Anthropology

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  • ISIS Destruction of Antiques an Opportunity for Education, Say Archaeologists

    anthropology - Yahoo News Search Results
    27 Feb 2015 | 8:50 am
    Two Cornell University experts in anthropology and archaeology respond to the recent video released by ISIS showing the destruction of unique and important archaeological artifacts in the Mosul Museum.
  • mtDNA from Lengyel culture in Poland

    Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog
    Dienekes
    2 Mar 2015 | 11:00 am
    PLoS ONE 10(2): e0118316. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0118316 Between the Baltic and Danubian Worlds: The Genetic Affinities of a Middle Neolithic Population from Central Poland Wiesław Lorkiewicz et al. For a long time, anthropological and genetic research on the Neolithic revolution in Europe was mainly concentrated on the mechanism of agricultural dispersal over different parts of the continent. Recently, attention has shifted towards population processes that occurred after the arrival of the first farmers, transforming the genetically very distinctive early Neolithic Linear Pottery Culture…
  • Climate-change clues from turtles of tropical Wyoming

    Anthropology News -- ScienceDaily
    24 Feb 2015 | 10:12 am
    Tropical turtle fossils discovered in Wyoming reveal that when Earth got warmer, prehistoric turtles headed north. But if today's turtles try the same technique to cope with warming habitats, they might run into trouble.
  • Two observations on the ancestry of Armenians

    Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog
    Dienekes
    28 Feb 2015 | 11:00 pm
    I was thinking a bit on how to interpret the findings of the new Haber et al. preprint, and especially the idea that "29% of the Armenian ancestry may originate from an ancestral population best represented by Neolithic Europeans." I looked at the globe13 proportions, and strangely enough, I had estimated that the three Armenian samples (Armenian_D, Armenians, and Armenians_15_Y) have 28-29% of the Mediterranean component that is modal in Sardinians. This seems like a curious coincidence which has raised my confidence that Haber et al. is picking something real.Looking back at my inferences…
  • Drilling ancient African lakes sheds light on human evolution

    Anthropology News -- ScienceDaily
    26 Feb 2015 | 5:47 am
    How was human evolution and migration influenced by past changes in climate? Researchers hope to find out.
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    anthropology - Yahoo News Search Results

  • College Graduates 3/3/2015

    3 Mar 2015 | 4:45 am
    ALBRIGHT COLLEGE Anthony Rusnak, Carbondale, Bachelor of Science, biology/sociology/anthropology FORDHAM UNIVERSITY Harrison Weinberger, Waverly, bachelor’s degree in psychology LYCOMING COLLEGE Lynette Dooley, New Milford, bachelor’s degree, biology MISE
  • College graduates

    3 Mar 2015 | 1:17 am
    ALBRIGHT COLLEGE Anthony Rusnak, Carbondale, Bachelor of Science, biology/sociology/anthropology FORDHAM UNIVERSITY Harrison Weinberger, Waverly, bachelor’s degree in psychology LYCOMING COLLEGE Lynette Dooley, New Milford, bachelor’s degree, biology MISE
  • Letter: Professors support Real Silent Sam

    2 Mar 2015 | 10:31 pm
    We, the undersigned, are faculty in the Department of Anthropology at UNC-Chapel Hill who would like to voice our strong support for the efforts of the Real Silent Sam Coalition. This growing movement seeks to confront the racist histories of the memorials commemorating white supremacy on campus.
  • ISIS Destruction of Antiques an Opportunity for Education, Say Archaeologists

    27 Feb 2015 | 8:50 am
    Two Cornell University experts in anthropology and archaeology respond to the recent video released by ISIS showing the destruction of unique and important archaeological artifacts in the Mosul Museum.
  • Tribal disconnect worries governor

    23 Feb 2015 | 1:00 am
    Bhubaneswar, Feb. 22: The link between the government and tribals was "slender and the human touch was missing," said governor S.C. Jamir while speaking as the chief guest at the Indian Anthropology Congress here today.
 
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    Savage Minds

  • The Ecology of What We Write

    Carole McGranahan
    2 Mar 2015 | 5:10 am
    [Savage Minds is pleased to publish this essay by Anand Pandian as part of our Writers’ Workshop series. Anand teaches anthropology at Johns Hopkins University. His books include Reel World: An Anthropology of Creation (Duke University Press and Penguin India, forthcoming this fall), and Ayya’s Accounts: A Ledger of Hope in Modern India (Indiana University Press, 2014), which he wrote with his grandfather.] One day last summer, a caterpillar dropped from the rim of my desktop monitor. A peculiar little creature—no more than an inch long, clothed in a jacket of wispy white, a…
  • Savage Minds Welcomes Rebecca Nelson

    Kerim
    27 Feb 2015 | 6:59 pm
    Savage Minds is happy to announce the selection of our new “around the web” intern, Rebecca Nelson! Rebecca Nelson is a Ph.D. candidate in cultural anthropology at the University of Connecticut. Her research focuses on volunteer tourism in Guatemala and how it is opening up new avenues for tourists and hosts to develop more cosmopolitan understandings of the world (as well as opening up new forms of friction over the circulation of knowledge). One of her claims to fame is that her image appeared in the Quetzaltenango paper El Diario, to her surprise, with the caption “Tourists…
  • Anthropology’s Long Tail, or AAA 2.0

    Matt Thompson
    26 Feb 2015 | 6:15 pm
    Does anthropology have a long tail? Maybe it does, but the head really is superior. Isn’t that the idea behind science anyways? The best ideas are the vetted ideas and the rejected ideas are put to rest for a reason. Or maybe its not there at all. But then again… First a refresher is in order. “The Long Tail,” refers to the now classic article (2004!!) by Wired magazine editor, Chris Anderson. It gets its name from a particular kind of curve where one variable functions as the power of another. In Anderson’s classic example such curves are used to describe the…
  • A day for adjuncts

    Ryan
    25 Feb 2015 | 2:46 pm
    In case you didn’t know, today is National Adjunct Walkout Day.  If you need to catch up, here’s a good piece from Democracy Now.  For some more background, check out this recent piece from Inside Higher Ed.  It’s a good day to think about all those adjuncts, lecturers, part-timers and other contingent workers in academia–and what the university is, perhaps, versus what it should be. Most importantly, I think, it’s time for those who are doing relatively well, and in relatively stable positions, to think about the current labor situation in academia, and how…
  • Open Access: it’s about more than just open access (a conversation between two early career anthropologists)

    Ryan
    25 Feb 2015 | 12:02 pm
    The following is based upon a conversation about the implications of Open Access that Jeremy Trombley and I have been having over the course of the past few weeks.  Please do add your own thoughts below.  Jeremy blogs at Struggleforever. Ryan Anderson: So I just finished grad school, and I’m focusing on publishing some articles. I remember a while back you mentioned that you want to commit to publishing all Open Access (OA) articles, and I am right there with you. I think it’s important to push OA forward through our own work. Have you started looking into this? Jeremy Trombley: OA is…
 
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    Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog

  • Oxhide ingots in Scandinavian rock art

    Dienekes
    2 Mar 2015 | 11:00 pm
    Antiquity / Volume 89 / Issue 343 / February 2015, pp 191-209 Representations of oxhide ingots in Scandinavian rock art: the sketchbook of a Bronze Age traveller? Johan Ling and Zofia Stos-Gale Bronze Age trade networks across Europe and the Mediterranean are well documented; Baltic amber and bronze metalwork were particularly valued commodities. Here it is argued that demand for copper and tin led to changes in Scandinavian trade routes around 1600 BC, which can be linked to the appearance of figurative rock art images in southern Scandinavia. Images identified as oxhide ingots have been…
  • mtDNA from Lengyel culture in Poland

    Dienekes
    2 Mar 2015 | 11:00 am
    PLoS ONE 10(2): e0118316. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0118316 Between the Baltic and Danubian Worlds: The Genetic Affinities of a Middle Neolithic Population from Central Poland Wiesław Lorkiewicz et al. For a long time, anthropological and genetic research on the Neolithic revolution in Europe was mainly concentrated on the mechanism of agricultural dispersal over different parts of the continent. Recently, attention has shifted towards population processes that occurred after the arrival of the first farmers, transforming the genetically very distinctive early Neolithic Linear Pottery Culture…
  • Y chromosome mutation rate: 0.82x10-9

    Dienekes
    1 Mar 2015 | 11:00 pm
    This is in Russian, but seems to be using Anzick-1, Ust-Ishim, K14 to get the mutation rate. Fu et al. who just used Ust Ishim got 0.7-0.9 for this which seems very similar, and also identical to the 0.82x10-9 value of Poznik et al. So, for the time being this seems like the value to use, although tighter confidence intervals would be welcome.The Russian Journal of Genetic Genealogy (Русская версия), Vol 6, No 2 (2014)/Vol 7, No 1 (2015) Константа скорости SNP мутаций Y-хромосомы по данным полного…
  • 8,000 year old wheat in Britain

    Dienekes
    1 Mar 2015 | 11:00 am
    Britain received farming later than most of Europe, but perhaps it received one of the products of farming well before any farmers set foot on the island. I've always wondered if news (and at least some products) of the agricultural revolution spread far and wide before the revolution itself did. Did foragers at the northwestern end of Europe hear stories of the strange new people that had already appeared 8,000 years ago on the opposite end of the continent?Was this an isolated incident or will we be finding wheat elsewhere in pre-farming Europe? Science 27 February 2015: Vol. 347 no.
  • Two observations on the ancestry of Armenians

    Dienekes
    28 Feb 2015 | 11:00 pm
    I was thinking a bit on how to interpret the findings of the new Haber et al. preprint, and especially the idea that "29% of the Armenian ancestry may originate from an ancestral population best represented by Neolithic Europeans." I looked at the globe13 proportions, and strangely enough, I had estimated that the three Armenian samples (Armenian_D, Armenians, and Armenians_15_Y) have 28-29% of the Mediterranean component that is modal in Sardinians. This seems like a curious coincidence which has raised my confidence that Haber et al. is picking something real.Looking back at my inferences…
 
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    Material World

  • Aesthetics and ethics: An enquiry into their relationship

    Haidy Geismar
    3 Mar 2015 | 6:44 am
      A one-day workshop ​Wednesday 6 May 2015 9:30 am – 4 pm Venue: Daryll Forde Seminar Room Department of Anthropology University College London 14 Taviton, London WC1H 0BW Keynote speakers: Christopher Pinney (University College London) Roger Sansi-Roca (Goldsmiths) Organizers: Haidy Geismar Elena Magdalena Craciun The relationship between aesthetics and ethics has long been the topic of scholarly debates, from Kant’s (1928[1790]) insistence that the experience of beauty involved disinterested contemplation and, subsequently, the separation of aesthetics from ethics, or…
  • Sawdust and Threads

    Haidy Geismar
    1 Mar 2015 | 2:34 am
    Laurie Ingram, Material And Visual Culture, UCL   Sawdust and Threads is a residency and exhibitions programms that takes de-accessioned museum objects as its material. Artist Caroline Wright has undertaken residencies at three different museum collections and selected objects that have been de-accessioned. For Sawdust and Threads, Caroline has made detailed drawings of each of these objects that are then carefully and painstakingly deconstructed. The drawings as well as the objects from the different collections accompany the artist in the space where the process of deconstruction…
  • Doctoral research fellowships within the strategic research areas of the Museum of Cultural History

    Haidy Geismar
    26 Feb 2015 | 2:40 am
    Two doctoral research fellowships (SKO 1017) within the three strategic research areas of the Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo:  Heritage, Innovation, and Troubled Landscapes The Museum of Cultural History has the largest archaeological and ethnographic collections in Norway, with antiquities dating from prehistoric times to the Reformation, and ethnographic and numismatic antique and contemporary artefacts from all parts of the world. The collections of the museum include the Viking ships, medieval church art, the coin cabinet, an Egyptian collection and an antiquity…
  • CFP: 4S Conference 2015, Panel on technologies of representation

    Jo Aiken
    25 Feb 2015 | 5:03 am
    4S Conference 2015 – Denver, Colorado (USA), 11-14 November 2015 Call for Papers for Open Panel From one thing to another: Technologies of representation in design and making Panel Chairs: Arlene Oak, Department of Human Ecology, University of Alberta (aoak@ualberta.ca) Claire Nicholas, Department of Human Ecology, University of Alberta (cn4@ualberta.ca)   We would like to invite abstract submissions for an open panel at the 4S Conference (Society for the Social Study of Science) in Denver (11-14 November 2015).  The deadline to submit an individual paper abstract to the…
  • CFP: Interface Conference: Materiality and Movement (Carleton University)

    Jo Aiken
    25 Feb 2015 | 4:51 am
    Carleton University’s Interface Conference: Materiality and Movement, 1-3 May 2015 Keynote Speaker: Dr. Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, Harvard University Made objects, unlike bodies that disintegrate – are trans-temporal. They are mobile and are continually moving across time and space, carrying within them stories and meanings that they have accumulated as a result of this mobility. In an increasingly interconnected world – where the meanings of mediatory agents are endlessly shifting, traveling and transforming – there is a growing need for critical inquiry that concerns the entangled…
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    Museum Anthropology

  • Position Announcement: Managing Editor, Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, Denver, Colorado

    1 Mar 2015 | 1:36 pm
    DescriptionThe Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, in collaboration with the Denver Museum of Nature & Science (DMNS), is seeking a full­-time Managing Editor for an exciting new venture to create an online anthropological news portal, aiming to popularize and publicize anthropological research to an international audience. The Managing Editor will be part of an editorial team,
  • MUAN 38.1 "Continued Conversations" Web-Exclusive Content: Jill Minar Interview Part 1

    27 Feb 2015 | 8:45 am
    In Musuem Anthropology 38.1, co-editors Maxine McBrinn and Tony Chavarria conducted interviews with museum anthropologists working within the university setting. This web-exclusive content adds to their collection of interviews published in the journal.  This interview is with Dr. Jill Minar, Instructor of Anthropology/Archaeology in the Anthropology, Economics, and Geography Department,
  • Museum Anthropology 38.1: Web-Exclusive Content

    25 Feb 2015 | 12:16 pm
    In the latest issue of Museum Anthropology (38.1), journal co-editors Tony Chavarria and Maxine McBrinn co-authored an article of interviews with anthropologists that work in university museums.  Over the next few weeks, we will be posting previously unpublished interviews as web-exclusive content.  Keep an eye out for this exciting addition to the blog! 
  • AAM Conference: Indigenous Peoples and Museums Network

    23 Feb 2015 | 8:17 am
    The next annual American Alliance of Museums conference is coming up April 26 to 29. Here are the events in which the Indigenous Peoples and Museums Network (IPMN) will be hosting or involved with: 1) IPMN Annual Meeting will be a breakfast this year:  Marriott Marquis Hotel  Tuesday   7:15-8:15 a.m.   Join us for this breakfast and networking forum for those interested in strengthening the
  • Museum Anthropology Teaching Resources: Northern Arizona University

    17 Feb 2015 | 6:06 pm
    If you have a syllabus or course resources you'd like to share with our community, please email mua4web@gmail.com and we will post it at a later date.  ------------------- MST 360: Topics Course in Museum Studies (co-convened with MST 599): Native American Representation in Museums Northern Arizona University T/Th: 4:00-5:15PM Liberal Arts Rm 209F Spring 2015 Instructor: Gwen Saul, PhD
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    Somatosphere

  • Book Forum––Warwick Anderson and Ian R. Mackay’s “Intolerant Bodies” by Todd Meyers

    Todd Meyers
    2 Mar 2015 | 9:40 am
    We are happy to present a book forum organized around the release of  Warwick Anderson and Ian R. Mackay‘s Intolerant Bodies: A Short History of Autoimmunity (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014).  Here, a “short” history should not be mistaken for one that is “thin” – Anderson and Mackay masterfully navigate a terrain populated as much by bodies as ideas.  The writing is rich and detailed, a mix of intellectual genealogy and historical chronicle – the book is sure to serve as a resource for medical anthropologists, historians, and science studies scholars alike for…
  • In the Journals — January, Part 2, and February 2015 by Aaron Seaman

    Aaron Seaman
    28 Feb 2015 | 11:19 am
    This month’s post is extra large, as it gathers the tail end of last month as well. Also, if you haven’t already, check out the special issues listed at the end of this post. Enjoy! January 2015, Part 2  (You can find Part 1 here) Medical Anthropology Anthropologies In and Of Evidence Making In Global Health Research and Policy (Invited Editorial) Christopher J. Colvin Anthropologists are not generally known for being optimistic about the state and status of their discipline’s contribution to health research, policy, and practice. Contemporary debates around the forms and…
  • Web Roundup: Transportation Technologies and Futures by Lily Shapiro

    Lily Shapiro
    28 Feb 2015 | 9:35 am
    This month’s Web Roundup is about transportation—technologies, politics, and histories. Much of it has to do with driverless/autonomous cars, which have been in the news a lot this month. Time has a piece on the technical details of how driverless cars work, and what hurdles need to be overcome before they do. The Atlantic’s CityLab has an interesting article on the project of “humanizing driverless cars,” which aims to address the fact that autonomous cars may have the technical ability to drive in such a way that makes human passengers uncomfortable. For instance, they did a test…
  • Bio-Ethnography: A Collaborative, Methodological Experiment in Mexico City by Elizabeth F.S. Roberts

    Elizabeth F.S. Roberts
    26 Feb 2015 | 10:03 am
    In 1993, a team of U.S.-based environmental health researchers partnered with public health officials in Mexico to form ELEMENT (Early Life Exposure in Mexico to Environmental Toxicants). The project aimed to study the effects of chemical exposures, particularly lead, on fetal and childhood growth and neurological development in what the United Nation then designated as the most polluted city on earth. Since then, ELEMENT project staff have collected samples of blood, urine, hair, toenails, breast milk, and teeth for ongoing molecular analysis from nearly 2000 participants, mostly…
  • Michal Shapira’s The War Inside by Andrew Lea

    Andrew Lea
    20 Feb 2015 | 12:30 am
    The War Inside: Psychoanalysis, Total War, and the Making of the Democratic Self in Postwar Britain by Michal Shapira 2013, Cambridge University Press, 284 pages   Between September 1940 and May 1941, the Luftwaffe dropped nearly 50,000 tons of bombs over Britain. In 1940, at the height of these air raids during World War II, the celebrated British poet Edith Sitwell wrote “Still Falls the Rain.” The poem, among Sitwell’s most widely recognized, carries the sorrow of the historical moment from which it emerged: Still falls the Rain - Dark as the world of man, black as our loss -…
 
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    Visual Anthropology of Japan - 日本映像人類学

  • "NTT creates two-dimensional pictures that can move"

    22 Feb 2015 | 8:56 pm
    From Japan Today, 2/23/15: Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corp (NTT) recently announced that they’ve developed a way to make normal, printed-out two-dimensional pictures look like they’re moving through a bit of magic of their own. The way NTT accomplishes this is by using a projector to shine a moving light onto a picture. NTT calls the process “Hengento” (Deformation Lamps): a lamp (the projector) is deforming (magic-ifying) a picture. All NTT has done is trick our brains with an optical illusion. Whenever we watch a movie or TV, our brain puts together the “color,” “form,”…
  • Interesting new content at Japan Focus: "On Imaging Disaster: Tokyo and the Visual Culture of Japan’s Great Earthquake of 1923" by Gennifer Weisenfeld

    17 Feb 2015 | 1:12 am
    Image and text borrowed from Japan Focus (see full citation below). Caption reads: Taishō 12.9.1 Actual Conditions of the Great Tokyo Earthquake: Twelve Stories. Disaster is an ever-present, and ever-timely, issue both in Japan and around the world. The triple disaster of 3.11 and its extensive media coverage are a vivid reminder not only of disaster’s critical and catalytic role in history, but the dynamic agency of images in mediating our experiences of natural or man-made events to produce that history. The 1923 Great Kantō Earthquake, which devastated the major cities of Tokyo…
  • "Forget your paints and pencils! Emojis are the best new art medium"

    8 Feb 2015 | 6:10 pm
    Image and text borrowed from Japan Today, 2/9/15....thanks to a new site, anyone can freely combine emoji for a hundred times more expressiveness. That’s exactly what Kazuki Takakura, art director for a Tokyo theatre company, did – and the results are nothing short of spectacular! ...the website presents users with every emoji available... After selecting an emoji, the user is presented with a blank canvas, upon which your chosen emoji can be placed. Clicking and dragging will paste a string of the images, like a paint brush. You can quickly select other emoji by pressing any key on the…
  • So Wrong: "Oregon judge: taking photos up girl's skirt not illegal"

    8 Feb 2015 | 1:14 am
    From Reuters via MSN.com, 2/7/15: An Oregon judge has acquitted a 61-year-old man who admitted taking photographs up the skirt of a 13-year-old girl as she shopped at a Target store in suburban Portland, lawyers in the case said Friday. Washington County Circuit Court Judge Eric Butterfield ruled on Thursday that Patrick Buono did not break the law when he surreptitiously took the pictures of the girl in January 2013, said his defense attorney Mark Lawrence. "He did not deny it and he feels real bad about it too, by the way," Lawrence said. The girl did not notice his actions, Lawrence said,…
  • "Princess Kako attends ‘kyogen’ play performed in sign language in Tokyo"

    3 Feb 2015 | 6:58 pm
    Photo and text borrowed from The Asahi News, 2/2/15.Princess Kiko and her daughter Princess Kako attended traditional “kyogen” comedic plays performed in sign language by actors with hearing impairments at the National Noh Theater in Tokyo’s Shibuya Ward on Feb. 1. Kako is the second daughter of Prince Fumihito, the second in line to the Chrysanthemum Throne. She is studying sign language, which her mother has studied and is well versed in. The Japanese Theater of the Deaf performed such plays as “Jishaku” (magnet). The event in Japanese is roughly translated as “kyogen performed…
 
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    Glossographia

  • Why adjunct labor matters to all of us

    schrisomalis
    25 Feb 2015 | 6:12 am
    Today is National Adjunct Walkout Day, and if National Anthropology Day (from my last post) is not going to become a statutory holiday, you can be doubly sure that this one won’t either.   It has come about in order to raise awareness of and provoke action against a serious problem: the working conditions of adjunct faculty in academia.  Along with organizations like the New Faculty Majority, the aim of NAWD is to highlight the low pay, lack of benefits, and insecure employment of most of the people who teach college students today. I, along with a significant but declining number of…
  • How and why (not) to go to grad school (Happy National Anthropology Day!)

    schrisomalis
    19 Feb 2015 | 6:15 am
    Today, Feb. 19, is National Anthropology Day.  Now, you may not have previously heard of this hallowed waypoint in the seasonal cycle, and the likelihood that you’ll see Hallmark picking up on this is close to zero, but nevertheless, here it is. In honor of this most glorious occasion, I will be presenting a talk I’ve given many times before, in various forms, entitled ‘How and why (not) to go to grad school’, in this case, at a seminar sponsored by the Wayne State Anthropology Learning Community.  (By the way, in case you were wondering, learning communities, when…
  • Language, Culture, and History: a reading list

    schrisomalis
    15 Feb 2015 | 8:42 am
    Having appropriately propitiated the curricular deities, it appears that this coming fall, I’m going to be teaching a graduate seminar in linguistic anthropology on the topic of Language, Culture, and History.   The readings will be drawn from linguistically-oriented historical anthropology and ethnohistory, anthropologically-oriented historical sociolinguistics, and linguistically-oriented archaeology, if that makes any sense.  Maybe not? Anyway, last night I put together my ‘long list’ of 40-odd books that we might potentially read. Some of these will come off the list…
  • Still embuggered up

    schrisomalis
    2 Feb 2015 | 6:29 pm
    Over five years ago, I published what was (for a long time) to be my most popular post here at Glossographia, A feisty embuggerance, in which I described in the wild a particularly bizarre sort of optical character recognition error that found its way into Google Scholar’s metadata, resulting in an otherwise ordinary paper authored by the unlikely duo of Escalate Embuggerance and Holistic Feisty (Embuggerance and Feisty 1985).  After the folks at Language Log talked about it, I thought for sure that it would be scant weeks before the error was corrected.   Alas, here we are, in 2015,…
  • Ph.Dining: the art of social eating in grad school

    schrisomalis
    19 Jan 2015 | 10:20 am
    It’s probably not a secret to anyone who has ever been in grad school (or who reads PHD Comics) that departmental and college social events can be an important way to stave off starvation. My own graduate studies in anthropology at McGill were characterized, in my dim recollection, by half-full plates of cheese and bread stuffed not-so-surreptitiously into backpacks and carted away by those fortunate souls whose hard-earned anthropological knowledge of generalized reciprocity or optimal foraging theory translated into practice. Oh, right, and the wine. So much department wine. Less of…
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    media/anthropology

  • Workshop note: Digital media and socio-political change

    John Postill
    3 Mar 2015 | 6:26 am
    By Victor Lasa On 20 February 2015, Dr John Postill convened a workshop with fellow RMIT scholars and research students around the topic of “Digital media and socio-political change”. Participants came from a range of disciplinary and professional backgrounds, including anthropology, journalism, economics, and cultural studies (see their profiles here). The aim of the workshop was to get to know each other’s work and research interests and explore potential collaborations. One of the threads emerging from the discussions was the idea that the internet has been considered a space for…
  • E-seminar on the Energy and Digital Living website by Sarah Pink et al

    John Postill
    25 Feb 2015 | 10:25 pm
    This is the opening post of the EASA Media Anthropology Network’s 50th e-seminar, convened by Veronica Barassi (Goldsmiths). The session is currently under way. E-seminars are free and open to anyone with a genuine interest in the anthropology of media. To participate please subscribe to our mailing list via this page. Dear All, Welcome to the 50th EASA Media Anthropology Network e-seminar! For those of you who are new to this mailing list, these sessions run for two weeks on the list and all subscribers are welcome to participate. For this special occasion we will not be…
  • Digital ethnography: ‘being there’ physically, remotely, virtually and imaginatively

    John Postill
    25 Feb 2015 | 9:59 am
    A revised version of this post will appear in Pink, S., H. Horst, J. Postill, L. Hjorth, T. Lewis and J. Tacchi. 2015, Forthcoming. Digital Ethnography: Principles and Practices. London: Sage. IN 2003 AND 2004 I conducted anthropological fieldwork in the Kuala Lumpur suburb of Subang Jaya, Malaysia (Postill 2011). I was part of an international team of social anthropologists from the universities of Bremen, Manchester and Amsterdam studying e-governance initiatives in multi-ethnic areas of six different countries. The aim of this comparative project was to determine whether the internet was…
  • 13. Six ways of doing digital ethnography

    John Postill
    16 Jan 2015 | 8:25 am
    This is the thirteenth instalment in the freedom technologists series. A revised version will appear in Pink, S., H. Horst, J. Postill, L. Hjorth, T. Lewis and J. Tacchi. 2015, Forthcoming. Digital Ethnography: Principles and Practices. London: Sage. IN THE 2000s I studied an internet-mediated social world that remained fairly stable throughout the main period of fieldwork, namely the field of residential politics in a middle-class suburb of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (Postill 2011). However, digital ethnographers will sometimes find that the social worlds they are researching will experience…
  • 12. Freedom technologists and protest formulas in Egypt

    John Postill
    20 Dec 2014 | 12:25 am
    John Postill:This is the twelfth instalment in the freedom technologists series. Originally posted on CONNECTED in CAIRO: What can formulaic expression tell us about media and social change? For one thing, to study technology users rather than technologies, says John Postill in a recent article. There’s a new article out from John Postill in the latest issue of Convergence that may be relevant to the study of the roles digital media played (and continue to play) in the Egyptian revolution. John’s project is to study the relationship between Internet activism and post-2008 protest…
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    American Journal of Physical Anthropology

  • Childhood trauma: Methods for the identification of physeal fractures in nonadult skeletal remains

    Petra Verlinden, Mary E. Lewis
    1 Mar 2015 | 8:32 pm
    ABSTRACT Objectives: Today, fractures at the growth plate (or physis) are common injuries in children, but provide challenges of identification in skeletonized remains. Clinical studies provide detailed information on the mechanisms, locations, age of occurrence, and complications associated with physeal fractures, enabling the development of new criteria for identifying this injury in nonadults. To test these criteria, skeletal remains from five rural and urban medieval cemeteries were examined. Methods: The sample consisted of 961 skeletons (0–17 years) with open epiphyses. Macroscopic…
  • Virtual taphonomy: A new method integrating excavation and postprocessing in an archaeological context

    Helene Wilhelmson, Nicoló Dell'Unto
    26 Feb 2015 | 8:53 pm
    ABSTRACT The objective of this paper was to integrate excavation and post-processing of archaeological and osteological contexts and material to enhance the interpretation of these with specific focus on the taphonomical aspects. A method was designed, Virtual Taphonomy, based on the use and integration of image-based 3D modeling techniques into a 3D GIS platform, and tested on a case study. Merging the 3D models and a database directly in the same virtual environment allowed the authors to fully integrate excavation and post-processing in a complex spatial analysis reconnecting contexts…
  • Accentuated lines in the enamel of primary incisors from skeletal remains: A contribution to the explanation of early childhood mortality in a medieval population from Poland

    Elżbieta Żądzińska, Wiesław Lorkiewicz, Marta Kurek, Beata Borowska-Strugińska
    24 Feb 2015 | 8:39 pm
    Abstract Physiological disruptions resulting from an impoverished environment during the first years of life are of key importance for the health and biological status of individuals and populations. Studies of growth processes in archaeological populations point to the fact that the main causes of childhood mortality in the past are to be sought among extrinsic factors. Based on this assumption, one would expect random mortality of children, with the deceased individuals representing the entire subadult population. The purpose of this study is to explore whether differences in early…
  • Skeletal evidence of tuberculosis in a modern identified human skeletal collection (Certosa cemetery, Bologna, Italy)

    Valentina Mariotti, Micol Zuppello, Maria Elena Pedrosi, Matteo Bettuzzi, Rosa Brancaccio, Eva Peccenini, Maria Pia Morigi, Maria Giovanna Belcastro
    24 Feb 2015 | 8:36 pm
    ABSTRACT The diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) in osteoarcheological series relies on the identification of osseous lesions caused by the disease. The study of identified skeletal collections provides the opportunity to investigate the distribution of skeletal lesions in relation to this disease. The aim of this study was to examine the skeletal evidence for TB in late adolescent and adult individuals from the identified human collection of the Certosa cemetery of Bologna (Italy, 19th–20th c.). The sample group consists of 244 individuals (138 males, 106 females) ranging from 17 to 88 years of…
  • Brief communication: Comparing apples and oranges—the influence of food mechanical properties on ingestive bite sizes in lemurs

    Adam Hartstone-Rose, Jennifer A. Parkinson, Taylor Criste, Jonathan M.G. Perry
    24 Feb 2015 | 8:35 pm
    ABSTRACT Previously we found that Maximum Ingested Bite Size (Vb)—the largest piece of food that an animal will ingest whole without biting first—scales isometrically with body size in 17 species of strepsirrhines at the Duke Lemur Center (DLC). However, because this earlier study focused on only three food types (two with similar mechanical properties), it did not yield results that were easily applied to describing the broad diets of these taxa. Expressing Vb in terms of food mechanical properties allows us to compare data across food types, including foods of wild lemurs, to better…
 
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