Anthropology

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  • New documentary tells story of orangutan who learned sign language at UTC

    anthropology - Yahoo News Search Results
    22 Jul 2014 | 9:26 pm
    University of Tennessee at Chattanooga anthropology professor Lyn Miles thought she'd contribute to science in the late 1970s by being the first researcher to teach sign language to an orangutan.
  • Blame and responsibility: An unfolding ethnographic drama [Part one]

    Savage Minds
    Bree Blakeman
    21 Jul 2014 | 10:50 pm
    [Savage Minds welcomes guest blogger Bree Blakeman. Bree recently submitted her Ph.D. through The Australian National University in Canberra, though you may know her from her more usual online incarnation, as author of the blog Fieldnotes and Footnotes. This is the first in a series of posts looking at the way Yolŋu consider issues of blame and responsibility.] I have been thinking a lot about comparative concepts of responsibility lately, particularly in light of recent publications on morality and ethics. Given this, and the fact my political and theoretical views get airing-enough…
  • Finding The Anthropology In Latin Dance Music

    anthropology - Yahoo News Search Results
    23 Jul 2014 | 1:41 pm
    The Uruguayan singer-songwriter Jorge Drexler, a former doctor, is known as a literate and introspective musician. But then he wondered how his brainy musings would translate to music for the body.
  • Why Do Young Earth Creationists Only Know Of Lucy?

    Anthropology.net
    Kambiz Kamrani
    2 Jul 2014 | 1:42 pm
    Adam Benton from EvoAnth has published an interesting paper where he tries to understand why Young Earth Creationists are consistently ignorant of other fossil hominids. To help answer his question, he analyzed how three prominent creationist websites are represent the hominin fossil record. Benton searched for mentions of five other hominid species that are just as important as Lucy and ideally should be represented just as in-depth. The results of his study are shown in the table below. It shows how many times these websites refer each of the fossils under consideration. You can clearly…
  • Dog jealousy: Study suggests primordial origins for the 'green-eyed monster'

    Anthropology News -- ScienceDaily
    23 Jul 2014 | 11:17 am
    Dogs exhibit jealous behaviors. The first experimental test of jealousy in dogs supports the view that there may be a more basic form of jealousy, which evolved to protect social bonds from interlopers.
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    anthropology - Yahoo News Search Results

  • Finding The Anthropology In Latin Dance Music

    23 Jul 2014 | 1:41 pm
    The Uruguayan singer-songwriter Jorge Drexler, a former doctor, is known as a literate and introspective musician. But then he wondered how his brainy musings would translate to music for the body.
  • New documentary tells story of orangutan who learned sign language at UTC

    22 Jul 2014 | 9:26 pm
    University of Tennessee at Chattanooga anthropology professor Lyn Miles thought she'd contribute to science in the late 1970s by being the first researcher to teach sign language to an orangutan.
  • Anthropologists gather for “Reflecting on Disasters” forum in DC

    20 Jul 2014 | 5:44 pm
    DAVAO CITY (MindaNews / 20 July) — In celebration of Philippine Anthropology Day, anthropologists and anthropology students as well as representatives from other disciplines, will gather at the Ateneo de… »
  • Sexual Harassment, Assault Are Common On Scientific Field Studies

    18 Jul 2014 | 10:18 am
    University of Illinois A survey of 142 men and 516 women with experience in field studies in anthropology, archaeology, geology and other scientific disciplines reveals that many of them – particularly the younger ones – suffered or witnessed sexual harassment or sexual assault while at work in the field. A majority of the survey respondents (64 percent) said they had experienced sexual ...
  • FINALLY! An Ivy League Anthropology Professor Says Something Intelligent

    18 Jul 2014 | 6:32 am
    Brown University anthropology professor Dwight Heath has broken with the decades of obscure scholarly work produced in his academic field by declaring very practically that states across America should lower the legal drinking age. The Ivy League professor believes the drinking age should be 18 across the fruited plain — if not lower. Naturally, when the NBC affiliate turned to a spokeswoman for ...
 
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    Anthropology.net

  • Why Do Young Earth Creationists Only Know Of Lucy?

    Kambiz Kamrani
    2 Jul 2014 | 1:42 pm
    Adam Benton from EvoAnth has published an interesting paper where he tries to understand why Young Earth Creationists are consistently ignorant of other fossil hominids. To help answer his question, he analyzed how three prominent creationist websites are represent the hominin fossil record. Benton searched for mentions of five other hominid species that are just as important as Lucy and ideally should be represented just as in-depth. The results of his study are shown in the table below. It shows how many times these websites refer each of the fossils under consideration. You can clearly…
  • Integrating Health

    nataliamagnani
    19 Mar 2014 | 12:46 pm
    When dealing with the term “medicine,” there is no single definition, static through space and time.  Many of the world’s medical systems illustrate diverging, sometimes opposing, stories of health and healing, and each culture invariably believes in its own medicine. Unfortunately, our globalized world has been slow to recognize the medicine of the “other.”  Last month the Prince of Wales was dismayed by delay tactics of the government in creating a register of healthcare practitioners that would include alternative, complementary, and holistic professionals alongside their…
  • Dr. Yonatan Sahle and the African Origins of Human Intelligence

    Kambiz Kamrani
    2 Mar 2014 | 7:13 am
    Dr. Yonatan Sahle now holds the Glenn Isaac Postdoctoral Seat in the Human Evolution Research Center at UC Berkeley. He recently gave a talk at my alma mater on the African Origins of Human Intelligence at CSU East Bay. You all may know that our early ancestors diverged from sub-Saharan populations approx 100,000 – 250,000 years ago. Our technology during this transition was prolific. Dr. Sahle discusses this, along with what he has recently found, the earliest projectile points in the world. His entire talk is listed above…. Take time to check out this excerpt from the Q&A…
  • Oldest Hominin Footprints Found Outside of Africa

    mmagnan1
    7 Feb 2014 | 9:56 pm
    The Laetoli hominin footprints have finally met their match. A group of footprints dating between 850,000 and 950,000 years ago were reported in coastal Happisburgh, the United Kingdom, as seen in a publication in Plos One today. The work was headed by Nick Ashton of the British Museum. Laetoli Footprints, Tanzania. Photo by Tim Evanson Footprints are rarely preserved prehistorically—their survival generaly requires just the right level of moisture and sediment composition, followed by a low-energy depositional context to gently cover the impression. In fact, before this the oldest known…
  • Bill Nye takes on Young Earth Creationism

    mmagnan1
    5 Feb 2014 | 11:35 am
    Yesterday, young earth creationist Ken Ham hosted household name Bill Nye at the Creation Museum to “debate” evolution. See the recording here. I first heard about the Nye Ham event a few weeks ago, and was at first perturbed with Nye that he would enter into such an exchange.  I side more with Richard Dawkins (on this one), that entering into any kind of discussion with creationists lends some sort of validity to their perspective, which can usually be cured with a heavy dose of education. Last night I tuned in for about an hour of the talk, and heard two men speaking past one…
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    Savage Minds

  • Blame and responsibility: An unfolding ethnographic drama [Part one]

    Bree Blakeman
    21 Jul 2014 | 10:50 pm
    [Savage Minds welcomes guest blogger Bree Blakeman. Bree recently submitted her Ph.D. through The Australian National University in Canberra, though you may know her from her more usual online incarnation, as author of the blog Fieldnotes and Footnotes. This is the first in a series of posts looking at the way Yolŋu consider issues of blame and responsibility.] I have been thinking a lot about comparative concepts of responsibility lately, particularly in light of recent publications on morality and ethics. Given this, and the fact my political and theoretical views get airing-enough…
  • Around the Web Digest: Week of July 13

    Dick Powis
    20 Jul 2014 | 7:39 pm
    Hello folks. May I present to you the weekly review of the internet’s best (or most interesting) articles and materials for your consumption. If you have something that you want to share for next week, hit me with an email (richard.powis@gmail.com) or on Twitter at @dtpowis. Check ‘em out after the jump. By anthropologists: First and foremost, the big story is the Survey of Academic Field Experiences (also known as #SAFE13), an article published this week on PLOS by authors Kate Clancy, Robin Nelson, Julienne Rutherford, and Katie Hinde. The study finds that a shocking 64 percent…
  • The Graduate Advisor Handbook: Take Its Advice

    Rex
    16 Jul 2014 | 5:15 pm
    Shore, Bruce M. 2014. The Graduate Advisor Handbook : A Student-centered Approach. Chicago: University of Chicago Press I’m a big fan of the University of Chicago Press’s series on academic life (disclosure: this may be because I went there for graduate school). Their series on writing, editing, and publishing  features several of my favorite titles, and their younger series on ‘the academic life’ has also gotten off to a good start. So I was optimistic about Bruce Shore’s The Graduate Advisor Handbook: A Student-Centered Approach. Having read it Shore’s…
  • Anthropologists Respond to Frequently Asked Questions About a AAA BDS Resolution

    Isaiah Silver
    15 Jul 2014 | 8:41 pm
    We would like to thank the editors of Savage Minds for inviting us to kick off this important conversation on a potential AAA resolution in support of BDS. Over the past four posts, we have tried to highlight some of the key reasons for why anthropologists in particular should honor the call to boycott that was originally issued by a united Palestinian civil society in 2005. From our analysis of the role archeology plays in the dispossession of Palestinians to our overview of historical boycotts within the AAA and discussion of academic freedom, we made the case that BDS is the only sensible,…
  • Minority Report

    Matt Thompson
    14 Jul 2014 | 9:12 pm
    Last week I sent out a job app, well, internship app to be truthful. After all I’m a grad student again. But its significant to me because it was the first one I have applied to in the field of archives. I am just now wrapping up an internship at a museum library and being that this is the first time I’ve written a cover letter for an archives position I sought out one of the senior archivists for advice. We talked about what sort of language to use, making sure I could describe the work I had already accomplished with the proper jargon. Then he said, “And you should say…
 
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    Anthropology News -- ScienceDaily

  • Dog jealousy: Study suggests primordial origins for the 'green-eyed monster'

    23 Jul 2014 | 11:17 am
    Dogs exhibit jealous behaviors. The first experimental test of jealousy in dogs supports the view that there may be a more basic form of jealousy, which evolved to protect social bonds from interlopers.
  • Ancient genetic material from caries bacterium obtained for the first time

    23 Jul 2014 | 8:04 am
    Streptococcus mutans, one of the principal bacteria that cause dental caries, has increased the change in its genetic material over time, possibly coinciding with dietary change linked to the expansion of humanity.
  • Little too late: Pathogenic bacterium in 700-year-old skeleton identified

    15 Jul 2014 | 5:51 am
    Researchers have recovered a genome of the bacterium Brucella melitensis from a 700-year-old skeleton found in the ruins of a Medieval Italian village. Researchers used a technique called shotgun metagenomics to sequence DNA from a calcified nodule from the pelvic region of a middle-aged male skeleton excavated from the settlement of Geridu in Sardinia, an island off the coast of Italy. Geridu is thought to have been abandoned in the late 14th century.
  • Ötzi's non-human DNA: Opportunistic pathogen discovered in Iceman tissue biopsy

    15 Jul 2014 | 5:50 am
    Ötzi’s human genome was decoded from a hip bone sample taken from the 5,300 year old mummy. However the tiny sample weighing no more than 0.1 g provides so much more information. A team of scientists analyzed the non-human DNA in the sample. They found evidence for the presence of Treponema denticola, an opportunistic pathogen involved in the development of periodontal disease.
  • Biologists link sexual selection, placenta formation

    9 Jul 2014 | 11:04 am
    Sexual selection enhances opportunities to mate, the tail of male peacocks being an iconic example. Biologists have found that sexual selection and 'placentation' -- the formation of a placenta -- are linked. Describing the life histories of more than 150 species of fish in the family Poeciliidae, the researchers found that species with placentas tend to have males that do not have bright coloration, ornamentation or courtship displays.
 
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    Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog

  • More selection on the X than in autosomes in humans

    Dienekes
    17 Jul 2014 | 6:46 am
    Mol Biol Evol (2014) doi: 10.1093/molbev/msu166 Evidence for Increased Levels of Positive and Negative Selection on the X Chromosome versus Autosomes in Humans Krishna R. Veeramah et al. Partially recessive variants under positive selection are expected to go to fixation more quickly on the X chromosome as a result of hemizygosity, an effect known as faster-X. Conversely, purifying selection is expected to reduce substitution rates more effectively on the X chromosome. Previous work in humans contrasted divergence on the autosomes and X chromosome, with results tending to support the faster-X…
  • Craniofacial feminization and the origin of behavioral modernity

    Dienekes
    17 Jul 2014 | 5:14 am
    Current Anthropology Vol. 55, No. 4, August 2014Robert L. Cieri et al.Abstract: The past 200,000 years of human cultural evolution have witnessed the persistent establishment of behaviors involving innovation, planning depth, and abstract and symbolic thought, or what has been called “behavioral modernity.” Demographic models based on increased human population density from the late Pleistocene onward have been increasingly invoked to understand the emergence of behavioral modernity. However, high levels of social tolerance, as seen among living humans, are a necessary prerequisite…
  • Early Neandertal disappearance in Iberia

    Dienekes
    17 Jul 2014 | 5:08 am
    Journal of Human Evolution DOI: 10.1016/j.jhevol.2014.06.002 New evidence of early Neanderthal disappearance in the Iberian Peninsula Bertila Galván et al. The timing of the end of the Middle Palaeolithic and the disappearance of Neanderthals continue to be strongly debated. Current chronometric evidence from different European sites pushes the end of the Middle Palaeolithic throughout the continent back to around 42 thousand years ago (ka). This has called into question some of the dates from the Iberian Peninsula, previously considered as one of the last refuge zones of the Neanderthals.
  • k-means and structure

    Dienekes
    14 Jul 2014 | 11:00 pm
    I was reading one of the many negative reviews of Nicholas Wade's new book when I came across this statement:"The problem is that Structure, which uses an algorithm called “k-means,”"I pointed out that Structure does not use k-means and a small discussion ensued on twitter. I see that the above statement has now been removed from the article, but an endnote on the topic remains:*Originally, I wrote that STRUCTURE uses the k-means algorithm. Some population geneticists thought that I oversimplified what STRUCTURE does. Different clustering algorithms make different assumptions.
  • Armed conflict in the Sahara, ~13 thousand years ago

    Dienekes
    14 Jul 2014 | 1:52 pm
    An interesting story from the Independent: Scientists are investigating what may be the oldest identified race war 13,000 years after it raged on the fringes of the Sahara. French scientists working in collaboration with the British Museum have been examining dozens of skeletons, a majority of whom appear to have been killed by archers using flint-tipped arrows. ... Parallel research over recent years has also been shedding new light as to who, in ethnic and racial terms, these victims were. Work carried out at Liverpool John Moores University, the University of Alaska and New Orleans’…
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    Material World

  • Best of Material World Blog: Landscape and Place

    Patrick LAVIOLETTE
    23 Jul 2014 | 11:34 am
    Patrick Laviolette (EHI, Tallinn University, hosts of EASA2014) In terms of providing reflections on the material dimensions of place and landscape, here are some links to what I feel have been amongst the more provocative postings on the blog over the years. Many of the authors to the links below implicitly, or sometimes even explicitly ask: how do we depict our spatial experiences through the digital medium of blogging? In Feb 2007, Graeme Were put up a piece simply entitled ‘Footpaths‘ byKate Cameron-Daum. It is an eye-catching post which stirred my own curiosity on methods of…
  • Made in Palestine

    Haidy Geismar
    17 Jul 2014 | 4:16 am
    Christopher Pinney, UCL [Please note: this  post was written before the intensification of the current Israeli offensive on Gaza] I decided to transgress the BDS (Boycott, Disinvestment and Sanctions) injunction and attend a conference on ‘The Photographic Imagination’ in Tel Aviv in June 2014 for several reasons.  The two central ones concerned, firstly, the Apartheid analogy. Having taught a short course at the University of Cape Town in 2000 it was quite apparent that there were many courageous dissident academic intellectuals that had been a key element of the resistance during the…
  • Best of Material World Blog: Museums, Exhibitions, Archives, Memorials

    Aaron Glass
    14 Jul 2014 | 6:05 pm
    – Compiled by Aaron Glass (Bard Graduate Center)  Since its inception, Material World has treated museums and archives not only as repositories of material culture, but as material culture–that is, material products as well as producers of culture and social memory. As institutions, they are sites of collection and exhibition, acts that have their own material and materializing dimensions. Here are some of our favorite posts about museums, exhibitions, archives, and memorials: Graeme Were reviews the Musée du Quai Branly a year after it opened. Anna Weinrich examines two…
  • “We left when the bullets were falling like rain:” Syrian refugees’ illustrated stories

    Aaron Glass
    10 Jul 2014 | 1:34 pm
    Earlier this year, artist George Butler spent several days in the refugees’ ‘tented settlements’ of northern Lebanon. His portraits of the people – and the often random possessions they brought with them when they fled their homes – tell their own poignant tales. Picture captions by Nick Rice. Read the full story and see more images in The Guardian… Continue Reading
  • Mundane Objects: Materiality and non-Verbal Communication by Pierre Lemonnier

    Haidy Geismar
    8 Jul 2014 | 4:41 am
    Haidy Geismar, UCL The latest issue of Hau has a symposium on Pierre Lemmonier’s latest book, Mundane Objects, with commentary by Bruno Latour, Chris Ballard, Tim Ingold, Paul Graves-Brown, Susanne Küchler and a response by Pierre Lemmonier. The series of comments essentially sum up a “state of the art” comment on material culture theory, which Tim Ingold pithily sums up to date: Perhaps there is something to be said for going back to the anthropological debates of the 1960s and 1970s on such themes as symbolic condensation, the distinction (or lack of it) between ritual…
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    Museum Anthropology

  • Peru Seeks Repatriation of 400 Cultural Artifacts from New York

    21 Jul 2014 | 1:12 pm
    Rachel Chase, Peru This Week Julu 16, 2014 New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art currently houses hundreds of artifacts from the Mochica culture— and Peru wants them back. Peruvian cultural artifacts are making their way home from all over the world— Sweden’s return of the Paracas textiles being a particularly high-profile incidence of repatriation. Now, the regional government of Piura is
  • 16th National Tribal Preservation Conference

    16 Jul 2014 | 9:11 am
    16th National Tribal Preservation Conference "You are invited to participate in the conference, which is open to all interested participants whether or not you are a THPO or NATHPO member.  We encourage all individuals who are interested in learning more about tribal cultural preservation and sharing your knowledge and experiences." Helpful links for conference logistics: Indian Summer
  • Controversial Sale of Museum's 4,500-year-old Egyptian Statue Set to Raise Millions at Auction

    10 Jul 2014 | 2:15 pm
    Culture 24 July 2, 2014The controversial sale of a 4,500-year-old Egyptian statue, set to proceed at a Christie’s auction next week which could raise up to £6 million, will put Northampton Museum and Art Gallery’s future loans and fundraising prospects in jeopardy, the Museums Association has warned.Under the terms of the Arts Council’s Accreditation status, which allows the museum to exchange
  • Sacred Hopi Tribal Masks are Again Sold at Auction in Paris

    7 Jul 2014 | 12:14 pm
    Mike Boehm, The Los Angeles Times June 28, 2014 Another group of sacred Hopi masks was gaveled away at a Paris auction Friday, over the objections of tribe members and the U.S. Embassy in Paris, Agence France Presse has reported.In Hopi tradition, the masks don’t merely represent spirits, but embody them, making it a sacrilege to collect and display them, or otherwise use them outside the
  • Museum of Fine Arts Returns Eight Artifacts to Nigeria

    4 Jul 2014 | 10:52 am
    Geoff Edgers, the Boston Globe June 22, 2014  Eight Nigerian artifacts that were probably stolen decades ago and illegally sent to the United States have been returned to the West African country by the Museum of Fine Arts, according to museum officials, who said Nigerian authorities planned to announce the transfer on Thursday. The decision to return the artworks, including a
 
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    Kimberly Christian's Garcinia Cambogia

  • Weight Management Easier with Forskolin

    admin
    3 Jul 2014 | 8:36 am
    As I have said many times, strength training that has a healthy diet will be the secret combination to lose weight and keeping rid of it. That doesn’t take anything away from using every scientific fact to aid in your quest. Even simple things can support how much weight you lose and just how fast you lose it. Consult with a dietician anyone want to learn the most about bodyweight. They will teach you how generate smart, a good diet choices that you can try to find your day by day life. You know that maintaining a healthy diet is the cornerstone of ready to lose weight. Coleus could be…
  • Weight Loss With Green Coffee Beans

    admin
    15 Jun 2014 | 7:05 pm
    There are generally kinds people today who and companies selling pills, exercise systems, and gimmicks to help people shed extra. They all have different opinions about what “the” biggest reason for women who live trouble pounds is. And if you listen long enough they will all an individual what assume that that is actually. It invariably leads to them accommodating convince for you to buy their pill or machine. It is an one-size fits all system. Of course, there are miracle pills and wonder machines being offered everywhere. Exactly why are so many women still struggling to get…
  • How Shed More Calories Fast — 6 Tips To Burn More Calories Fast

    admin
    20 May 2014 | 10:40 pm
    Losing weight has turn into problem by most people nowadays. Generally, statistics reveal that 65% of adult males and 55% of adult females are overweight/obese. That rather a number right? And i’m pretty without doubt of all the people here article, incredible belong in this overweight nfl. When it comes down to losing pounds fast, diet is focused 75% on the solution. Undoubtedly one of the best diets for losing weight quickly is a “paleo-style” diet based around lean proteins, fish, vegetables, raw fruit, nuts, and seeds with little or no grains or “white” carbs…
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    admin
    10 May 2014 | 5:10 pm
    For too long we are usually hoodwinked by misconceptions and diet supplements. We’ve been blinded by false commercials and advertisements. We have been told how the answer to weight loss comes through a mere product or pill. Quite frankly, we all know they’re all false. Functions to fat loss is a well known fact. We all are able to achieve health inside, but we’ve been lied to for as long that our former ideals have been distorted. Thus, I give all my own engagement ring approach when using this subject. I’m hoping the readers will source the points presented useful in…
  • Lose Flat Abs By Consuming Meals That Shed Extra Pounds

    admin
    7 May 2014 | 5:31 pm
    The picture that was worth above what 1000 categories was of me in a large, formless red sweater and my face plump with added. I looked at it and was struck with the reality of how I just looked. I simply couldn’t stand wearing the “big clothes” anymore, hiding my body and myself from the world. It was time for change and i really decided to lose size. That was the first step – really wanting to shed the weight. An influx of over the counter diet pills has bombarded the market, prompting scientists and researchers to express their concern. These diet pills claim to be…
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    Somatosphere

  • Call for papers – Psychopathological fringes: Historical and social science perspectives on category work in psychiatry by Nicolas Henckes

    Nicolas Henckes
    22 Jul 2014 | 12:30 pm
    Date: 13./14.2.2015 Venue: Berlin, Institute for the History of Medicine, Dahlem Organization: Nicolas Henckes, Volker Hess, Emmanuel Delille, Marie Reinholdt, Stefan Reinsch, Lara Rzesnitzek, Contact: stefanie.voth@charite.de   Over the last few years, the revision process of both the DSM and the Chapter V on mental disorders of the ICD has stimulated within psychiatry a series of attempts at challenging established diagnostic categories. These challenges reflect both dissatisfaction with categories as they are defined in existing diagnostic classifications, and a will to adjust them to…
  • Sperling’s Reasons of Conscience by Nathan Emmerich

    Nathan Emmerich
    16 Jul 2014 | 7:36 am
    Reasons of Conscience: The Bioethics Debate in Germany University of Chicago Press, 2013, 344 pages by Stefan Sperling Sperling’s Reasons of Conscience is an ethnographic study of two German Bioethics commissions – the Enquete Kommission and the Nationaler Ethikrat. His particular focus is on the way that the national, political and cultural context influences the democratic and bureaucratic processes involved in the production of bioethical regulations. These influences can be summarized in terms of the Kantian moral character of German culture, the structural and procedural transparency…
  • The collaborative turn: interdisciplinarity across the human sciences by Des Fitzgerald

    Des Fitzgerald
    14 Jul 2014 | 7:27 am
    Questions of health, medicine and science have long animated sub-disciplinary attentions in the social sciences and humanities. Recently, however, research around these topics has taken a marked collaborative turn. If topics in the medical and health sciences were once straightforward objects of study for anthropological, sociological or philosophical analysis, increasingly, to work ‘on’ such topics often means also to work both ‘with’ and ‘through’ them. While this collaborative turn has been enacted in distinct ways, shaped by national and regional institutional structures and…
  • Gitelman’s Paper Knowledge and Kafka’s The Demon of Writing by Alexander von Lünen

    Alexander von Lünen
    13 Jul 2014 | 5:00 am
    Paper Knowledge: Toward a Media History of Documents Duke University Press, 2012, 224 pages by Lisa Gitelman   The Demon of Writing: Powers and Failures of Paperwork Zone Books, 2012, 208 pages by Ben Kafka   Ben Kafka and Lisa Gitelman, colleagues at New York University, have both written books about the intricate nature of paper as a medium. While Kafka delves into the nature of paper as enabling agent of bureaucracy – i.e. paperwork – Gitelman’s focus is on “documents” and how they were shaped by print and are now transformed by the digital. Given the digitization of…
  • Call for candidates: one-year fellowship at the Laboratoire d’anthropologie sociale of the Collège de France (Paris) by Frédéric Keck

    Frédéric Keck
    8 Jul 2014 | 11:19 am
    The Laboratoire d’anthropologie sociale, based at the Collège de France in Paris, will hire a researcher for a one-year post-doctoral contract starting 1st January 2015 to study the perception of animal diseases in Australia. This position takes part to the project « Social representations of pathogens at the frontiers between species », sponsored by the Axa Research Fund and led by Philippe Descola and Frédéric Keck. The goal of this three-year project is to compare the perception of animal diseases by breeders and health authorities in different parts of the Asia-Pacific area. In…
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    Visual Anthropology of Japan - 日本映像人類学

  • Restroom Etiquette: No Noodles in the Sink!

    22 Jul 2014 | 11:36 pm
    I found this notice posted in the restroom at a certain university in Osaka. Apparently someone doesn't know the rule about noodles in the bathroom...
  • ONLINE COURSE: Visualizing Japan

    19 Jul 2014 | 3:04 am
    Announcement from H-NET Notifications: Harvard-MIT MOOC: Visualizing Japan (1850s-1930s): Westernization, Protest, Modernity Seminar Date: 2014-09-03 Now open for registration. Free! A first-time MIT/Harvard MOOC (Massive Open Online Course), Visualizing Japan opens windows on Japan’s transition into the modern world through the historical visual record. Teachers include John Dower (MIT), Andrew Gordon (Harvard), and Gennifer Weisenfeld (Duke). This co-taught course looks at Japanese history and the skills and questions involved in reading history through images now accessible in digital…
  • "Arrest of Tokyo vagina artist sparks free expression protest"

    16 Jul 2014 | 7:30 am
    Here's an article about Japan's laws related to the visual (especially those deemed "obscene")... From Japan Today, July 16, 2014: Japanese police have arrested a Tokyo artist on obscenity charges for distributing data that allowed recipients to make 3D prints of her vagina, sparking protests over what supporters said was an attack on free expression. Megumi Igarashi, 42, who calls herself Rokude Nashiko which roughly translates as “bastard kid”, had been trying to raise funds online to pay for the construction of a kayak, using a 3D printer, modeled on the shape of her genitals. Japan…
  • ETHNOFEST Athens Ethnographic Film Festival: Call for Films - Xenophobia and the Ethnographic Film

    21 Jun 2014 | 11:30 pm
    The Athens Ethnographic Film Festival continues the exploration of the anthropological world through the image and is looking for films made by anthropologists (or related background), including students' works, either as dissertations or as assignments. The Athens Ethnographic Film Festival is introducing a new themed-screenings section, which will be showcasing ethnographic films focused on particular social issues. This year's theme is "xenophobia". As we consider issues of racist violence, aggressive expressions of nationalism and social exclusion to be of pressing relevance for the…
  • "Interrogation audiovisual recordings set to expand"

    20 Jun 2014 | 12:32 am
    From The Japan News, 20 June 2014: The Supreme Public Prosecutors Office said Wednesday it will expand the test interrogation audiovisual recording program from October. Currently under the program, public prosecutors record the questioning of criminal suspects in cases with lay judges, as well as suspects with mental disorders. The recording is conducted as part of prosecutors’ three-year efforts to restore credibility that was undermined by evidence falsification and cover-up scandals at the Osaka District Public Prosecutors Office. Now that the program has proved the recordings’…
 
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    International Cognition and Culture Institute

  • Random choice among the Kantu, swidden agriculturalists of Kalimantan

    19 Jul 2014 | 8:32 am
    An excellent post by Michael Schulson at Aeon magazine entitled "How to choose? When your reasons are worse than useless, sometimes the most rational choice is a random stab in the dark," showing, among other things, how rationality and expectations of rationality can clash."In the 1970s, a young American anthropologist named Michael Dove set out for Indonesia, intending to solve an ethnographic mystery. Then a graduate student at Stanford, Dove had been reading about the Kantu’, a group of subsistence farmers who live in the tropical forests of Borneo. The Kantu’…
  • Alberto Acerbi on cultural evolution

    18 Jun 2014 | 1:49 am
    Alberto Acerbi's excellent blog hosts a noteworthy discussion of Claidière, Scott-Phillips and Sperber's recent PTRS paper on cultural attraction. Alex Mesoudi, Thom Scott-Phillips and Dan Speber joined the discussion; Alberto concluded it.
  • Babies' and birds' causal understanding

    15 Jun 2014 | 3:37 am
    A very interesting comparison between crows and humans in a new (free access) paper in Proceedings of the Royal Society B entitled "Of babies and birds: complex tool behaviours are not sufficient for the evolution of the ability to create a novel causal ntervention" by Alex H. Taylor, Lucy G. Cheke, Anna Waismeyer, Andrew N. Meltzoff, Rachael Miller, Alison Gopnik, Nicola S. Clayton, and Russell D. Gray. Abstract: Humans are capable of simply observing a correlation between cause and effect, and then producing a novel behavioural pattern in order to recreate…
  • Kinship, theology and deep grammar

    13 May 2014 | 3:22 am
    One of the most salient paradoxes in the study of kinship systems is their sheer analytical complexity, from the point of view of an external observer, and simultaneously the ease by which those very same systems are assimilated by the natives themselves. Whereas no special training, costly rituals, harsh indoctrination seems to be needed to master the intricacies of kinship terminologies and marriage rules for those who are born into them, the situation for the anthropologist seems to be the very opposite. What could be the reason for this apparent inconsistency, simplicity for the native…
  • Deparmental Lectureship in Cognitive Anthropology, Oxford

    12 May 2014 | 7:30 am
    Applications are invited for a Departmental Lectureship in Cognitive Anthropology, effective from 1 September 2014, tenable until 30 September 2015. The post is based at the School of Anthropology, Banbury Road, Oxford, UK. The primary function of this post is to engage in lecturing, tutoring and the supervision of graduates and undergraduate students in cognitive and evolutionary anthropology. 
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    media/anthropology

  • The year of the freedom technologist

    John Postill
    9 Jul 2014 | 7:04 pm
    By John Postill. Republished from Savage Minds Two and a half years ago, TIME magazine declared 2011 to be The Year of the Protester. From the Arab Spring or Spain’s indignados to the Occupy movement, this was undoubtedly a year of political upheaval around the world. But 2011 was also an important year for a new global vanguard of tech-minded citizens determined to bring about political change, often in connection with national crises. Let us call these citizens, at least for the time being, freedom technologists. Consider, for instance, the loose network of freedom technologists who…
  • Podemos: Spain’s new ‘transmedia’ party

    John Postill
    12 Jun 2014 | 11:31 am
                      One of the biggest surprises in the recent European elections has been the sudden rise of the Spanish party Podemos (“We Can”), which obtained 8% of the vote in Spain. Podemos is a 4-month old, leftist formation rooted in the indignados (15M) movement and led by the charismatic political scientist Pablo Iglesias, 35. The following passage (my rough translation) is from a thoughtful analysis of the elections published today by another 15M-based party, Partido X, which is currently critically reviewing its own campaign.
  • Afterword to Consent of the Networked by Rebecca MacKinnon

    John Postill
    20 May 2014 | 7:11 pm
    The Worldwide Struggle for Internet Freedom. A book by Rebecca MacKinnon. http://consentofthenetworked.com/afterword-paperback/ In late January 2012, thousands of people across Poland took to the streets to protest the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA). The treaty had already been signed in late 2011 by European Union trade negotiators and twenty-two EU member states without much media attention, but by early February anti-ACTA protests had spread to over two hundred cities across Europe. Politicians got the message. On July 4, 2012, the European Parliament voted overwhelmingly…
  • Global directory of freedom technologists: projects, networks, organisations

    John Postill
    19 May 2014 | 8:53 am
    This is a working directory of some of the global projects, networks and organisations where leading freedom technologists — that is, individuals who combine technological and socio-political skills to pursue greater internet and democratic freedoms — congregate and collaborate. It is part of current research towards my forthcoming book Hacker, Lawyer, Journalist, Spy: Freedom Technologists and Political Change in an Age of Global Protest. Please note that I am only including initiatives with a global remit, rather than a national or regional one. Further suggestions are always very…
  • Freedom technologists and the new protest movements: a theory of protest formulas

    John Postill
    2 May 2014 | 7:06 am
    20 July 2014 update: Now published online ahead of print here: Postill, J. in press. Freedom technologists and the new protest movements: a theory of protest formulas. Special issue of Convergence journal, “New Media, Global Activism and Politics” Vol. 20, no. 3 (2014) [1] [PDF] See also Global directory of freedom technologists: projects, networks, organisations Abstract In this article I draw from anthropological fieldwork in Spain and secondary research on Tunisia and Iceland to explore the connection between internet freedom activism and post-2008 protest movements. I introduce two…
 
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    BOAS Network

  • Imperiled Amazon Indians Make 1st Contact with Outsiders

    BOAS
    10 Jul 2014 | 1:08 pm
    By Megan Gannon, News Editor | July 03, 2014 12:27pm ET Report Retrieved from Live Science Indigenous people with no prior contact to the outside world have just emerged from the Amazon rainforest in Brazil and made contact with a group of settled Indians, after being spotted migrating to evade illegal loggers, advocates say. The news, which was released July 2, comes after sightings of the uncontacted Indians in Brazil near the border with Peru, according to the group Survival International. Officials with the organization had warned last month that the isolated tribes face threats of…
  • ADHD and Evolution: Were Hyperactive Hunter-Gatherers Better Adapted?

    Joyce Mancini
    19 Jun 2014 | 12:07 pm
    Retrieved from Healthline Written by Brian Krans Medically Reviewed on November 25, 2012 by George Krucik, MD, MBA It can be hard for someone with ADHD to pay attention in boring lectures, stay focused on any one subject for long, or sit still when they just want to get up and go. People with ADHD are often those who stare out the window, daydreaming about what’s outside. It can feel at times like the structure of civilized society is too rigid and sedentary for those with brains that want to go, go, go. It’s an understandable viewpoint, considering that for 8 million years since the…
  • Archaeological cave dig unearths artefacts from 45,000 years ago

    Joyce Mancini
    16 Jun 2014 | 1:04 pm
    Photo Significant finding: Digging in the Ganga Maya Cave in the Pilbara. By Tim Barlass. June 14, 2014. Retrieved from The Sydney Morning Herald An archeological dig has revealed artefacts of early occupation so old they rival the dates of those found at sites of the earliest human settlement in Australia. The discovery of the artefacts of animal bone and charcoal at the Ganga Maya Cave (named by traditional owners meaning ‘house on the hill’) in the Pilbara region of Western Australia are the subject of a scientific paper not yet submitted to archaeological journals. The items…
  • Developmental Origins of Pregnancy Loss in the Common Marmoset

    Natalia Reagan
    12 Jun 2014 | 2:30 pm
    Full Title: Developmental Origins of Pregnancy Loss in the Adult Female Common Marmoset Monkey (Callithrix jacchus) Julienne N. Rutherford , Victoria A. deMartelly, Donna G. Layne Colon, Corinna N. Ross, Suzette D. Tardif Abstract Background The impact of the intrauterine environment on the developmental programming of adult female reproductive success is still poorly understood and potentially underestimated. Litter size variation in a nonhuman primate, the common marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus), allows us to model the effects of varying intrauterine environments (e.g. nutrient…
  • George J. Armelagos, Anthropologist Who Told Skeletons’ Tales, Dies at 77

    Joyce Mancini
    8 Jun 2014 | 12:12 pm
    Retrieved from the New York Times By MARGALIT FOXJUNE 6, 2014 George J. Armelagos was a reader of bones. Professor Armelagos (pronounced ar-MEL-ah-gos) was no osteomancer, as one who would divine the future by studying skeletal remains is known. Instead, the professor, a distinguished anthropologist who died on May 15 at 77, studied bones to divine the past. His death, from pancreatic cancer at his home in Atlanta, was announced by Emory University, where he was the Goodrich C. White professor of anthropology. Professor Armelagos was one of the founders of paleopathology, a discipline that…
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