Anthropology

  • Most Topular Stories

  • Food and Eating: An Anthropological Perspective

    Delicious/tag/anthropology
    24 Nov 2014 | 6:21 am
  • To meat or not to meat? New perspectives on Neanderthal ecology

    American Journal of Physical Anthropology
    Luca Fiorenza, Stefano Benazzi, Amanda G. Henry, Domingo C. Salazar-García, Ruth Blasco, Andrea Picin, Stephen Wroe, Ottmar Kullmer
    19 Nov 2014 | 2:47 am
    ABSTRACT Neanderthals have been commonly depicted as top predators who met their nutritional needs by focusing entirely on meat. This information mostly derives from faunal assemblage analyses and stable isotope studies: methods that tend to underestimate plant consumption and overestimate the intake of animal proteins. Several studies in fact demonstrate that there is a physiological limit to the amount of animal proteins that can be consumed: exceeding these values causes protein toxicity that can be particularly dangerous to pregnant women and newborns. Consequently, to avoid food…
  • Were Neanderthals a sub-species of modern humans? New research says no

    Anthropology News -- ScienceDaily
    18 Nov 2014 | 11:16 am
    Researchers have identified new evidence supporting the growing belief that Neanderthals were a distinct species separate from modern humans (Homo sapiens), and not a subspecies of modern humans.
  • Anthropology Deciphers the Ebola Crisis

    Anthropology.net
    nataliamagnani
    30 Oct 2014 | 6:05 am
    To the world outside that of the victims, The Ebola crisis is one of hazmat suits and anonymous bodies. However, emerging along with the voices of doctors are those of medical anthropologists, who ask for an interior perspective in dealing with the epidemic. West African countries are truly suffering, particularly those of Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Guinea. According to anthropologist Adia Benton, in an article by Providence Journal, numbers are most likely much higher than reported. Along with hospital counts are those bodies too weak to ever make it to a hospital and into statistics books.
  • Breaking with tradition: 'Personal touch' is key to cultural preservation

    Anthropology News -- ScienceDaily
    24 Nov 2014 | 7:32 am
    'Memes' transfer cultural information like rituals in much the way that genes inherit biological properties. Now a study provides insight into the building blocks of cultural replication and the different ways they're used to preserve traditional rituals and practices.
 
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    Anthropology.net

  • Kostenki 14 – A 36,000 Year Old European

    Kambiz Kamrani
    7 Nov 2014 | 12:37 pm
    Just what makes a European? European genetic ancestry used to seem straightforward and in general is now understood as an admixture of three sources; indigenous European hunter-gatherers from 42,00 to 45,000 ago, Middle Easterners from the agricultural revolution 10,000 years ago, and Central Asians who charged through Europe in the last 4,000 to 5,000 years. Last month, a paper in Nature, suggested at each entity entered Europe by way of a separate migrations and only coalesced in the last 5,000 years. A new study published in yesterday’s Science changes this suggestion. The 1954…
  • The Story of Place

    Kambiz Kamrani
    7 Nov 2014 | 10:44 am
    The Story of Place is a short film about the unprotected territory of the Greater Canyonlands. This film follows Craig Childs, Ace Kvale and Jim Enote, who narrate the story of this grand landscape, and its pivotal role in the peopling the Americas. This region of southeastern Utah is a veritable well of human culture history. You may know of Canyonlands National Park as a colorful landscape created by rivers eroding into countless canyons, mesas, and buttes. This National Park was created by President Lyndon Johnson on September 12, 1964 and is divided into four districts: the Island in the…
  • Anthropology Deciphers the Ebola Crisis

    nataliamagnani
    30 Oct 2014 | 6:05 am
    To the world outside that of the victims, The Ebola crisis is one of hazmat suits and anonymous bodies. However, emerging along with the voices of doctors are those of medical anthropologists, who ask for an interior perspective in dealing with the epidemic. West African countries are truly suffering, particularly those of Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Guinea. According to anthropologist Adia Benton, in an article by Providence Journal, numbers are most likely much higher than reported. Along with hospital counts are those bodies too weak to ever make it to a hospital and into statistics books.
  • The Lives Behind Plant Documents

    nataliamagnani
    10 Oct 2014 | 1:42 pm
    In the county of Uasin Gishu, Kenya, a recent article in Ethnobotany Research and Applications, local plants have many uses for fodder, medicine, food, and building material, but today this knowledge is threatened by increased pressures on the land. While the list of plants and their uses provides valuable basic knowledge, the article heightened my interest in a completely different realm of inquiry. Medicinal plants in particular have very social, dynamic lives, from their administration by healers or healthcare personnel, to the everyday person collecting for personal health needs, to the…
  • 39,000 Year Old Cave Art from Sulawesi, Indonesia

    Kambiz Kamrani
    8 Oct 2014 | 6:28 pm
    Photo by Kinez Riza This hand stencil was discovered in one of the caves of the Maros region of the island, Sulawesi in the 1950s. A paper published in Nature now describes the dating of the sediment on top of the stencil, which makes it more than 39,000 years old and now the oldest painting in the world. Adjacent to this stencil a painting of a babirusa or pig-deer which is 35,400 years old, which makes it among the earliest figurative depictions. The oldest dated hand stencil in the world (upper right) and possibly the oldest figurative depiction in cave art—a female babirusa (a hoglike…
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    Savage Minds

  • Ferguson: A Blog Entry

    Rex
    26 Nov 2014 | 12:14 am
    Savage Minds has gotten a lot more sophisticated than we were when we first started this blog almost ten years ago: We have guest bloggers, comp’d copies of books for our book reviews, and polished, seven thousand word interviews. And for the past couple of years we’ve also gotten an increased amount of accolades and recognition for some reason — mostly because we’ve been able to stay around longer than most. But I feel that somewhere in this mix of newfound coordination and respectability we’ve gotten away a little bit from our origins as bloggers: entries that…
  • Where to publish in OA anthropology

    Matt Thompson
    22 Nov 2014 | 5:45 pm
    Below is a list of open access English language cultural anthropology titles with general information about the journal’s policies and website for authors to consider when choosing a venue to publish their work. If you would like to learn more about the various Creative Commons licenses, check this link. Journal titles with some missing descriptive data have been contacted and updates will be ongoing as they respond. Note that the inclusive dates after the title are meant to describe what is available to read freely online, which may or may not represent the true life of the journal.
  • Thinking through the untranslatable

    Carole McGranahan
    17 Nov 2014 | 5:45 am
    This entry is part 12 of 12 in the Fall 2014 Writer’s Workshop series.(Savage Minds is pleased to post this essay by guest author Kevin Carrico as part of our Writer’s Workshop series. Kevin is a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Oklahoma’s Institute for US-China Issues, having completed his PhD in Sociocultural Anthropology at Cornell University in 2013. His research focuses upon the implications of Han nationalism for ethnic relations in China. He is a contributor to Cultural Anthropology’s special issue on Self-Immolation as Protest in Tibet, and his translation of…
  • Boas and the Monolingualism of the Other

    Kerim
    16 Nov 2014 | 4:04 am
    In my last post on Bauman and Briggs Voices of Modernity I explored their argument that Boas’s notion of culture makes it seem like a prison house from which only the trained anthropologist is capable of escaping. In doing so, however, I only really presented half of their argument. The book has two interrelated themes: One is a Foucauldian genealogy of the concepts of science, culture, race, language, and nation (as seen through the rise of folklore studies). The other is a Latourian exploration of the construction of folklore as a science. This is done by exploring how oral traditions…
  • Anthropology: It’s still white public space–An interview with Karen Brodkin (Part I)

    Ryan
    15 Nov 2014 | 9:33 am
    The following is an interview with Karen Brodkin, Professor Emeritus in the UCLA anthropology Department. Ryan Anderson:  You co-wrote an article back in 2011 with Sandra Morgen and Janis Hutchinson about anthropology as “white public space” (AWPS).  What’s your assessment of the state of anthropology three years later?  If you could add an “update” to this article, what would it be? Karen Brodkin: The short answer is that anthropology is still white public space, especially in the consistently different ways that white and racialized minority anthropologists…
 
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    Anthropology News -- ScienceDaily

  • Biopolitics for understanding social regulation and control

    24 Nov 2014 | 9:51 am
    People, as the biological beings that we are, can be socially regulated by mechanisms such as taxes, property or family relationships. This constitutes part of the social policy that the Roman government put into practice during its expansion throughout the Mediterranean, which left its mark on the eastern plateau of Spain, the historical Celt Iberian territory.
  • Breaking with tradition: 'Personal touch' is key to cultural preservation

    24 Nov 2014 | 7:32 am
    'Memes' transfer cultural information like rituals in much the way that genes inherit biological properties. Now a study provides insight into the building blocks of cultural replication and the different ways they're used to preserve traditional rituals and practices.
  • Recreating clothes from the Iron Age

    24 Nov 2014 | 4:48 am
    A few years ago, the oldest known piece of clothing ever discovered in Norway, a tunic dating from the Iron Age, was found on a glacier in Breheimen. Now about to be reconstructed using Iron Age textile techniques, it is hoped the tunic will inspire Norwegian fashion designers.
  • Out of India: Finding the origins of horses, rhinos

    20 Nov 2014 | 5:17 am
    Working at the edge of a coal mine in India, a team of researchers has filled in a major gap in science’s understanding of the evolution of a group of animals that includes horses and rhinos. That group likely originated on the subcontinent when it was still an island headed swiftly for collision with Asia, the researchers report.
  • Were Neanderthals a sub-species of modern humans? New research says no

    18 Nov 2014 | 11:16 am
    Researchers have identified new evidence supporting the growing belief that Neanderthals were a distinct species separate from modern humans (Homo sapiens), and not a subspecies of modern humans.
 
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    Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog

  • E-M81 in Morocco

    Dienekes
    25 Nov 2014 | 8:38 am
    Hum Biol. 2014 May;86(2):105-12. Phylogeography of e1b1b1b-m81 haplogroup and analysis of its subclades in morocco. Reguig A, Harich N, Barakat A, Rouba H. AbstractIn this study we analyzed 295 unrelated Berber-speaking men from northern, central, and southern Morocco to characterize frequency of the E1b1b1b-M81 haplogroup and to refine the phylogeny of its subclades: E1b1b1b1-M107, E1b1b1b2-M183, and E1b1b1b2a-M165. For this purpose, we typed four biallelic polymorphisms: M81, M107, M183, and M165. A large majority of the Berber-speaking male lineages belonged to the Y-chromosomal…
  • Paternal lineages and languages in the Caucasus

    Dienekes
    25 Nov 2014 | 8:01 am
    An interesting new study on Y chromosome and languages in the Caucasus. The distribution of haplogroups is on the left. The authors make some associations of haplogroups with language families:R1b: Indo-EuropeanR1a: Scytho-SarmatianJ2: Hurro-UrartianG2: KartvelianHum Biol. 2014 May;86(2):113-30.Human paternal lineages, languages, and environment in the caucasus. Tarkhnishvili D1, Gavashelishvili A1, Murtskhvaladze M1, Gabelaia M1, Tevzadze G2. AbstractPublications that describe the composition of the human Y-DNA haplogroup in diffferent ethnic or linguistic groups and geographic regions…
  • Genome of Kostenki-14, an Upper Paleolithic European (Seguin-Orlando, Korneliussen, Sikora, et al. 2014)

    Dienekes
    7 Nov 2014 | 12:00 am
    A new paper in Science reports on the genome of Kostenki-14 (K14), an Upper Paleolithic European from Russia. This is now the third oldest Homo sapiens for which we have genetic data, after Ust'-Ishim (Siberia, 45 thousand years), Tianyuan (China, 40 thousand years), and now Kostenki (European part of Russia, 37 thousand years). Of these three genomes, the Ust'-Ishim is both the highest coverage and earliest (Siberia is the gift that keeps on givin'), Tianyuan only has its chromosome 21 known, and K14, a complete 2.42x coverage sequence (and, apparently, good teeth, after all these years;…
  • Long live the 28th October 1940

    Dienekes
    27 Oct 2014 | 8:14 pm
  • High coverage genome from 45,000-year old Siberian (Ust'-Ishim)

    Dienekes
    22 Oct 2014 | 12:14 pm
    This is the oldest full genome of a modern human published to date and it also comes from a time (45 thousand years ago) that coincides with the Upper Paleolithic revolution in Eurasia.45 thousand years ago is probably close to when Eurasians started diverging from each other as they spread in all directions. So, we expect that a human from that time would be "undifferentiated Eurasian" and indeed this seems to be the case.First the Y-chromosome:The Y chromosome sequence of the Ust’-Ishim individual is similarly inferred to be ancestral to a group of related Y chromosomes (haplogroup…
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    ZERO ANTHROPOLOGY

  • 25 Years without the Berlin Wall

    Donnchadh Mac an Ghoill
    8 Nov 2014 | 10:11 pm
    Needless to say, the end of foreign imposed partition is an occasion of joy for any country. Here in Ireland, we look forward to the day when the British occupation will be lifted, and our land returned to native rule. Koreans also look forward to the day when Anglo-Saxon forces leave their land, and allow the Koreans to decide on their own future. But, unification is only good when the good guys win. In Germany’s case, the good guys lost. Before we go any further, we should note that Joseph Stalin had never been in favour of a partitioned Germany. Despite all that the Soviet people had…
  • Useful Atrocities

    Eva Bartlett
    26 Oct 2014 | 7:07 am
    Who outside of Syria knows the names Yara Abbas, Maya Naser, Mohamed al-Saeed…? The corporate media has inundated us with news of the two American journalists allegedly beheaded, the first of whose execution video has been deemed faked. But what of the non-Western journalists and civilians beheaded and murdered by ISIS, al-Nusra, and associated terrorists in Syria, Iraq, Lebanon, Palestine? Why didn’t the August 2012 execution (which some reported as a beheading) of TV presenter Mohamed al-Saeed, claimed by the Nusra gang, create the same outrage? Or the December 2013 kidnapping and…
  • About Those Good Intentions

    Maximilian Forte
    11 Oct 2014 | 2:52 pm
    The following, the final in our series of extracts, comes from my chapter, “Imperial Abduction Lore and Humanitarian Seduction,” which serves as the introduction to Good Intentions: Norms and Practices of Imperial Humanitarianism (Montreal: Alert Press, 2014), pp. 1-34. This section was primarily addressed to students as readers, and any constructive feedback would be appreciated. There are many valid and unimpeachable reasons why students might be considering humanitarian work and/or working for a NGO. There is no gainsaying that many students have genuine, sincere, and heartfelt reasons…
  • Realism or Iconography? The Pentagon’s Implicit Theory of Visual Representation

    Maximilian Forte
    10 Oct 2014 | 6:13 pm
    The following is an extract from my chapter, “A Flickr of Militarization: Photographic Regulation, Symbolic Consecration, and the Strategic Communication of ‘Good Intentions’,” published in Good Intentions: Norms and Practices of Imperial Humanitarianism (Montreal: Alert Press, 2014), pp. 185-279: US military documents make it quite clear that, for the military, a photograph is a straightforward, truthful, and impartial record of reality as it appeared in front of the camera. However, at the same time these documents suggest that some images might be used as “enemy propaganda”…
  • Road to Victory: Syria’s Zenobians Stand to Win International Rugby Tournament

    Eva Bartlett
    2 Oct 2014 | 1:56 pm
    photo by Eva Bartlett By Eva Bartlett While I don’t follow organized sports, when I got the opportunity to meet the only rugby team in Syria and see them practise, I jumped on it.  I found the fact that these men still meet, train and compete–in spite of the many obstacles which should prevent them from doing so–fascinating. What follows are observations and conversations from a morning with Syria’s Zenobians: Already by 10 am on a blistering June Friday, heat rises in shimmers across the small multi-purpose pitch at Faihaa stadium. At one end, members of the…
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    antropologi.info - anthropology in the news blog

  • Two new anthropology blogs from Norway: Thomas Hylland Eriksen and Sindre Bangstad

    admin
    11 Nov 2014 | 7:31 am
    Lots of new anthropology blogs have been started up recently, most of them have made it into the overviews here at antropologi.info: the anthropology blog newspaper http://www.antropologi.info/blog/ and the - I think - more reader-friendly anthropology blog news ticker http://www.antropologi.info/feeds/anthropology/ (if not, let me know!) Now, I'd like to mention especially two blogs. The first one is Thomas Hylland Eriksen's blog at http://thomashyllanderiksen.net He is one of the most visible anthropologists in the public, he set up his first website already back in prehistoric 1996…
  • What the life of a pair of flip-flops can teach us about migration, inequality and studying up

    admin
    11 Nov 2014 | 3:04 am
    Photo: Cíntia Regina, flickr During the recent (nearly) two years, I've been interviewing researchers that are part of the research project Overheating. The three crises of globalisation: An anthropological history of the early 21st century at the University of Oslo, starting with Thomas Hylland Eriksen: Anthropologists to study humanity’s biggest crises. I also interviewed most of the researchers that were invited to hold seminars. One of the texts that for me was most fun to write was about the research by sociologist Caroline Knowles. For seven years, she has been following a…
  • 10 years antropologi.info and what about the future?

    admin
    12 Sep 2014 | 3:30 pm
    Although it was ten years ago I started this blog and anthropology portal, I am not sure if there is something to celebrate. The website has been more or less dormant for nearly two years now. Despite several attempts to start up blogging again, I failed to keep it going. But now, because of the anniversary, what about starting another attempt? Life is more or less upside down after I went to Cairo, Egypt, three years ago and got stuck here. It was supposed to be a short trip, but I ended up getting married here. That was the most wonderful thing that ever happened to me. But I still have to…
  • "Religion in Digital Games": Relaunch of Open Access journal "Online"

    admin
    28 Feb 2014 | 3:54 am
    "Second Life is their only chance to participate in religious rituals": This seven year old post about the research by anthropologist Tom Boellstorff on the virtual world Second Life came into my mind when I heard about the new special issue "Religion in Digital Games" of the interdisciplinary Open access journal "Online. Heidelberg Journal of Religions on the Internet". The journal is published by the Institute of Religious Studies at the University of Heidelberg and has just been relaunched and redesigned. Religion in online games seems to be still a new topic in the university world.
  • Interview: "Researching fashion means researching inequalities"

    admin
    24 Feb 2014 | 2:06 pm
    Anthropologist Tereza Kuldova, author of many book reviews here on antropologi.info has recently defended her PhD-thesis Designing Elites: Fashion and Prestige in Urban North India". Now she has turned her thesis into a museum exhibition and an edited volume called Fashion India. Spectacular Capitalism. Researching fashion means researching society and economic systems at large, she explains in this antropologi.info interview. In her case studying fashion means especially studying inequalities. antropologi.info: So you turned your PhD thesis both into an exhibition and then into an edited…
 
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    Material World

  • Disobedient Objects

    Haidy Geismar
    20 Nov 2014 | 6:29 am
    Hannah Knox, Lecturer in Digital Anthropology and Material Culture, UCL Anthropology Zapatistas. Attribution: Nathan Gibbsflic.kr/p/3eMx1hLicensed under Creative Commons.   In 1996 I worked in Mexico for eight months and during my time there visited the famous village of San Cristobal de las Casas in Chiapas. One of my abiding memories of San Cristobal was of the women from the village who were selling artisanal products to tourists on cloths laid out on the floor in the square in front of the church. Whilst the sale of artisanal objects was commonplace in Mexican villages, in amongst…
  • London Conference in Critical Thought – Call for Stream Proposals

    Haidy Geismar
    18 Nov 2014 | 5:59 am
    UCL, University of London, 26-27 June 2015 Call for Stream Proposals We’re pleased to announce that LCCT 2015 will be hosted by the UCL department of Anthropology and supported by the UCL Joint Faculty Institute of Graduate Studies, the UCL department of Geography and the London Contemporary Dance School. The call for streams is now open for the 4th annual London Conference in Critical Thought (LCCT). The conference is a space for those who share theoretical approaches and interests, but who frequently find themselves at the margins of their department or discipline. LCCT is an…
  • CASTAC Recruiting for Mentoring Program at 2014 AAAs

    Jo Aiken
    14 Nov 2014 | 2:00 am
    CASTAC, the Committee on the Anthropology of Science, Technology, and Computing, seeks to support the professional development of early career scholars in the anthropology of science and technology. Toward this end, they are launching a new Junior-Senior Mentor Program at the 2014 AAA Annual Meeting. Faculty and senior researchers who would be willing to meet with one or two junior scholars (graduate students and recent PhDs) are invited to participate in the mentor program at the Annual Meeting of the AAA in Washington, DC, this December.  CASTAC is also seeking junior scholars who would…
  • Constructed Complexities Workshop 26-27 Nov 2014 at Barnett Hill, Guildford

    Jo Aiken
    13 Nov 2014 | 2:41 pm
    Social Complexity, Institutions and Power – The 4th Constructed Complexities Workshop Join an international network of interdisciplinary scholars to discuss different ways of approaching emergence, self-organisation, agency, institutions and power within a broad range of complex and theoretically interesting issues such as common resource management and climate change, political ideas and agency, spatial organisation of polities and social and political construction of criminal justice policies. The workshop speakers include Mike Agar (Maryland), Tony Lawson (Cambridge), Mark Olssen…
  • Mellon Emerging Curatorial Postdoctoral Fellowship (Asia), UBC

    Haidy Geismar
    11 Nov 2014 | 2:12 am
    The Museum of Anthropology (MOA) and the Department of Art History, Visual Art and Theory (AHVA) at the University of British Columbia invite applications for an Emerging Curatorial Postdoctoral Fellowship with a focus on Asia to begin May 1 or June 1, 2015. The fellowship, funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, is open to recent doctoral graduates for one year, with possibility of renewal for another year. Salary for this position is expected to be $45,000 per year plus benefits, but may vary, commensurate with qualifications and experience.  In addition, the postdoctoral fellow will be…
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    Museum Anthropology

  • Position Announcement: Senior Curator of Collections, Longyear Museum of Anthropology, Colgate University, Hamilton, New York

    25 Nov 2014 | 6:44 am
    Job Description Reporting to the Director of University Museums, the senior curator of collections of the Longyear Museum of Anthropology is responsible for, but is not limited to, the study, care, use, interpretation, scholarship, publication, and management of the Longyear Museum's collection in its current facility, in anticipation of an envisioned Center for Art and Culture (CAC),
  • Burke Museum to Return Artifacts to Peruvian Government

    17 Nov 2014 | 5:05 pm
    Imana Gunawan, The Daily at the University of Washington November 9, 2014 After four years of coordination, several artifacts from the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture’s Peruvian collection returned to their home country last week. The items include human remains, ceramic vessels and bowls, necklaces, and a textile, each of which have different histories. On Wednesday, the Peruvian
  • Museum Anthropology Leaders: Paul Tapsell, University of Otago, New Zealand, Part 2 of 2

    7 Nov 2014 | 7:00 pm
    Exclusive Museum Anthropology Blog Interview with Paul Tapsell, Professor, School for Maori, Pacific, and Indigenous Studies, University of Otago, New Zealand.  This interview is the fourth installment in our series, Museum Anthropology Leaders, where blog intern Lillia McEnaney will be interviewing various anthropological museum professionals.  This interview was conducted over written email
  • Museum Anthropology Leaders: Paul Tapsell, University of Otago, New Zealand, Part 1 of 2

    31 Oct 2014 | 6:59 pm
    Exclusive Museum Anthropology Blog Interview with Paul Tapsell, Professor, School for Maori, Pacific, and Indigenous Studies, University of Otago, New Zealand.  This interview is the fourth installment in our series, Museum Anthropology Leaders, where blog intern Lillia McEnaney will be interviewing various anthropological museum professionals.  This interview was conducted over written email
  • Call for Applications: Museums at the Crossroads: Local Knowledge, Global Encounters

    21 Oct 2014 | 6:49 pm
    A Summer Institute of the Mathers Museum of World Cultures and the School of Global and International Studies, Indiana University Bloomington, Indiana, USA May 14-21, 2015 The Indiana University Mathers Museum of World Cultures and School of Global and International Studies invite applications for up to eight Museum Partners who will take part in an innovative international workshop on
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    Kimberly Christian's Garcinia Cambogia

  • Facts About alivebynature Weight-Loss Product

    admin
    11 Nov 2014 | 3:15 pm
    Eczema is actually definitely an inflammation of the skin wherein the patches of skin may be red, itchy and slough off. The cause of this disease is unknown as it can certainly occur on any part of the body but is typically found on an arms, knees, elbows and knees. For anybody who is looking for natural treating of eczema, it can be be serious. But some in the most common places you’re able to find things for these natural remedies, are place like the grocery store, vitamin stores such as alivebynature, other sorts of stores. Applying witch hazel towards affected area a few times a day…
  • 3 Raw Food Diet Secrets!

    admin
    24 Oct 2014 | 3:11 pm
    When Janet Lindvall sat in front of her computer, food obvious that she needed lower belly fat. It was an ugly sight to see rolls of fat bulging out from her ab. Fact 9: Metabolic disorders will cause weight realize. Diabetes and hypo thyroid are the most widespread. You need to be medically examined if believe any hang ups. As the cat ages, toxin damage occurs and the best way to make plant based protein supplement cat healthy is by supplying all of them herbs and anti-oxidants like quercitin and rutin sustain their energy. So do you want to get large, beautiful muscles? A person wish…
  • Fat Burning Exercise Advice Foolproof Exercises Guaranteed To Burn Fat Fast

    admin
    13 Aug 2014 | 2:26 am
    Bouncing could be the simplest of the rebounding exercises. it correctly, stand within middle belonging to the rebounder, with your feet shoulder-width apart and start bouncing. Begin this exercise very gently and surely able to balance yourself properly, start bouncing more rigid. The more you bend your knees, much more you can bounce harder. However, take care not to lift an individual a far too much, definitely disbalance . To make this exercise very much effective, make it strenuous by starting to jog at one put. Research has shown that bouncing and jogging on a rebounder share the same…
  • Acid Reflux Alternative Treatments- The Only Remedies For Gerd

    admin
    7 Aug 2014 | 5:51 am
    Natural Cure Gout Remedies are on the list of fastest growing therapy for the most painful type of arthritis, gout. But do you know that millions of consumers are becoming addicted to painkillers for their gout pain? Although the minds and principles of reduced glycemic index diet selection and are healthy, there is little change evidence to suggest that simply eating foods with a lower GI could make you lose excessive fat. There are other things to factor in, in addition to quantity of food eaten (and in order that the number of calories), and activity qualifications. If you eat 3000…
  • How Shed More Calories Fast — 6 Tips To Burn More Calories Fast

    admin
    20 May 2014 | 10:40 pm
    Losing weight has turn into problem by most people nowadays. Generally, statistics reveal that 65% of adult males and 55% of adult females are overweight/obese. That rather a number right? And i’m pretty without doubt of all the people here article, incredible belong in this overweight nfl. When it comes down to losing pounds fast, diet is focused 75% on the solution. Undoubtedly one of the best diets for losing weight quickly is a “paleo-style” diet based around lean proteins, fish, vegetables, raw fruit, nuts, and seeds with little or no grains or “white” carbs…
 
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    Somatosphere

  • Web Roundup: Disaster! by Melanie Boeckmann

    Melanie Boeckmann
    25 Nov 2014 | 5:10 am
    This coming weekend I will attend the Reframing Disaster conference held under the auspices of the Postcolonial Disaster project at the University of Leeds. The conference motto is “disaster is not an event”, highlighting the processes and long-term consequences of catastrophes. I am leading a session on zine writing where we will collect offline and online voices on environmental justice. The conversation is open to everyone under the hashtag #RDzine, and the digital zine will go online after the conference. Elsewhere on the web, disasters, displacement and recovery were discussed from…
  • Daniel Defert’s Une vie politique (A Political Life) by Gabriel Girard

    Gabriel Girard
    25 Nov 2014 | 12:15 am
    Une vie politique [A Political Life] Interviews with P. Artières and E. Favereau, with the collaboration of Joséphine Gross. by Daniel Defert Editions du Seuil, Paris, 2014   On 25 September 1984, Daniel Defert wrote a letter to his friends proposing that they create a non-profit organization to address an emerging disease: AIDS. “In face of a medical crisis and a moral crisis, which is also an identity crisis, I propose that we create a space for reflection, solidarity and transformation,” he wrote. A few weeks later, the association AIDES (which means “help” in French)…
  • Caring as existential insecurity: quarantine, care, and human insecurity in the Ebola crisis by Sung-Joon Park

    Sung-Joon Park
    24 Nov 2014 | 12:15 am
    In August of this year, when the Ebola outbreak escalated in Liberia and a state of emergency had been declared for the country, Fatu Kekula, a young Liberian nursing student, improvised personal protective equipment (PPE) to care for her father, mother, sister, and cousin. After three of the relatives survived, her method was featured prominently in the international news media as the “trash bag method” (CNN, 2014). The reports were meant to ignite a spark of hope in the Ebola epidemic in Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia. International organizations, like UNICEF, even started to promote…
  • Somatosphere & more at #AAA2014 by Eugene Raikhel

    Eugene Raikhel
    20 Nov 2014 | 8:31 am
    In anticipation of the American Anthropological Association’s annual conference in Washington DC from December 3-7, we wanted to point out a number of panels on which various members of Somatosphere’s editorial team will be presenting, as well as several other interesting panels, roundtables, lectures, and events: On Wednesday, December 3rd from 12-1:45pm in Jefferson will be the session “Uncertainty and scenario,” organized by Limor Samimian-Darash (Hebrew University) and Jon Bialecki (University of Edinburgh) and featuring Ryan J. Sayre (Yale University, Meg Stalcup…
  • Johan Asplund’s The Elementary Forms of Social Life by Lika Rodin

    Lika Rodin
    19 Nov 2014 | 7:40 am
    Det sociala livets elementära former [The Elementary Forms of Social Life] by Johan Asplund Bokförlaget Korpen, 1987/2000, 268 pages.   Johan Asplund, whose work has been rather underrepresented in the international academic arena, is frequently seen as the “father” of contemporary Swedish social psychology. Remarkably productive, Asplund gained popularity in the 1970–1980s, and his books are still widely used in academic curricula across the country (Eriksson, 2005). The Elementary Forms of Social Life is one of Aslpund’s most famous and favored writings. Released in 1987, it…
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    Visual Anthropology of Japan - 日本映像人類学

  • Visual Anthropology at the 2014 AJJ Fall Meeting

    26 Nov 2014 | 5:01 am
    The 2014 Anthropology of Japan in Japan Fall Meeting will take place at Nanzen University in Nagoya, Japan on Saturday, November 29 and Sunday, November 30.Click here for instructions to access Nanzen University. Below is information on VAOJ events that might be of interest to visual anthropologists: An Introduction to Visual Anthropology (Guest Lecture)This lecture/workshop will examine visual anthropology, especially in the Japanese context, through a deconstruction of the term and an exploration of “the visual,” “visualization” and “anthropology.” We will then perform a…
  • 2014 秋祭り (Fall Festival)

    24 Nov 2014 | 10:10 pm
    Apologies for another late post. A month ago I participated in my neighborhood's fall festival as I have been doing for a few years now. It was another wonderful time and a great opportunity for photos. However this year the number of participants decreased so my pushing the heavy danjiri was more valued than my photographic efforts. Still the two day festival was successful in bringing people from the neighborhood together. On the second day three neighborhoods came together to share their respective performances (taiko drums, flutes, umbrella dances). After the performances there was a…
  • New Guess Fashion Campaign Features Japan...

    22 Nov 2014 | 9:04 pm
    Text from FashionCopious.com: This holiday season, GUESS introduces its new advertising campaign shot in Japan by acclaimed photographer, Chen Man. Set against the breathtaking backdrops of Mount Fuji and the fields of Tokyo, the campaign is a unique pairing of Eastern and Western cultures that juxtaposes traditional Japanese surroundings against GUESS’ contemporary apparel and accessories. Bridging fine art and fashion photography­—a signature of Chen Man—the hyper-saturated color palette and mixing of cultural influences give the images a wondrous, dreamlike and fantastical…
  • "7 Wonderfully Weird Things to Do in Tokyo"

    22 Nov 2014 | 1:56 am
    Photos and text borrowed from from MSN Travel. Visit a Maid Cafe Eat at Robot Restaurant Spot Freaky Fashions in Harajuku and Akihibara Rock out to Dancehall Reggae Music at Garam Auction for Tuna at the Tsukiji Fish Market Experience Shibuya Crossing Stay in a Capsule HotelSource (and more details): http://www.msn.com/en-us/travel/article/7-wonderfully-weird-things-to-do-in-tokyo/ss-BB9FEGm?ocid=mailsignout#image=1Perhaps good advice if you are looking for a wonderfully stereotyped/staged vacation in Tokyo... But I wonder what is so weird about Tsukiji...? My best advice is to avoid Tokyo…
  • "Nikon repairs Mount Ontake victim’s broken camera, returns photos to family"

    11 Nov 2014 | 8:58 pm
    From Japan Today, 11/12/14: The unexpected eruption of Mount Ontake on September 27 claimed the lives of 56 hikers, leaving family members to try to understand why their loved ones had been taken so suddenly. But out of this tragedy comes a heartwarming gesture, giving the family of one victim the chance to get back a small piece of their father who never made it down the mountain that day. ...The several hundred nature enthusiasts who took advantage of the autumn weekend on September 27 were completely caught off guard, many unable to flee the nightmarish scene when the mountain suddenly and…
 
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    International Cognition and Culture Institute

  • Applications for PhD studentships in Cognitive Science at CEU, Budapest

    10 Nov 2014 | 4:03 am
    PhD studentships are available for the doctoral program in Cognitive Science at Central European University (CEU), Budapest, Hungary. Application deadline: February 1, 2015.The Department of Cognitive Science at CEU invites applications for doctoral student positions starting in September 2015. This is a research-based training program in human cognition with social cognition and learning as core themes. Research topics include cooperation, communication, social learning, cultural transmission, embodied cognition, joint action, cognitive development, strategic decision-making, problem…
  • Is probabilistic cognition universal?

    9 Nov 2014 | 3:49 am
    An interesting paper by Laura Fontanari, Michel Gonzalez, Giorgio Vallortigara, and Vittorio Girotto: "Probabilistic cognition in two indigenous Mayan groups", forthcoming in PNAS. Preprint available here.Abstract: "Is there a sense of chance shared by all individuals, regardless of their schooling or culture? To test whether the ability to make correct probabilistic evaluations depends on educational and cultural guidance, we investigated probabilistic cognition in preliterate and prenumerate Kaqchikel and K’iche’, two indigenous Mayan groups, living in remote areas…
  • Another look at the two-systems model of mindreading

    25 Oct 2014 | 8:50 am
    Apperly and Butterfill (2009) and Butterfill and Apperly (2013) have proposed a two-systems model of mindreading. According to this model, humans make use of two distinct psychological systems in mindreading tasks. The model rests on three related claims. First of all, the early-developing system, which is taken to be efficient, fast and inflexible, is supposed to explain the positive findings based on spontaneous-response tasks showing that infants can track the contents of others’ false beliefs. The later-developing system, which is taken to be slower, inefficient and…
  • [extended deadline] Berlin Symposium on Reciprocity and Social Cognition

    1 Oct 2014 | 6:05 am
    The deadline for submissions to this symposium has been extended to November the 1st.A symposium on 'Reciprocity and social cognition' organized by Anna Strasser, Stephen Butterfill, Richard Moore, Olle Blomberg will take place at the Berlin School of Mind and Brain, 23–25 March 2015. The call for poster deadline is extended to November 1, 2014.Abstract: 
Reciprocity is a common feature of much social cognition. For example, when two people attend to the same object simultaneously they can do so merely in parallel or jointly; only the latter of which involves…
  • Cultural Evolution at the Santa Fe Institute

    3 Sep 2014 | 12:59 am
    Last May, Daniel Dennett gathered, at the Santa Fe Institute, a handful of people who have written about cultural evolution. The general impression was that (as he tweeted some time later) "the meeting revealed a lot of unexpected comon ground". The International Cognition and Culture Institute is happy to publish, by way of proceedings, each participant's summary. Comments are open! Daniel Dennett's introduction (with comments). Participants' summaries (in alphabetical order): Susan Blackmore, Robert Boyd, Nicolas Claidière, Peter Godfrey-Smith, Joseph…
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    Glossographia

  • Review: Wynn and Coolidge, How to think like a Neandertal

    schrisomalis
    17 Nov 2014 | 10:32 am
    Wynn, Thomas, and Frederick Coolidge. 2012. How to think like a Neandertal. New York: Oxford University Press.  224 pp. Reviewed by Summar Saad (Wayne State University) With so many false representations and stereotypes floating around about the Neandertals, it’s difficult to know what is fact and what is myth. Armed with minimal archaeological evidence and their knowledge of primates and modern hunter-gatherers, archaeologist Thomas Wynn and psychologist Frederick Coolidge attempt to reconstruct Neandertal cognitive abilities, sometimes very indirectly, based on their diet, hunting…
  • Linguistics at Futility Closet

    schrisomalis
    16 Nov 2014 | 8:05 pm
    Whether you are as odd as I am – a select number, to be sure – or only wish you were – you should be delighted to hear that the wonderful Futility Closet website has just released its second book-length compilation of curiosities and oddities, Futility Closet 2: A Second Trove of Intriguing Tidbits.    Greg Ross has consistently, for nearly a decade, offered up a panoply of weird facts, puzzles, historical tidbits, trivia, and other strangenesses, virtually every day, at the website.  The book, which follows in the wake of Futility Closet: An Idler’s Miscellany of…
  • Review: Malafouris, How things shape the mind

    schrisomalis
    27 Oct 2014 | 6:03 am
    Malafouris, Lambros. 2013. How things shape the mind: a theory of material engagement. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. 321 pp. Reviewed by Michael Thomas (Wayne State University) In How Things Shape the Mind, the archaeologist Lambros Malafouris outlines his Material Engagement Theory, which developed along the lines of inquiry initiated by Colin Renfrew in his work on measurement and weights. Renfrew, thus, provides a useful introduction to Malafouris’ book. In essence, material engagement is a synthetic approach of a few important developments in the archaeological study of materiality,…
  • Review: Saxe, Cultural development of mathematical ideas

    schrisomalis
    19 Oct 2014 | 8:01 pm
    Saxe, Geoffrey B. 2012. Cultural development of mathematical ideas.  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 393 pp. Reviewed by Summar Saad (Wayne State University) In Cultural Development of Mathematical Ideas, Geoffrey B. Saxe takes an ambitious approach in exploring the cultural and cognitive origins of mathematical thought. Using an extensive number of experiments oriented towards the particular practices of the Oksapmin of Papua New Guinea, Saxe demonstrates that individual action in relation to collective activities such as economic exchange and schooling is the “locus of both the…
  • Review: Ingold, Lines: a brief history

    schrisomalis
    18 Oct 2014 | 12:08 pm
    Ingold, Tim. 2007. Lines: A Brief History. Cambridge, MA and London: Harvard University Press. 186pp. Reviewed by Molly Hilton (Wayne State University) Get out your walking stick and your comfortable shoes as you accompany Tim Ingold on this intellectual wayfarers’ journey exploring the “comparative anthropology of the line” (p1). In his path-breaking book, Lines: A Brief History, Ingold guides readers through a unique theoretical model that explores the interconnected and enmeshed lines of people and things. Ingold argues things and people are the sum of interconnected lines; to study…
 
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    media/anthropology

  • What does anthropology have to say about social media and activism?

    John Postill
    26 Nov 2014 | 6:00 am
    This is an early draft of a short invited piece for Anthropology Unbound: A Field Guide to the 21st Century, 3rd ed. E. Paul Durrenberger and Suzan EremOxford University Press. The remit was to write a jargon-free personal narrative. In the Spring of 2011 I took a short break from anthropological fieldwork among internet activists in Barcelona (Catalonia, Spain) to visit friends and family in Madrid, where I was raised. In a bar near the centre, over cold beers and tapas, I was introduced to a group of middle-aged, bookish people. When they learned I was living in Barcelona, the unavoidable…
  • 10. Freedom technologists series: a first recap (part 2)

    John Postill
    20 Nov 2014 | 3:39 am
    http://autoconsulta.org/mutaciones.php This post completes the first recap of the ongoing freedom technologists series through a brief theoretical exercise, namely applying field theory to the empirical materials gathered so far. I do this via a new concept: ‘fields of civic action’. The intention is not to impose a rigid theoretical framework on the series but rather to try out some conceptual ideas in an open-ended, exploratory spirit, with the field concepts marked in bold.   In this entry I wish to suggest that freedom technologists – those geeks, hackers, tech lawyers,…
  • 9. Freedom technologists series: a first recap (part 1)

    John Postill
    7 Nov 2014 | 4:46 am
    This is the 9th post in the freedom technologists series, a blog series dedicated to exploring the contribution of tech-minded citizens to new protest movements around the globe. In this instalment I summarise the discussion so far, before moving on to some preliminary anthropological reflections in the next post. This blog series opened with a Savage Minds post (reblogged here) in which I argued that 2011 was not only ‘The Year of the Protester’, as TIME magazine once famously put it, but also ‘The Year of the Freedom Technologist’. By freedom technologists I meant ‘a new global…
  • 8. Freedom technologists: revolutionaries or secessionists?

    John Postill
    6 Nov 2014 | 4:43 am
    By Trent MacDonald This is an invited post to the freedom technologists series by Trent MacDonald. Trent is a PhD student at RMIT University, Melbourne. He is currently doing research on non-territorial governance, a type of governance that seeks to decouple political units from territories so that multiple jurisdictions can overlap in the same location. His Twitter handle is @trentjmacdonald. I am interested in the notion of ‘freedom technologists’ (Postill 2014) because I think I may have found a variety of freedom technologist in my own research: the cryptoanarchist. Cryptoanarchists…
  • 7. Journalists and indignados: the importance of being there

    John Postill
    8 Oct 2014 | 6:30 am
    In 2011, the young Spanish journalist Juanlu Sánchez (@juanlusanchez) covered the indignados (15M) movement from its very inception, spending many long hours at Madrid’s Puerta del Sol square getting to know the occupiers. In this adaptation of an interview with the documentary filmmaker Stephane Grueso (@fanetin) that took place in late 2011, Juanlu reflects on how he and other journalists (independent and mainstream, Spanish and foreign) covered the unfolding events on the ground. His story provides us with some tantalising glimpses into the complex relations that developed between…
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    American Journal of Physical Anthropology

  • Virtual Anthropology

    Gerhard W. Weber
    24 Nov 2014 | 2:27 am
    ABSTRACT Comparative morphology, dealing with the diversity of form and shape, and functional morphology, the study of the relationship between the structure and the function of an organism's parts, are both important subdisciplines in biological research. Virtual anthropology (VA) contributes to comparative morphology by taking advantage of technological innovations, and it also offers new opportunities for functional analyses. It exploits digital technologies and pools experts from different domains such as anthropology, primatology, medicine, paleontology, mathematics, statistics, computer…
  • Ancient DNA from the Schild site in Illinois: Implications for the Mississippian transition in the Lower Illinois River Valley

    Austin W. Reynolds, Jennifer A. Raff, Deborah A. Bolnick, Della C. Cook, Frederika A. Kaestle
    24 Nov 2014 | 2:25 am
    ABSTRACT Archaeologists have long debated whether rapid cultural change in the archaeological record is due to in situ developments, migration of a new group into the region, or the spread of new cultural practices into an area through existing social networks, with the local peoples adopting and adapting practices from elsewhere as they see fit (acculturation). Researchers have suggested each of these explanations for the major cultural transition that occurred at the beginning of the Mississippian period (AD 1050) across eastern North America. In this study, we used ancient DNA to test…
  • Mitochondrial DNA perspective of Serbian genetic diversity

    Slobodan Davidovic, Boris Malyarchuk, Jelena M. Aleksic, Miroslava Derenko, Vladanka Topalovic, Andrey Litvinov, Milena Stevanovic, Natasa Kovacevic-Grujicic
    24 Nov 2014 | 2:25 am
    ABSTRACT Although south-Slavic populations have been studied to date from various aspects, the population of Serbia, occupying the central part of the Balkan Peninsula, is still genetically understudied at least at the level of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation. We analyzed polymorphisms of the first and the second mtDNA hypervariable segments (HVS-I and HVS-II) and informative coding-region markers in 139 Serbians to shed more light on their mtDNA variability, and used available data on other Slavic and neighboring non-Slavic populations to assess their interrelations in a broader European…
  • Identifying and Interpreting Animal Bones, by April M. Beisaw. College Station, TX: Texas AS&M Press. 2013. 179 pp. ISBN978-1-62349-026-3. $35.00 (flexbound)

    20 Nov 2014 | 3:19 am
  • To meat or not to meat? New perspectives on Neanderthal ecology

    Luca Fiorenza, Stefano Benazzi, Amanda G. Henry, Domingo C. Salazar-García, Ruth Blasco, Andrea Picin, Stephen Wroe, Ottmar Kullmer
    19 Nov 2014 | 2:47 am
    ABSTRACT Neanderthals have been commonly depicted as top predators who met their nutritional needs by focusing entirely on meat. This information mostly derives from faunal assemblage analyses and stable isotope studies: methods that tend to underestimate plant consumption and overestimate the intake of animal proteins. Several studies in fact demonstrate that there is a physiological limit to the amount of animal proteins that can be consumed: exceeding these values causes protein toxicity that can be particularly dangerous to pregnant women and newborns. Consequently, to avoid food…
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    Anthropogenesis

  • Ancient Kostenki 14 (Markina Gora) DNA: A Glimpse into a Population on Its Way from America to Africa

    German Dziebel
    9 Nov 2014 | 9:41 pm
    Science DOI: 10.1126/science.aaa0114 Genomic Structure in Europeans Dating Back at Least 36,200 Years Andaine Seguin-Orlando, Thorfinn S. Korneliussen, Martin Sikora, Anna-Sapfo Malaspinas, Andrea Manica, Ida Moltke, Anders Albrechtsen, Amy Ko, Ashot Margaryan, Vyacheslav Moiseyev, Ted Goebel, Michael Westaway, David Lambert, Valeri Khartanovich, Jeffrey D. Wall, Philip R. Nigst, Robert A. Foley, Marta Mirazon Lahr, Rasmus Nielsen, Ludovic Orlando, and Eske Willerslev. The origin of contemporary Europeans remains contentious. We obtain a genome sequence from Kostenki 14 in European Russia…
  • Kunstkamera: News from Around the Web

    German Dziebel
    5 Nov 2014 | 10:32 am
    1. Patagonian Monsters. A new website run by Argentina-based Austin Whittall is a wealth of sharp analyses of human genetic variation from an intellectual point of view that’s close to out-of-America II. Whittall is critical of the mainstream interpretations of human genetic variation and explores the possibility of an early peopling of the Americas by Neandertals and /or Homo erectus and a back migration from America to Asia (here and here).The blog’s name is the reverse from the objective, formal and dispassionate content that the professional engineer Whittall produces…
  • Ancient Ust’-Ishim DNA as Seen From the Americas

    German Dziebel
    23 Oct 2014 | 12:02 pm
    Nature 514, 445–449 (23 October 2014) doi:10.1038/nature13810 Genome sequence of a 45,000-year-old modern human from western Siberia Qiaomei Fu, Heng Li, Priya Moorjani, Flora Jay, Sergey M. Slepchenko, Aleksei A. Bondarev, Philip L. F. Johnson, Ayinuer Aximu-Petri, Kay Prufer, Cesare de Filippo, Matthias Meyer, Nicolas Zwyns, Domingo C. Salazar-Garcıa, Yaroslav V. Kuzmin, Susan G. Keates, Pavel A. Kosintsev, Dmitry I. Razhev, Michael P. Richards, Nikolai V. Peristov, Michael Lachmann, Katerina Douka, Thomas F. G. Higham, Montgomery Slatkin, Jean-Jacques Hublin, David Reich, Janet…
  • Web Gems, November 22, 2013

    German Dziebel
    22 Nov 2013 | 7:01 am
    I’ve been monitoring global web responses to Raghavan et al.’s “Upper Palaeolithic Siberian Genome Reveals Dual Ancestry of Native Americans”that appear in the comments sections on Dienekes, Gene Expression and Eurogenes sites. The Web Gem Reward of this week goes to Kristiina from Finland who poignantly asks: “I would like someone to explain me why the ancient 15k Amerind admixture in Europeans is visible but the ancient massive East Asian admixture in Amerinds is not?” It’s remarkable that out of thousands of people who visit these sites daily and…
  • Ancient DNA from Mal’ta and Afontova Gora: A Full Account

    German Dziebel
    20 Nov 2013 | 12:29 pm
    Courtesy Alexander Kim, the long-awaited paper by the Eske Willerslev team became finally available to me. This is obviously not the last word on the subject of Amerindian origins, and the David Reich Lab has a different interpretation of ancient and modern DNA data, which is more consistent with an Amerindian-like admixture in West Eurasians. But Raghavan et al. 2013 is a fascinating end-of-the-year read that shows once again that science is like wine: it gets only better with age. Upper Palaeolithic Siberian Genome Reveals Dual Ancestry of Native Americans Maanasa Raghavan, Pontus Skoglund,…
 
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    BOAS Network

  • Dr. Bernard Comrie: Santa Barbara Symposium on Human Origins II

    BOAS
    15 Nov 2014 | 9:46 am
    BOAS Network presents: Santa Barbara Symposium on Human Origins II. Dr. Bernard Comrie, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Language and Prehistory: “Language and Prehistory: The Comparative Method.” Public Lectures, Saturday September 13, 2014. Click here for more talks from this symposium
  • Dr. John Shea: Santa Barbara Symposium on Human Origins II

    BOAS
    11 Nov 2014 | 12:59 pm
    BOAS Network presents: Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History Symposium on Human Origins II. Friday September 12, 2014. Morning Session: The Settlement of the Eurasia by Homo Sapiens with Dr. John Shea. One of the ways we learn about early human behavior is by doing it! John Shea uses the results of stone snapping and tool use experiments to help us improve archaeological methods for reconstructing human behavior through the analysis of stone tools. He studies human origins, with a focus on the Paleolithic period, and is investigating early hominid adaptive radiations, the origin of Homo…
  • Dr. Tom Higham: Santa Barbara Symposium on Human Origins II

    BOAS
    11 Nov 2014 | 12:54 pm
    BOAS Network presents: Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History Symposium on Human Origins II. Scholarly Symposia, Friday September 12, 2014. Morning Session: The Settlement of the Eurasia by Homo Sapiens. Dr. Tom Higham, Oxford University, presents “Time for Human Evolution.” Visit our Conference Page for more talks from this symposium.
  • Dr. Tim Denham: Santa Barbara Symposium on Human Origins II

    BOAS
    11 Nov 2014 | 12:48 pm
    BOAS Network presents: Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History Symposium on Human Origins II. Friday September 12, 2014. Afternoon Session with Dr. Tim Denham, Australian National University. Dr. Tim Denham is a particular expert on the highlands of Papua New Guinea, one of the “cradles of farming, where some of the world’s staple food plants were first domesticated.” He led a team whose research revealed that this area was one of a handful in the world where the “agricultural revolution” took place. From his website: “From a ‘Neolithic…
  • Dr. Michael Petraglia: SB Symposium on Human Origins II

    BOAS
    7 Nov 2014 | 11:38 am
    BOAS Network presents the Santa Barbara Symposium on Human Origins II at the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History. Morning Session: The Settlement of the Eurasia by Homo Sapiens. September 12, 2014. Dr. Michael Petraglia, Oxford University, presents “Human Origins and the Southern Dispersal Zone.”
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    The Path of The Sun

  • BONUS FOOTAGE NOW AVAILABLE, DISCOUNTS & GIFTS

    19 Nov 2014 | 12:47 pm
    BONUS FOOTAGEI am very happy to announce that the promised bonus footage for the Super Deluxe package is now available for streaming and download.The Path of the Sun bonus footage consists of interviews I conducted while filming Ayahausca Nature's Greatest Gift and Q'ero Mystics of Peru. During my time in Peru and filming back in the US during the Psychedemia conference I interviewed a total of 18 people. Interviews lasted 45 minutes to over 4 hours. This resulted in approximately 30 hours of raw footage. That footage was reduced to one hour for each of the two films. While all topics were…
  • ON CNN & TWITTER TONIGHT

    26 Oct 2014 | 1:59 pm
    SAFE & SUSTAINABLE AYAHUASCATonight on Lisa Ling's This is Life, a CNN series the medicinal brew Ayahuasca featured in part 2 of The Path of the Sun series is getting a full hour of national broadcasting attention due to it's potential medical benefits that are now getting attention. This follows on the heals of several well publicized news stories about hallucinogens that are making a comeback in psychotherapeutic research for addiction at NYU under Stephan Ross, PhD and for cancer related research at John's Hopkins under Roland Griffiths, PhD.In this episode…
  • BONUS FOOTAGE DELAY

    9 Oct 2014 | 8:47 am
    Hi all,I am busy at work assembling the bonus footage for distribution, but have missed the deadline.  My apologies.  Rest assured that it will be available soon and I promise it will be better than expected.  I appreciate your patience and will continue to provide updates.  I do not have a specific date when it will be ready, but it will be prior to the end of the month.  That's a guarantee.Best,Seti GershbergDirector/Producer
  • Bonus Material Timeline

    29 Sep 2014 | 6:20 pm
    Today was to be the day that I announced that bonus materials would be ready. However, I am delaying the announcement for 1 more week and I thank you for your patience. I have been spending the past weeks since the film's release on September 1, 2014 reviewing the interview footage from the film and creating what I call interview only movies. A question is asked and then it is answered exactly like it is during an interview. The material is excellent and instead of rushing to put something in your hands that is not up to the highest quality simply to meet a deadline is not something that I…
  • Review by Author Matthew J. Pallamary

    16 Sep 2014 | 3:28 pm
    Ayahausca Nature's Greatest Gift has received a review from author Matthew J. Pallamary.  He writes: "Ayahuasca Nature's Greatest Gift takes you into the heart of Ayahuasca shamanism and pulls aside the veil to provide valuable insight into the gifts that only a loving mother can give from those who know her intimately. There are lots of mysteries and misconceptions around the use of these sacred plants and their effects and there are many “sharks in the water” waiting to prey on the uninformed and starry-eyed innocents who are seeking a prehistoric spiritual path that precedes the…
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