Anthropology

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  • Body language: The interplay between positional behavior and gestural signaling in the genus Pan and its implications for language evolution

    American Journal of Physical Anthropology
    Lindsey W. Smith, Roberto A. Delgado
    7 Apr 2015 | 9:49 pm
    ABSTRACT ObjectivesThe gestural repertoires of bonobos and chimpanzees are well documented, but the relationship between gestural signaling and positional behavior (i.e., body postures and locomotion) has yet to be explored. Given that one theory for language evolution attributes the emergence of increased gestural communication to habitual bipedality, this relationship is important to investigate. Materials and MethodsIn this study, we examined the interplay between gestures, body postures, and locomotion in four captive groups of bonobos and chimpanzees using ad libitum and focal video…
  • Large heads, narrow pelvises and difficult childbirth in humans: Adaptations in human morphology explain why

    Anthropology News -- ScienceDaily
    22 Apr 2015 | 7:42 am
    The size of the neonatal skull is large relative to the dimensions of the birth canal in the female pelvis. This is the reason why childbirth is slower and more difficult in humans than in most other primates. Scientists have identified adaptations in the morphology of the human body, which were unknown so far, a new study shows.
  • Getting a better grasp of primate grip

    Anthropology News -- ScienceDaily
    20 Apr 2015 | 11:44 am
    Scientists are coming to grips with the superior grasping ability of humans and other primates throughout history. In a new study, a research team found that even the oldest known human ancestors may have had precision grip capabilities comparable to modern humans. This includes Australopithecus afarensis, which appears in the fossil record a million years before the first evidence of stone tools.
  • What the life of a pair of flip-flops can teach us about migration, inequality and studying up

    antropologi.info - anthropology in the news blog
    admin
    11 Nov 2014 | 3:04 am
    Photo: Cíntia Regina, flickr During the recent (nearly) two years, I've been interviewing researchers that are part of the research project Overheating. The three crises of globalisation: An anthropological history of the early 21st century at the University of Oslo, starting with Thomas Hylland Eriksen: Anthropologists to study humanity’s biggest crises. I also interviewed most of the researchers that were invited to hold seminars. One of the texts that for me was most fun to write was about the research by sociologist Caroline Knowles. For seven years, she has been following a…
  • Neandertal Post-Mortem Modification

    Anthropology.net
    Kambiz Kamrani
    14 Apr 2015 | 4:07 pm
    Cut marks are observed on the femur of the Neanderthal child. Credit: M.D. Garralda et al A study published in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology has for the first time analysed the fragments of three individuals found between ’67 and ’80 at the French site, Marillac, dating back 57,600 years ago. These are an incomplete diaphysis of a right radius, another of a left fibula and the majority of a right femur. The latter belonged to a child. Neandertals from this region of Poitou-Charentes cut, beat and fractured the bones of their recently deceased companions, as…
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    Anthropology.net

  • Were Protoaurignacian’s Modern Humans or Neandertals?

    Kambiz Kamrani
    23 Apr 2015 | 3:06 pm
    3D models of the two teeth. (Daniele Panetta, CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology) Many cultures existed in Europe about 40-45,000 years ago. About 42,000 years ago, in southern Europe, the Protoaurignacian developed and the culture that followed marked a turning point in modern humanity. They made the earliest instruments, the earliest art, and possibly the first representation of a human figure. It has been hard to conclusively prove that the Protoaurignacians actually were human since Neandertals were just ending their occupation of Europe during this time frame. In fact, only three…
  • Ancient Human Footprints Along Ileret, Kenya Lakeside

    Kambiz Kamrani
    19 Apr 2015 | 3:56 pm
    An ancient footprint from Ileret, Kenya: one of several sets showing evidence of Homo erectus males travelling in groups. In the late 2000s, 22 footprints were found near Ileret, Kenya. These prints are beleive to be 1.5 million years old. The study documenting this find focused on the anatomy of these footprints; Homo erectus who ambulated much like modern humans. Neil Roach, from the AMNH, returned to Ileret and have found more footprints — about 100. The findings were presented at this week’s annual meeting of the Paleoanthropology Society in San Francisco. These prints…
  • Neandertal Post-Mortem Modification

    Kambiz Kamrani
    14 Apr 2015 | 4:07 pm
    Cut marks are observed on the femur of the Neanderthal child. Credit: M.D. Garralda et al A study published in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology has for the first time analysed the fragments of three individuals found between ’67 and ’80 at the French site, Marillac, dating back 57,600 years ago. These are an incomplete diaphysis of a right radius, another of a left fibula and the majority of a right femur. The latter belonged to a child. Neandertals from this region of Poitou-Charentes cut, beat and fractured the bones of their recently deceased companions, as…
  • One of Lucy’s Vertebrae is a Baboon’s?

    Kambiz Kamrani
    11 Apr 2015 | 5:19 pm
    One of these vertebrae does not belong to Lucy (Image: Dave Einsel/Getty) Well this is kind of embarrassing but inconsequential… Gary Sawyer and Mike Smith at the AMNH began a reconstruction of Lucy with help from Scott Williams from NYU and noticed that one of the vertebra fragments is smaller than the other! A comparative study to other animal’s vertebrae show that it more closely resembles a baboon’s vertebrae.  This analysis will be presented at a meeting of the Paleoanthropology Society in San Francisco next week. The researchers confirm that the other 88 fossil…
  • Two Ancient Human Fossils from Tam Pa Ling, Laos

    Kambiz Kamrani
    11 Apr 2015 | 5:06 pm
    Researchers found an ancient human skull, left, with modern characteristics, and a human jaw, right, with modern and archaic traits, in the same cave in northern Laos. Both artifacts date to 46,000 to 63,000 years ago. Credit: Fabrice Demeter A human skull found in 2009 and a jaw discovered in late 2010 from cave site known as Tam Pa Ling, Laos is the oldest modern human fossil found in Southeast Asia. We knew this back in a 2012 PNAS paper. The discovery pushes back modern human migration to that region by about 20,000 years earlier than thought; some 46,000 to 63,000 years ago. But what…
 
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    Savage Minds

  • Savage Minds Reader Survey Results Part 1: Demographics

    Kerim
    25 Apr 2015 | 3:33 am
    First of all, a big “Thank you!” to everyone who responded to the Savage Minds Reader Survey. Over the one month the survey was up Google tells us that we had 31,003 people visit the site1, but of those only 6,255 were returning visitors. It is that second number we want to target, since we aren’t really interested in the people who randomly end up on the site because they are Googling “jewish glam rock” or “origin sexy librarian” (although we’re happy if they become regular readers after ending up here). The fact that 430 people responded to…
  • Puppy-Dog Eyes of Science

    John hartigan
    24 Apr 2015 | 4:00 am
    “Scientists say…” It’s interesting what natural science research starts making the rounds on social media. Mostly on diet or health broadly, and increasingly concerning climate change. On rare occasion—as over the past few days—some reports surface that offer insight into the circulating clutter itself, as in “cute dog” photos. In this instance, they’re opportunities to glimpse changing understandings of big topics, like domestication and evolution. Links for two articles recently popped up in my Twitter feed: “The Science of Puppy-Dog Eyes” (NYTimes, 4/21/14) and “The…
  • This Earth Day, read about the anthropocene at Open Anthropology

    Rex
    22 Apr 2015 | 2:17 pm
    As our guest blogger John Hartigan has show, 2014 was the year of the Anthropocene for anthropology. Multispecies? So 2010. Ontology? So 2013. This Earth Day is a great time to start thinking about the anthropocene — and to make sure that concern and attention to climate change is more than just a fad for anthropology. A great place to start is Open Anthropology’s current issue on the Anthropocene. in the past Savage Minds has not been kind (at all) to Open Anthropology. This is the AAA’s faux-open access journal that present themed ‘best-of’ issues that are…
  • Why Anthropologists Should Embrace BDS: SMOPS 14

    Rex
    21 Apr 2015 | 9:49 pm
    I’m happy to announce the next number of the Savage Minds Occasional Paper Series, “Why Anthropologists Should Embrace BDS”. This number of the Savage Minds Occasional Paper Series is unusual for two reasons. First, this is the first SMOPS that is not a reprint of early pieces in the history of anthropology. Secondly, I am not the author of this piece, although the authors have assigned their copyright to me in order to give this piece a Creative Commons license. This piece presents in expanded and revised form material which originally appeared on the Savage Minds blog in…
  • Cultural Evolution As Dialectic

    John hartigan
    21 Apr 2015 | 4:00 am
    Are cultural anthropologists going to get serious soon about evolution? When I first learned anthropology, back in the mid-1980s, “cultural evolution” (Lewis Morgan and E.B. Tylor) was always an early lesson in intro courses, basically on how not to think about culture. Or as an illustration of European ethnocentrism, with their culture as the more complex evolutionary development from simpler, primitive societies. But now I teach Darwin’s Origin of the Species in my intro grad theory course and to my undergraduates, as well. There’s no better way to engage the importance of yet…
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    Anthropology News -- ScienceDaily

  • Large heads, narrow pelvises and difficult childbirth in humans: Adaptations in human morphology explain why

    22 Apr 2015 | 7:42 am
    The size of the neonatal skull is large relative to the dimensions of the birth canal in the female pelvis. This is the reason why childbirth is slower and more difficult in humans than in most other primates. Scientists have identified adaptations in the morphology of the human body, which were unknown so far, a new study shows.
  • Calculating how the Pacific was settled: Sailing against prevailing winds, spotting big islands

    22 Apr 2015 | 5:40 am
    Using statistics that describe how an infectious disease spreads, an anthropologist analyzed different theories of how people first settled islands of the vast Pacific between 3,500 and 900 years ago. Adrian Bell found the two most likely strategies were to travel mostly against prevailing winds and seek easily seen islands, not necessarily the nearest islands.
  • Proteins that control anxiety in humans and cause insects to shed their skins have common origin

    21 Apr 2015 | 5:55 pm
    Researchers have discovered that a protein which controls anxiety in humans has the same molecular ancestor as one which causes insects to molt when they outgrow their skins. Studies on sea urchins provided the missing link because they have a protein with elements common to those in both humans and insects and reveal a common ancestry hundreds of millions of years ago.
  • Getting a better grasp of primate grip

    20 Apr 2015 | 11:44 am
    Scientists are coming to grips with the superior grasping ability of humans and other primates throughout history. In a new study, a research team found that even the oldest known human ancestors may have had precision grip capabilities comparable to modern humans. This includes Australopithecus afarensis, which appears in the fossil record a million years before the first evidence of stone tools.
  • How ancient species survived or died off in their old Kentucky home

    16 Apr 2015 | 12:53 pm
    Researchers at an old geological site talk 'dirt' about how Ice Age climate change led to the extinction of mammoths and mastodons, but to the evolution and survival of bison, deer and other present-day species.
 
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    Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog

  • PCA and natural selection

    Dienekes
    21 Apr 2015 | 11:21 am
    arXiv:1504.04543 [q-bio.PE]Detecting genomic signatures of natural selection with principal component analysis: application to the 1000 Genomes data Nicolas Duforet-Frebourg et al.(Submitted on 8 Apr 2015)Large-scale genomic data offers the perspective to decipher the genetic architecture of natural selection. To characterize natural selection, various analytical methods for detecting candidate genomic regions have been developed. We propose to perform genome-wide scans of natural selection using principal component analysis. We show that the common Fst index of genetic differentiation…
  • mtDNA of Alaskan Eskimos

    Dienekes
    18 Apr 2015 | 11:00 pm
    AJPA DOI: 10.1002/ajpa.22750 Mitochondrial diversity of Iñupiat people from the Alaskan North Slope provides evidence for the origins of the Paleo- and Neo-Eskimo peoples  Jennifer A. Raff et al.ABSTRACT Objectives: All modern Iñupiaq speakers share a common origin, the result of a recent (∼800 YBP) and rapid trans-Arctic migration by the Neo-Eskimo Thule, who replaced the previous Paleo-Eskimo inhabitants of the region. Reduced mitochondrial haplogroup diversity in the eastern Arctic supports the archaeological hypothesis that the migration occurred in an eastward direction. We…
  • Haplogroup G1, Y-chromosome mutation rate and migrations of Iranic speakers

    Dienekes
    13 Apr 2015 | 1:33 pm
    The origin of Iranian speakers is a big puzzle as in ancient times there were two quite different groups of such speakers: nomadic steppe people such as Scythians and settled farmers such as Persians and Medes.I am guessing that the story of Iranian origins will only be solved in correlation to their Indo-Aryan brethren and their more distant Indo-European relations.Clearly, G1 cannot be Proto-Indo-European as it has a rather limited distribution in Eurasia, but it could very well have been a marker of a subset of Indo-Europeans. If it was present in ancestral Iranians, then this would…
  • Neandertal flutes debunked

    Dienekes
    13 Apr 2015 | 6:53 am
    Royal Society Open Science DOI: 10.1098/rsos.140022 ‘Neanderthal bone flutes’: simply products of Ice Age spotted hyena scavenging activities on cave bear cubs in European cave bear dens Cajus G. Diedrich Punctured extinct cave bear femora were misidentified in southeastern Europe (Hungary/Slovenia) as ‘Palaeolithic bone flutes’ and the ‘oldest Neanderthal instruments’. These are not instruments, nor human made, but products of the most important cave bear scavengers of Europe, hyenas. Late Middle to Late Pleistocene (Mousterian to Gravettian) Ice Age spotted hyenas of Europe…
  • Happy Easter

    Dienekes
    11 Apr 2015 | 5:30 pm
 
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    antropologi.info - anthropology in the news blog

  • Anthropologists on deported migrants, unusual bureaucrats, and the thriving solidarity economy in Greece

    admin
    12 Apr 2015 | 6:13 am
    While I am trying to get back into the blogging business, here three selected pieces that I've written recently for the University of Oslo. Two of them are accounts on somehow positive change that is happening. Many anthropologists have contributed to the understanding of the economic crisis in many parts of the world during the recent years, see among others the earlier posts "Use Anthropology to Build A Human Economy" or "Similar to the Third World debt crisis" - David Graeber on 'Occupy Wall Street'. But few studies deal with the ways people tried to create…
  • Two new anthropology blogs from Norway: Thomas Hylland Eriksen and Sindre Bangstad

    admin
    11 Nov 2014 | 7:31 am
    Lots of new anthropology blogs have been started up recently, most of them have made it into the overviews here at antropologi.info: the anthropology blog newspaper http://www.antropologi.info/blog/ and the - I think - more reader-friendly anthropology blog news ticker http://www.antropologi.info/feeds/anthropology/ (if not, let me know!) Now, I'd like to mention especially two blogs. The first one is Thomas Hylland Eriksen's blog at http://thomashyllanderiksen.net He is one of the most visible anthropologists in the public, he set up his first website already back in prehistoric 1996…
  • What the life of a pair of flip-flops can teach us about migration, inequality and studying up

    admin
    11 Nov 2014 | 3:04 am
    Photo: Cíntia Regina, flickr During the recent (nearly) two years, I've been interviewing researchers that are part of the research project Overheating. The three crises of globalisation: An anthropological history of the early 21st century at the University of Oslo, starting with Thomas Hylland Eriksen: Anthropologists to study humanity’s biggest crises. I also interviewed most of the researchers that were invited to hold seminars. One of the texts that for me was most fun to write was about the research by sociologist Caroline Knowles. For seven years, she has been following a…
  • 10 years antropologi.info and what about the future?

    admin
    12 Sep 2014 | 3:30 pm
    Although it was ten years ago I started this blog and anthropology portal, I am not sure if there is something to celebrate. The website has been more or less dormant for nearly two years now. Despite several attempts to start up blogging again, I failed to keep it going. But now, because of the anniversary, what about starting another attempt? Life is more or less upside down after I went to Cairo, Egypt, three years ago and got stuck here. It was supposed to be a short trip, but I ended up getting married here. That was the most wonderful thing that ever happened to me. But I still have to…
  • "Religion in Digital Games": Relaunch of Open Access journal "Online"

    admin
    28 Feb 2014 | 3:54 am
    "Second Life is their only chance to participate in religious rituals": This seven year old post about the research by anthropologist Tom Boellstorff on the virtual world Second Life came into my mind when I heard about the new special issue "Religion in Digital Games" of the interdisciplinary Open access journal "Online. Heidelberg Journal of Religions on the Internet". The journal is published by the Institute of Religious Studies at the University of Heidelberg and has just been relaunched and redesigned. Religion in online games seems to be still a new topic in the university world.
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    Material World

  • Social Museum Seoul: Review

    Haidy Geismar
    23 Apr 2015 | 6:24 pm
    Jane Yoonjeong Rhee,Slade School of Fine Art, UCL   “The Social Museum is a democratic space of civil society that envisions a neutral zone of values. We begin a chapter jointly to sympathise with our shared time, space, values, heritage, and the sense of indebtedness to the society.” (Translated from the Exhibition Text) Social Museum is an annual conference that takes the museum as its conceptual parameters to capture and re-evaluate the urgencies in our society. The project is funded by Seoul City Hall and is part of the research program for the governmental plan of building Seoul…
  • World Museums: Geographies and Genealogies

    Haidy Geismar
    26 Mar 2015 | 2:18 am
    Via Felix Driver, Royal Holloway May 19, 2015 World Museums: Geographies and Genealogies  Institute of Historical Research, Senate House, 5.15pm In conversation: Anthony Shelton, Director of the Museum of Anthropology and Professor of Anthropology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada Annie E. Coombes, Professor of Material and Visual Culture & Director of the Peltz Gallery, Birkbeck, University of London. This HARC Dialogues event will focus on the idea of the world museum, as expressed originally in the concept of the universal or encyclopaedic museum, and reinvented for…
  • Crowd-sourcing and Crowd-funding our human past

    Haidy Geismar
    21 Mar 2015 | 7:51 am
    The MicroPasts project, an AHRC collaborative UCL-British Museum Project, uses web-based technologies to foster collaborations between researchers based in higher education and heritage institutions and members of the public to study the human past. Together, the project team has created new open archaeological data via crowdsourcing (crowdsourced.micropasts.org) and arranged the micro-financing of community archaeology and community history projects (crowdfunded.micropasts.org). The MicroPasts end of first phase funding conference will be held at the Royal Geographical Society on the 31st…
  • Knyttan and the question of design autonomy

    Haidy Geismar
    20 Mar 2015 | 2:47 am
    Lydia Maria Arantes | Visiting Researcher, Anthropology, UCL   source: www.somersethouse.org.uk/visual-arts/knyttan-factory-of-the-future ]   Have you ever wanted to design your own scarf, jumper or even tie, but can’t knit?‘ read the first sentence on the Somerset House website introducting Knyttan – Factory of the Future , currently based in the New Wing. Despite already knowing how to knit, I was nonetheless interested to what extent visitors of Knyttan would be granted involvement in the design process. Having been doing research on (hand) knitting for the past…
  • Cyclone Pam – Support Vanuatu

    Haidy Geismar
    18 Mar 2015 | 2:15 am
    Haidy Geismar, UCL As I’m sure you are all aware, last week Vanuatu was devastated by Cyclone Pam, battering the country with winds of over 270 mph. The storm knocked out the country’s telecommunications and transport infrastructure and now, just a few days later, it is estimated that more then 70% of the population are left homeless, without adequate drinking water, and without food. The long term prospects for food security are also bad as most of the garden crops that people live off have been destroyed. President Baldwin Lonsdale has announced that the storm had “wiped…
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    Museum Anthropology

  • Hopi Tribe and HARP File Lawsuit in France to Stop Future Sales of Sacred Objects

    23 Apr 2015 | 8:48 am
    Native News Online, April 12, 2015 The Hopi Tribal Council and the Holocaust Art Restitution Project (HARP) filed a lawsuit in France to appeal a recent decision by the French “Conseil des Ventes” (“Board of Auction Sales”), an administrative body in charge of regulating and supervising auction sales on the French market. The announcement of the lawsuit filing was made jointly by Herman G.
  • Musuem Anthropology Facebook Page: Musuem Dance Off

    21 Apr 2015 | 8:46 am
    Be sure to visit the CMA's Facebook page to stay updated on the "Musuem Dance Off!"  Like our page to see more news from the field of museum anthropology right in your newsfeed! 
  • NAGPRA Grants Awarded to Eight Tribes

    17 Apr 2015 | 4:19 pm
    The National Park Service today announced the award of eight Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) Repatriation grants totaling $74,348. The grants will assist in the repatriation of individuals and sacred objects, objects of cultural patrimony and funerary objects back to the tribes. “The work funded by these grants is a step toward addressing past violations of
  • NATHPO Accepting Applications for Power of Preservation

    30 Mar 2015 | 10:32 am
    NATHPO is accepting applications for the Power of Preservation in Indian Country leadership seminar to be offered May 31-June 4, 2015, at the National Conservation and Training Center in Shepherdstown, West Virginia. Power of Preservation Goals: •       To identify and train current and potential leaders who have the ability to dramatically increase their effectiveness in their communities
  • MUAN 38.1 "Continued Conversations" Web-Exclusive Content: James Dixon Interview Part 1

    20 Mar 2015 | 12:19 pm
    In Musuem Anthropology 38.1, co-editors Maxine McBrinn and Tony Chavarria conducted interviews with museum anthropologists working within the university setting. This web-exclusive content adds to their collection of interviews published in the journal.  This interview is with Dr. James Dixon, Director, Maxwell Museum of Anthropology and Professor of Anthropology, College of Arts and Sciences
 
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    Kimberly Christian's Garcinia Cambogia

  • Top 5 Fish Oil Supplements as Recommended by AlivebyNature.com

    admin
    29 Mar 2015 | 12:10 pm
    Glutamine is easily the most the most abundant amino acids in requires. The amount of the usb ports that you have now in method is mainly stored inside your skeletal muscles and plasma television. The rest with it is seen in your lungs which will be the it is originally done. It is released during throughout the stress, as an example during a hardcore workout. It’s during this period that is necessary to supplement extra sources of glutamine for the body can’t synthesize consequently it fulfill those demands. Never attend a party feeling hungry. Bring a snack to work and show it…
  • Pure Forloskin: How To Buy It

    admin
    15 Dec 2014 | 11:43 am
    Weight Loss is certainly an obsession for millions. What is the best way to shed pounds? How can I lose weight quickly? What method can help me lose surplus weight? These burning questions keep many of us awake at nighttime. This article will explore some of probably the most frequently asked questions associated with reduction. For most of us, we need to have answers to our questions before deciding which approach will yield the outcomes. The following thing can need test is consume a reasonable diet while choosing HCA. Eating appropriate portions of healthier foodstuffs results in a steady…
  • Forloskin – Your Lesser Known Fat Burning Solultion

    admin
    2 Dec 2014 | 2:50 pm
    Being in your teens is demanding. Not only you have to manage your busy study schedule, you have to cope having a changing body as well as raging hormones which cause damage to your skin. I remember when I was a teenager, method I look is the ideal concern for me. When my acne problems started, I remember being feeling down and depressed most of the time. The most dreaded time is always attend any social functionings. My time was mostly consumed with how help reduce my teenage acne easily. If a person trying to shed weight, pests away . an approach to fit exercise seamlessly towards your…
  • Facts About alivebynature Weight-Loss Product

    admin
    11 Nov 2014 | 3:15 pm
    Eczema is actually definitely an inflammation of the skin wherein the patches of skin may be red, itchy and slough off. The cause of this disease is unknown as it can certainly occur on any part of the body but is typically found on an arms, knees, elbows and knees. For anybody who is looking for natural treating of eczema, it can be be serious. But some in the most common places you’re able to find things for these natural remedies, are place like the grocery store, vitamin stores such as alivebynature, other sorts of stores. Applying witch hazel towards affected area a few times a day…
  • 3 Raw Food Diet Secrets!

    admin
    24 Oct 2014 | 3:11 pm
    When Janet Lindvall sat in front of her computer, food obvious that she needed lower belly fat. It was an ugly sight to see rolls of fat bulging out from her ab. Fact 9: Metabolic disorders will cause weight realize. Diabetes and hypo thyroid are the most widespread. You need to be medically examined if believe any hang ups. As the cat ages, toxin damage occurs and the best way to make plant based protein supplement cat healthy is by supplying all of them herbs and anti-oxidants like quercitin and rutin sustain their energy. So do you want to get large, beautiful muscles? A person wish…
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    Somatosphere

  • Inhabitable Worlds: Troubling disability, debility, and ability narratives by Michele Friedner

    Michele Friedner
    20 Apr 2015 | 7:00 am
    This series will interrogate the theoretical tools and approaches that scholars bring to the study of disability in the social sciences. Scholars have recently turned a focused attention on different states of bodily and sensorial experience; we aim to connect these concerns with questions about how people experiencing such differences create inhabitable worlds. In doing so, we draw inspiration from Martin Heidegger’s provocative neologism “worlding.” Building on Heidegger, Mei Zhan states that worlds are “emergent socialities entangled in dynamic imaginaries of pasts, futures, and…
  • Book Forum—Lisa Stevenson’s “Life Beside Itself: Imagining Care in the Canadian Arctic” by Eugene Raikhel

    Eugene Raikhel
    15 Apr 2015 | 6:11 am
    For our latest installment in the book forum series, we bring you a series of commentaries on Lisa Stevenson’s Life Beside Itself: Imagining Care in the Canadian Arctic (University of California Press, 2014).  As it takes us across the conceptual grounds of governance, (post)colonialism, biopolitics, violence, and suicide, this book illuminates care as an object of study in a way that points to the remarkable care of Lisa Stevenson’s ethnography and writing.  We hope that you enjoy these engagements with the book, as well as Lisa Stevenson’s reply.   Comments on Lisa…
  • In the Journals, April 2015 – Part I by Elizabeth Lewis

    Elizabeth Lewis
    10 Apr 2015 | 11:48 am
    Here is the first installment of our coverage of April journal articles. Enjoy! Critical Public Health The Transitional Dynamics of Caloric Ecosystems: Changes in the Food Supply Around the World Sanjay Basu Changes to the global food supply have been characterized by greater availability of edible oils, sweeteners, and meats – a profound ‘nutrition transition’ associated with rising obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Through an analysis of three longitudinal databases of food supply, sales, and economics across the period 1961–2010, we observed that the change in…
  • Nicolas Langlitz’s Neuropsychedelia: The Revival of Hallucinogen Research Since the Decade of the Brain by Meg Stalcup

    Meg Stalcup
    8 Apr 2015 | 7:00 am
    Neuropsychedelia: The Revival of Hallucinogen Research Since the Decade of the Brain by Nicolas Langlitz University of California Press, 2012, 336 pages. Humphry Osmond wrote to Aldous Huxley in 1956 proposing the term “psychedelic,” coined from two Greek words to mean “mind manifesting.” The scholars, one a psychiatrist and the other a celebrated novelist and philosopher, were exuberant about the potential of drugs for accessing the mind. Huxley favored a phrase from William Blake: If the doors of perception were cleansed everything would appear to man as it is, infinite. He…
  • Kristin Peterson’s Speculative Markets: Drug Circuits and Derivative Life in Nigeria by Javier Lezaun

    Javier Lezaun
    6 Apr 2015 | 7:00 am
    Speculative Markets: Drug Circuits and Derivative Life in Nigeria by Kristin Peterson Duke University Press, 2014, 256 pages. Chemical Arbitrage We tend to think of pharmaceuticals as chemical matter caught up in complicated legal and economic relationships, but it is probably more useful to think of them as legal artifacts oriented towards a potential (but by no means guaranteed) biochemical fulfillment. Up until they enter our bodies, when they are being discovered and developed, patented, registered, packaged, sold and bought, pharmaceuticals trade in promises of therapeutic and financial…
 
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    Visual Anthropology of Japan - 日本映像人類学

  • 48

    19 Apr 2015 | 4:04 am
  • 桜 2015: This Year's Cherry Blossoms

    17 Apr 2015 | 1:32 am
    Rainy and cold weather didn't make for the best of ohanami this year. Here are some lazy yet beautiful shots from outside my window... See previous sakura-related posts on VAOJ: Spring 2010Spring 2011Spring 2012 pt.1Spring 2012 pt.2Spring 2012 pt.3Spring 2013 pt. 1Spring 2013 pt. 2Spring 2013 pt. 3Spring 2014 pt. 1Spring 2014 pt. 2
  • "Documentary on Japanese ‘war brides’ is gaining steam"

    14 Apr 2015 | 8:16 pm
    Photo borrowed from http://www.fallsevengetupeight.com/Story from The Japan Times On-line, 4/8/15. Three women (Kathryn Tolbert, Lucy Craft and Karen Kasmauski) — all first-born daughters of Japanese war brides who immigrated to the U.S. in the 1950s to wed Americans — have gotten together to make “Fall Seven Times, Get Up Eight,” a 20-minute documentary about an overlooked slice of life in America’s history. You’d think the existing Japanese communities in the U.S. would have welcomed with open arms the roughly 50,000 Japanese women who immigrated after World War II but, as it…
  • "British filmmaker sounds out Japan"

    13 Apr 2015 | 10:31 pm
    Sound is becoming more and more important within the realm of visual anthropology. The controlling of sound quality in both recording and editing is important and challenging. But some projects are about sound alone without any visual aspect (except for a black screen and/or one's own imagination). For example in 2009 Filmmaker and Sound & Vision Specialist Amanda Belantara produced "Ears Are Dazzled, Touched by Sound." She describes the project: A collective exploration of the sounds that surround us, this film features sounds and images inspired by sound diaries kept by local people in…
  • "Facial recognition system sends warning emails to families of pachinko addicts"

    4 Apr 2015 | 10:27 pm
    Story from Japan Today, 4/3/15: For a country that doesn’t have any businesses officially classified as “casinos,” Japan has a ton of places to gamble. By far the most common are pachinko parlors, which you can find within a short walk of just about every major train station in Tokyo and Japan’s other large cities. But with so many places to gamble, and many of them allowing customers to purchase the balls used to play for as little as one yen (less than a penny) each, it’s easy to get sucked into the siren song of the pachinko parlor. Seeking to help gamblers keep their wagers…
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    Glossographia

  • Where I’ve been (and will continue to be)

    schrisomalis
    24 Apr 2015 | 7:46 am
    For those of you wondering where I’ve been, here’s the stack of grading I just received on Tuesday. It took me the better part of an hour just to get it sorted out the way I like it. Staples removed, paper clips removed, binder clips added, collated with all of the previous comments I’ve made on earlier drafts. I also have the students write up a list of edits that made just as bullet points. 29 papers, ranging in length from 21 to 77 pages. So classes are done, but this stack is probably a good 30 hours of work and these are papers I’ve already read once before.
  • Language and Societies abstracts, vol. 7 (2015)

    schrisomalis
    6 Apr 2015 | 6:05 am
    The abstracts below are summaries of papers by junior scholars from the 2015 edition of my course, Language and Societies, and presented at the course blog of the same name. The authors are undergraduate and graduate students in anthropology and linguistics at Wayne State University. Over the next few weeks, some students will be posting links to PDF versions of their final papers below their abstracts. Comments and questions are extremely welcome, especially at this critical juncture over the next week, when the authors are making final revisions to their papers. Kat Slocum: Greensky Hill…
  • Call for Papers: Strange Science: Anthropological Encounters with the Fringe

    schrisomalis
    19 Mar 2015 | 5:30 am
    Call for Papers, 2015 American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting, Denver, Colorado (Nov. 18-22, 2015) Strange Science: Anthropological Encounters with the Fringe Anthropology has a long history of interactions with non-mainstream or pseudoscientific ideas. In our scholarship, classrooms, and public outreach, we are frequently confronted by advocates of ideas far beyond mainstream scientific understandings. Some of these ideas are directly challenged by anthropological data, such as ‘scientific’ racism, intelligent design, hyperdiffusionism, ancient aliens, 2012 millenarianism,…
  • Why adjunct labor matters to all of us

    schrisomalis
    25 Feb 2015 | 6:12 am
    Today is National Adjunct Walkout Day, and if National Anthropology Day (from my last post) is not going to become a statutory holiday, you can be doubly sure that this one won’t either.   It has come about in order to raise awareness of and provoke action against a serious problem: the working conditions of adjunct faculty in academia.  Along with organizations like the New Faculty Majority, the aim of NAWD is to highlight the low pay, lack of benefits, and insecure employment of most of the people who teach college students today. I, along with a significant but declining number of…
  • How and why (not) to go to grad school (Happy National Anthropology Day!)

    schrisomalis
    19 Feb 2015 | 6:15 am
    Today, Feb. 19, is National Anthropology Day.  Now, you may not have previously heard of this hallowed waypoint in the seasonal cycle, and the likelihood that you’ll see Hallmark picking up on this is close to zero, but nevertheless, here it is. In honor of this most glorious occasion, I will be presenting a talk I’ve given many times before, in various forms, entitled ‘How and why (not) to go to grad school’, in this case, at a seminar sponsored by the Wayne State Anthropology Learning Community.  (By the way, in case you were wondering, learning communities, when…
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    media/anthropology

  • 19. Freedoms and liberties in anthropological perspective

    John Postill
    21 Apr 2015 | 3:46 am
    This is nineteenth post in the Freedom technologists series. Via St Andrews Centre for Cosmopolitan Studies. The Centre is pleased to announce a forthcoming conference on Liberties and Freedoms organised with the assistance of the Ladislav Holy Trust. (May 31st – 2nd June 2013). Freedoms and liberties have been a theme of perennial concern across a range of human science disciplines – philosophy, history and political science – but curiously to a much lesser degree in anthropology. However, well-known anthropologists such as Boas, Malinowski and Leach have all written on the topic.
  • 18. Political technologists and civil society

    John Postill
    20 Apr 2015 | 2:31 am
    By Muzammil M. Hussain This is the eighteenth post in the Freedom technologists series. The following are some passages taken (with permission) from chapter 4 of Hussain, M. M. (2014). Securing Technologies of Freedom after the Arab Spring: Policy Entrepreneurship and Norms Consolidation Practices in Internet Freedom Promotion (Doctoral dissertation (Ph.D.) — University of Washington). https://dlib.lib.washington.edu/researchworks/handle/1773/26059 This quote captures the gist of Hussain’s ‘political technologists’ concept: I focus on the community of technology designers…
  • 17. Digital rights in Southeast Asia and beyond: a review of RightsCon 2015

    John Postill
    31 Mar 2015 | 7:45 am
    Update 1 April 2015: See also PDF version. Last week I was in Manila to attend the 4th meeting of the RightsCon series, held on 24-25 March 2015. This series of conferences seeks ‘to advance solutions to human rights challenges by concentrating on the possibilities within the tech sector’. The Manila conference was organised by Access, a digital rights NGO, in partnership with Engage Media and the Foundation for Media Alternatives. As stated on the conference website, the first ever RightsCon event to be held in Southeast Asia set out to pursue the following goals: • Protecting…
  • 16. A letter from Jakarta

    John Postill
    21 Mar 2015 | 8:22 am
    Many years ago, in 1987, I left Madrid and came to Jakarta to become a journalist. For about a year, I was a trainee at Tempo magazine and a stringer with Spain’s national newsagency, EFE. I lived with local host families and learned reasonably good Indonesian, but couldn’t quite figure out Indonesia. So I decided to become an anthropologist. (I was also a lousy journalist, too laid-back, or so I gathered from one of my mentors, the poet and journalist Goenawan Mohamad). After a long detour, I am back in Jakarta. This time as an anthropologist. I am still trying to figure out…
  • 15. Location technologists: the politics of digital media in a ‘special region’ of Indonesia

    John Postill
    16 Mar 2015 | 6:16 am
    Chapter proposal to Location Technologies in International Context, Rowan Wilken (Swinburne Uni of Tech), Gerard Goggin (U of Sydney) & Heather Horst (RMIT), eds. John Postill RMIT University 16 March 2015 As noted in the book’s Introduction, there is a growing technical literature on the proliferation of ‘location technologies’, particularly in North America and Europe (e.g. Goswami 2012, Williams et al 2011). Largely missing from this literature, however, is a conceptual vocabulary that can place these and other location technologies in different cultural and political contexts,…
 
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