”
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