Anthropology

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  • Neandertal demise followed contact with modern humans (but not immediately)

    Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog
    Dienekes
    20 Aug 2014 | 2:35 pm
    Important:Southern Iberia has been held to represent an exception to a wider European pattern21, with late survival of Neanderthals previously argued at sites such as Gorham’s Cave, Gibraltar22. We could not reproduce any of the late dates from sites in this region15 (Supplementary Methods) and it is apparent that many previous determinations underestimate the real age. It is unclear how long Neanderthals persisted in southern Iberia15.Nature 512, 306–309 (21 August 2014) doi:10.1038/nature13621 The timing and spatiotemporal patterning of Neanderthal disappearance Tom Higham et al. The…
  • Prehistoric migrations: DNA study unravels the settlement history of the New World Arctic

    Anthropology News -- ScienceDaily
    28 Aug 2014 | 11:27 am
    A new DNA study unravels the settlement history of the New World Arctic. We know people have lived in the New World Arctic for about 5,000 years. Archaeological evidence clearly shows that a variety of cultures survived the harsh climate in Alaska, Canada and Greenland for thousands of years. Despite this, there are several unanswered questions about these people.
  • Dr. Yonatan Sahle and the African Origins of Human Intelligence

    Anthropology.net
    Kambiz Kamrani
    2 Mar 2014 | 7:13 am
    Dr. Yonatan Sahle now holds the Glenn Isaac Postdoctoral Seat in the Human Evolution Research Center at UC Berkeley. He recently gave a talk at my alma mater on the African Origins of Human Intelligence at CSU East Bay. You all may know that our early ancestors diverged from sub-Saharan populations approx 100,000 – 250,000 years ago. Our technology during this transition was prolific. Dr. Sahle discusses this, along with what he has recently found, the earliest projectile points in the world. His entire talk is listed above…. Take time to check out this excerpt from the Q&A…
  • Web Roundup: Ebola by Sara M Bergstresser

    Somatosphere
    Sara M Bergstresser
    31 Aug 2014 | 4:26 pm
    When I teach Medical Anthropology, we talk about globalization and infectious disease, with a focus on the increasing speed of global travel. Typically, I discuss a hypothetical epidemic that could accompany a traveller from a distant continent to the local airport. This year, a hypothetical epidemic will not be necessary. Instead, we have the rapid spread of Ebola, poised to make this airline-mediated leap. Of course, showing how it may be coming to get “you” is a means to help students understand that viruses in distant lands are not so distant after all. In a Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel…
  • Anth 207: new open education space – update!

    Neuroanthropology
    gregdowney
    22 Aug 2014 | 5:34 am
    If you follow Neuroanthropology, either here or on Facebook, you may have noticed something new. We’ve had a bit of a facelift to this site and added a page: Anth 207 Neuroanth 101. This new venture is an effort to generate open educational resources for people interested in psychological anthropology: students, teachers, researchers, the curious… The first video for Anth 207  Neuroanth 101 is already posted: WEIRD psychology. We’ll be adding more videos slowly, as well as suggested readings, other related resources, reflection questions, and notes. The goal is to start…
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    anthropology - Yahoo News Search Results

  • Spain returns Colombian treasure

    1 Sep 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Bogota, Sep 2 (IANS/EFE) Spain has returned to Colombia 691 indigenous artefacts seized in a police operation 11 years ago. The items - from different epochs, cultures and regions, include objects with organic and geometric designs, the Colombian Anthropology and History Institute (ICANH) said. Most of the ceramic items are of huge cultural and archaeological value, and date back to 1400 BC. The ...
  • Abstracted anthropology

    31 Aug 2014 | 9:52 pm
    When research is on representations rather than fieldwork what kind of anthropology do we get? Read more
  • The dreaded double major

    30 Aug 2014 | 11:26 am
    When it came to picking a college major, senior Chris Benson took the do-it-yourself approach. The 21-year-old is juggling a double major in history along with a joint degree in anthropology and sociology. On top of both majors, he’s also double minoring in Arabic and Islamic world studies. “Basically, I needed an area to study [...]
  • 2 new Maya civilization centers studied in Mexico

    26 Aug 2014 | 3:53 pm
    In this Oct. 28, 2013 image released by Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) on Monday Aug. 25, 2014, ruins belonging to an ancient Maya city called Lagunita stand out in the jungle on a remote location in the southern state of Campeche, Mexico.
  • Grappling With Trigger Warnings And Trauma On Campus

    21 Aug 2014 | 2:37 am
    Are trigger warnings a good idea when teachers ask students to consider material about emotionally wrenching topics? Anthropologist Barbara J. King says yes — in some cases.
 
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    Anthropology.net

  • Lagunita and Tamchén, Two Newly Discovered Mayan Sites

    Kambiz Kamrani
    20 Aug 2014 | 4:28 pm
    Two large Maya sites in the Yucatana have been (re) discovered by Ivan Šprajc from the Research Centre of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts. The sites in the northern part of the Calakmul Biosphere Reserve which is are in the southeast part of Campeche, close to the towns of Xpujil and Zoh Laguna. I used the phrase rediscoveries because one of the sites was visited by Eric Von Euw in the 1970’s He documented the extraordinary façade which I pictured below. He described it as an earth monster with its open and drew it out. His drawings are at the Peabody Museum. The exact…
  • Human Fossil Databases & Data Theft

    Kambiz Kamrani
    20 Aug 2014 | 3:26 pm
    Hominid fossil databases are a very difficult undertaking to curate and create. One of my mentors and colleagues, Dr. Henry Gilbert created a very impressive Fossilized.org database. He organized the fossils based upon geography, phylogenetics, history, species, and geochronology. I consider it a one of a kind database. It troubles me to see that Hans Peter, author of the German website, The Evolution of Man, has taken all of Dr. Gilbert’s data and used it in his own database without any citation. This is is blatant data theft and it is disrespectful. Gilbert has a liberal copyright…
  • Why Do Young Earth Creationists Only Know Of Lucy?

    Kambiz Kamrani
    2 Jul 2014 | 1:42 pm
    Adam Benton from EvoAnth has published an interesting paper where he tries to understand why Young Earth Creationists are consistently ignorant of other fossil hominids. To help answer his question, he analyzed how three prominent creationist websites are represent the hominin fossil record. Benton searched for mentions of five other hominid species that are just as important as Lucy and ideally should be represented just as in-depth. The results of his study are shown in the table below. It shows how many times these websites refer each of the fossils under consideration. You can clearly…
  • Integrating Health

    nataliamagnani
    19 Mar 2014 | 12:46 pm
    When dealing with the term “medicine,” there is no single definition, static through space and time.  Many of the world’s medical systems illustrate diverging, sometimes opposing, stories of health and healing, and each culture invariably believes in its own medicine. Unfortunately, our globalized world has been slow to recognize the medicine of the “other.”  Last month the Prince of Wales was dismayed by delay tactics of the government in creating a register of healthcare practitioners that would include alternative, complementary, and holistic professionals alongside their…
  • Dr. Yonatan Sahle and the African Origins of Human Intelligence

    Kambiz Kamrani
    2 Mar 2014 | 7:13 am
    Dr. Yonatan Sahle now holds the Glenn Isaac Postdoctoral Seat in the Human Evolution Research Center at UC Berkeley. He recently gave a talk at my alma mater on the African Origins of Human Intelligence at CSU East Bay. You all may know that our early ancestors diverged from sub-Saharan populations approx 100,000 – 250,000 years ago. Our technology during this transition was prolific. Dr. Sahle discusses this, along with what he has recently found, the earliest projectile points in the world. His entire talk is listed above…. Take time to check out this excerpt from the Q&A…
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    Savage Minds

  • Around the Web Digest: Week of August 24

    Dick Powis
    31 Aug 2014 | 10:08 am
    If, like me, you’ve been living under a rock this week, here are some things you may have missed. (From the size of this list, I feel like I missed a lot.) If you have something that you’d like me to feature next weekend, please send it to me at richard.powis@gmail.com or on Twitter at @dtpowis. A new anthropology MOOC is starting up on edX, called World101x: Anthropology of Current World Issues. (World101x) Gerhard Hoffstaedter, course director of World101x, has written on the immigration from the perspective of Australia’s own crisis. (HuffPo) Also, be sure to check out the World101x…
  • “Everyone was running little magazines in those days”

    Rex
    28 Aug 2014 | 3:53 pm
    I recently went a conference where I had a chance to meet Nikolas Rose recently. I’m always interested to meet Famous Professors to see how they do it — what unique combination of personality traits got them, well frankly, tenure. Isn’t that something every academic should start keeping track of? I’m pleased to say that Rose’s success –as far as I can tell — is due to his genuine pleasantness and keen desire to keep his nose down in the weeds and keep producing substantive ethnographic/historical work. Its always a pleasure to meet someone who has…
  • Is the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge about structural inequality?

    Matt Thompson
    27 Aug 2014 | 5:52 pm
    In case you have been living under a rock (or in the field, either is permissible for an anthro really) you may not have noticed that everyone and their mother is dumping ice water on their head in the name of ALS. Watching this fad unfold has provided Internet observers and other semi-employed persons an extraordinarily rich phenomenon to critique. First of all, there’s a lot to like about the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. By means of this fad I have learned that I have friends, Facebook friends, and friends of friends, who have loved ones or have lost someone because of this disease.
  • Boasian Critiques of Race in “The Nation”: SMOPS 12

    Rex
    27 Aug 2014 | 12:21 pm
    I’m delighted to feature this, our dozenenth SMOPS, for readers. These papers provide an excellent example of anthropology’s long term commitment to social justice, public outreach, and a critique of incorrect folk theories of heredity and race. The real gems of this paper are not Boas or Herskovits or even Sapir, but the sparkling, penetrating papers by Hendrik Willem Van Loon and, especially, Konrad Bercovici. Read them first. I’m also delighted that this issue of SMOPS is the first to feature an introduction by someone other than me. I’d like to thank Richard Handler, a…
  • The Trouble with Teaching (and a call for help)

    Dustin (Oneman)
    26 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    This week, I embark on my 12th year as an adjunct at the College of Southern Nevada (formerly the Community College of Southern Nevada, which I much prefer — they changed the name in a bid to sound classier). For the last 11 years, I’ve taught intro-level anthropology, even as my career shifted from academia into the museum world. Teaching is a choice for me. I have a full-time job, a MORE than full-time job, running the Burlesque Hall of Fame, and much of what little spare time I have left is spent as a caretaker for my father (who suffers from Alzheimer’s) and maintaining some kind of…
 
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    Anthropology News -- ScienceDaily

  • Prehistoric migrations: DNA study unravels the settlement history of the New World Arctic

    28 Aug 2014 | 11:27 am
    A new DNA study unravels the settlement history of the New World Arctic. We know people have lived in the New World Arctic for about 5,000 years. Archaeological evidence clearly shows that a variety of cultures survived the harsh climate in Alaska, Canada and Greenland for thousands of years. Despite this, there are several unanswered questions about these people.
  • New research reveals how wild rabbits were genetically transformed into tame rabbits

    28 Aug 2014 | 11:27 am
    The genetic changes that transformed wild animals into domesticated forms have long been a mystery. An international team of scientists has now made a breakthrough by showing that many genes controlling the development of the brain and the nervous system were particularly important for rabbit domestication. The study gives answers to many genetic questions.
  • Ancient metal workers were not slaves but highly regarded craftsmen

    28 Aug 2014 | 8:09 am
    In the course of ongoing excavations at Timna Valley, archaeologists analyzed remnants of food eaten by copper smelters 3,000 years ago. This analysis indicates that the laborers operating the furnaces were in fact skilled craftsmen who enjoyed high social status and adulation. They believe their discovery may have ramifications for similar sites across the region.
  • Stone-tipped spears lethal, may indicate early cognitive and social skills

    27 Aug 2014 | 11:16 am
    Attaching a stone tip on to a wooden spear shaft was a significant innovation for early modern humans living around 500,000 years ago. However, it was also a costly behavior in terms of time and effort to collect, prepare and assemble the spear. Researchers conducted controlled experiments to learn if there was a 'wounding' advantage between using a wooden spear or a stone-tipped spear.
  • Evolution used similar molecular toolkits to shape flies, worms, and humans

    27 Aug 2014 | 10:16 am
    Although separated by hundreds of millions of years of evolution, flies, worms, and humans share ancient patterns of gene expression, according to a massive analysis of genomic data. Two related studies tell a similar story: even though humans, worms, and flies bear little obvious similarity to each other, evolution used remarkably similar molecular toolkits to shape them.
 
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    Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog

  • The prehistory of New World Arctic (Raghavan et al. 2014)

    Dienekes
    28 Aug 2014 | 1:20 pm
    Science 29 August 2014: Vol. 345 no. 6200 DOI: 10.1126/science.1255832 The genetic prehistory of the New World ArcticMaanasa Raghavan et al. The New World Arctic, the last region of the Americas to be populated by humans, has a relatively well-researched archaeology, but an understanding of its genetic history is lacking. We present genome-wide sequence data from ancient and present-day humans from Greenland, Arctic Canada, Alaska, Aleutian Islands, and Siberia. We show that Paleo-Eskimos (~3000 BCE to 1300 CE) represent a migration pulse into the Americas independent of both Native American…
  • Ancient Y-DNA from China

    Dienekes
    20 Aug 2014 | 2:46 pm
    From the paper: Dividing the samples further using social status shows that the six aristocrats had haplogroups Q1a1, O3a, and N, the 14 commoners had haplogroups Q1a1, O3a, and O*, and the seven slaves had haplogroups O3a, O2a, and O* (Fig. 2). Am. J. Hum. Biol. DOI: 10.1002/ajhb.22604Ancient DNA evidence reveals that the Y chromosome haplogroup Q1a1 admixed into the Han Chinese 3,000 years ago Yong-Bin Zhao et al. Objectives Y chromosome haplogroup Q1a1 is found almost only in Han Chinese populations. However, it has not been found in ancient Han Chinese samples until now. Thus, the…
  • Neandertal demise followed contact with modern humans (but not immediately)

    Dienekes
    20 Aug 2014 | 2:35 pm
    Important:Southern Iberia has been held to represent an exception to a wider European pattern21, with late survival of Neanderthals previously argued at sites such as Gorham’s Cave, Gibraltar22. We could not reproduce any of the late dates from sites in this region15 (Supplementary Methods) and it is apparent that many previous determinations underestimate the real age. It is unclear how long Neanderthals persisted in southern Iberia15.Nature 512, 306–309 (21 August 2014) doi:10.1038/nature13621 The timing and spatiotemporal patterning of Neanderthal disappearance Tom Higham et al. The…
  • Tuberculosis is 6,000 years old

    Dienekes
    20 Aug 2014 | 2:23 pm
    ... and sea mammals (not Europeans) introduced it to the New World.Nature (2014) doi:10.1038/nature13591Pre-Columbian mycobacterial genomes reveal seals as a source of New World human tuberculosis Kirsten I. Bos et al. Modern strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from the Americas are closely related to those from Europe, supporting the assumption that human tuberculosis was introduced post-contact1. This notion, however, is incompatible with archaeological evidence of pre-contact tuberculosis in the New World2. Comparative genomics of modern isolates suggests that M. tuberculosis attained…
  • Indo-Europeans preceded Finno-Ugrians in Finland and Estonia

    Dienekes
    16 Aug 2014 | 11:00 pm
    According to an abstract of a Ph.D thesis (below). This would appear to work well with the dating of the signature Y-chromosome haplogroup of Finno-Ugrians. Bidrag till Fennoskandiens språkliga förhistoria i tid och rum (Heikkilä, Mikko)My academic dissertation "Bidrag till Fennoskandiens språkliga förhistoria i tid och rum" ("Spatiotemporal Contributions to the Linguistic Prehistory of Fennoscandia") is an interdisciplinary study of the linguistic prehistory of Northern Europe chiefly in the Iron Age (ca. 700 BC―AD 1200), but also to some extent in the Bronze Age (ca. 1700―700…
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    ZERO ANTHROPOLOGY

  • Iatrogenic Imperialism

    Maximilian Forte
    1 Sep 2014 | 6:57 am
    The following is an extract from Émile St-Pierre’s chapter, “Iatrogenic Imperialism: NGOs and CROs as Agents of Questionable Care,” published in Good Intentions: Norms and Practices of Imperial Humanitarianism (Montreal: Alert Press, 2014), pp. 37-55: Overview: Émile St-Pierre examines the role of NGOs and Contract Research Organizations (CROs) in the formation and propagation of a neoliberal paradigm in health care. As St-Pierre explains, neoliberal policies beginning in the 1980s forced many states to retract from health care provision. NGOs and CROs have emerged as gap fillers in…
  • Imperial Abduction: The Globalization of Residential Schooling

    Maximilian Forte
    29 Aug 2014 | 6:20 pm
    The following is an extract from my chapter, “Imperial Abduction Lore and Humanitarian Seduction,” which serves as the introduction to Good Intentions: Norms and Practices of Imperial Humanitarianism (Montreal: Alert Press, 2014), pp. 1-34: In Canada, there have been official government apologies for the abuses committed during the residential schooling era (which lasted until 1996), plus monetary compensation, and a truth and reconciliation commission that was constituted and recently finished its work. Nonetheless the fundamental ethos of residential schooling has not only been…
  • Civil Society, NGOs, and Saving the Needy: Imperial Neoliberalism

    Maximilian Forte
    28 Aug 2014 | 3:56 pm
    The following is an extract from my chapter, “Imperial Abduction Lore and Humanitarian Seduction,” which serves as the introduction to Good Intentions: Norms and Practices of Imperial Humanitarianism (Montreal: Alert Press, 2014), pp. 1-34: Outsourcing Empire, Privatizing State Functions: NGOs First, we need to get a sense of the size and scope of the spread of just those NGOs that work on an international plane, or INGOs, many of which are officially associated with, though not part of, the UN. Estimates of the number of INGOs (such as Care, Oxfam, Médecins Sans Frontières) vary…
  • The Syndrome of Humanitarian Interventionism

    Maximilian Forte
    27 Aug 2014 | 7:04 pm
    The following is an extract from my chapter, “Imperial Abduction Lore and Humanitarian Seduction,” which serves as the introduction to Good Intentions: Norms and Practices of Imperial Humanitarianism (Montreal: Alert Press, 2014), pp. 1-34: The dominant ideology of US-led globalization since September 11, 2001, is one that configures society as existing in a state of emergency—one that constructs exceptional circumstances, where exceptional rules and exceptional self-representations prevail. A defining feature of this post-9/11 orientation is therefore one that frames perceptions or…
  • Nature, Culture, and Imperial Beliefs

    Maximilian Forte
    26 Aug 2014 | 2:30 pm
    The following is an extract from my chapter, “Imperial Abduction Lore and Humanitarian Seduction,” which serves as the introduction to Good Intentions: Norms and Practices of Imperial Humanitarianism (Montreal: Alert Press, 2014), pp. 1-34: Two of the most enduring beliefs, among at least the political elites and a substantial portion of the wider population in North America, are that military intervention abroad and all sorts of other less forceful interventions, are: (a) for the good of other societies, whose lives and whose very nature as human beings will experience progress as a…
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    Material World

  • RAI Horniman Museum Collecting Initiative (2014-2015)

    Haidy Geismar
    2 Sep 2014 | 3:30 am
    As part of Collections People Stories: Anthropology Re-Considered, an Arts Council England (ACE) funded project taking place at the Horniman Museum, 2012-2015, we are seeking PhD Students or Postdoctoral Fellows, who plan to carry out fieldwork in 2014-2015 to make small collections for the museum. Deadline: 30 September 2014 Collections People Stories: Anthropology Re-Considered is undertaking a detailed review and documentation of the Horniman’s Anthropology collections, highlighting the range, scale and importance of both its stored collections and those on display. The project sets…
  • EASA review

    Patrick LAVIOLETTE
    17 Aug 2014 | 2:00 pm
    Theodoros Kyriakides (a doctoral candidate in the anthropology of illness at the University of Manchester) provides a blog review for Savage Minds of the recent 13th Biennial EASA conference, held at Tallinn University in Estonia from 31 July to 3 August. Over at the Allegra site, one can find some recent interviews with EASA President Noel Salazar as well as the co-chairs of the conference’s scientific committee, Carlo Cubero and Patrick Laviolette. A visual archive of the conference has also been collated.  … Continue Reading
  • Best of Material World: Digital Media

    Heather Horst
    7 Aug 2014 | 6:00 am
    Since the Material World Blog began, the digital media landscape changed dramatically. In social media terms, we have moved from Friendster, MySpace and Orkut to Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and WhatsApp, with a range of other digital, mobile and social media becoming embedded within many people’s everyday lives around the world. These transformations resulted in an increasing number of posts that explored the changing relationships with digital media and made visible the materiality of the digital worlds. In my review of the best of digital media on Material World Blog, five key…
  • Best of Material World Blog: Landscape and Place

    Patrick LAVIOLETTE
    23 Jul 2014 | 11:34 am
    Patrick Laviolette (EHI, Tallinn University, hosts of EASA2014) In terms of providing reflections on the material dimensions of place and landscape, here are some links to what I feel have been amongst the more provocative postings on the blog over the years. Many of the authors to the links below implicitly, or sometimes even explicitly ask: how do we depict our spatial experiences through the digital medium of blogging? In Feb 2007, Graeme Were put up a piece simply entitled ‘Footpaths‘ byKate Cameron-Daum. It is an eye-catching post which stirred my own curiosity on methods of…
  • Made in Palestine

    Haidy Geismar
    17 Jul 2014 | 4:16 am
    Christopher Pinney, UCL [Please note: this  post was written before the intensification of the current Israeli offensive on Gaza] I decided to transgress the BDS (Boycott, Disinvestment and Sanctions) injunction and attend a conference on ‘The Photographic Imagination’ in Tel Aviv in June 2014 for several reasons.  The two central ones concerned, firstly, the Apartheid analogy. Having taught a short course at the University of Cape Town in 2000 it was quite apparent that there were many courageous dissident academic intellectuals that had been a key element of the resistance during the…
 
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    Museum Anthropology

  • Museum Anthropology Leaders: Sheila Goff, History Colorado, Denver, Part 2

    30 Aug 2014 | 11:58 am
    Exclusive Museum Anthropology Blog Interview with Sheila Goff, History Colorado, Denver This interview is the second installment in a new series, Museum Anthropology Leaders, where blog intern Lillia McEnaney will be interviewing various anthropological museum professionals. The first installment in the series was with Alaka Wali at the Field Museum.  This is Part 2 of 2. Do you have a
  • Invitation to the International Conference: Archaeology 2015, Ancient Cultures in the Lands of the Bible, Jerusalem, June 2015

    29 Aug 2014 | 1:30 pm
    Call for Abstracts:  The scientific committee of the conference invites experts to submit abstracts on the conference topics. The list of topics is presented on the conference web-site: Archaeology Israel More details on the conference are available on the site.     For questions contact: desk@archaeologyisrael.com
  • $1.5 Million In Grants Go Out To Help Tribes, Museums, Alaska Native Villages Regain Human Remains And Cultural Objects

    25 Aug 2014 | 1:29 pm
    The National Parks Traveller August 23, 2014 The National Park Service has released more than $1.5 million in grants under the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act to assist museums, Indian tribes, and Alaska native villages to document and return human remains and cultural objects to their native people. Grants were awarded both to support the efforts of museums
  • Northwest Indian College Tribal Museum Studies Program

    22 Aug 2014 | 11:00 am
    TMSD 201 Introduction to Tribal Museum Studies Course Instructor: Sara Siestreem, MFA This course and program is offered ONLINE in a hybrid format. Hybrid courses are supported through regularly scheduled video conferencing (face-to-face) classes with the instructor. Class includes 4 hours of academic study each week. This includes 2 hours of face-to-face class time and
  • Museum Anthropology Leaders: Sheila Goff, History Colorado, Denver, Part 1

    19 Aug 2014 | 2:25 pm
    Exclusive Museum Anthropology Blog Interview with Sheila Goff, History Colorado, Denver This interview is the second installment in a new series, Museum Anthropology Leaders, where blog intern Lillia McEnaney will be interviewing various anthropological museum professionals. The first installment in the series was with Alaka Wali at the Field Museum.  Sheila Goff is the NAGPRA Liaison/
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    Kimberly Christian's Garcinia Cambogia

  • Burn More Fat Easy Methods To Burn More Fat

    admin
    13 Aug 2014 | 10:04 am
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    admin
    13 Aug 2014 | 2:26 am
    Bouncing could be the simplest of the rebounding exercises. it correctly, stand within middle belonging to the rebounder, with your feet shoulder-width apart and start bouncing. Begin this exercise very gently and surely able to balance yourself properly, start bouncing more rigid. The more you bend your knees, much more you can bounce harder. However, take care not to lift an individual a far too much, definitely disbalance . To make this exercise very much effective, make it strenuous by starting to jog at one put. Research has shown that bouncing and jogging on a rebounder share the same…
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    admin
    7 Aug 2014 | 5:51 am
    Natural Cure Gout Remedies are on the list of fastest growing therapy for the most painful type of arthritis, gout. But do you know that millions of consumers are becoming addicted to painkillers for their gout pain? Although the minds and principles of reduced glycemic index diet selection and are healthy, there is little change evidence to suggest that simply eating foods with a lower GI could make you lose excessive fat. There are other things to factor in, in addition to quantity of food eaten (and in order that the number of calories), and activity qualifications. If you eat 3000…
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    admin
    20 May 2014 | 10:40 pm
    Losing weight has turn into problem by most people nowadays. Generally, statistics reveal that 65% of adult males and 55% of adult females are overweight/obese. That rather a number right? And i’m pretty without doubt of all the people here article, incredible belong in this overweight nfl. When it comes down to losing pounds fast, diet is focused 75% on the solution. Undoubtedly one of the best diets for losing weight quickly is a “paleo-style” diet based around lean proteins, fish, vegetables, raw fruit, nuts, and seeds with little or no grains or “white” carbs…
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    admin
    10 May 2014 | 5:10 pm
    For too long we are usually hoodwinked by misconceptions and diet supplements. We’ve been blinded by false commercials and advertisements. We have been told how the answer to weight loss comes through a mere product or pill. Quite frankly, we all know they’re all false. Functions to fat loss is a well known fact. We all are able to achieve health inside, but we’ve been lied to for as long that our former ideals have been distorted. Thus, I give all my own engagement ring approach when using this subject. I’m hoping the readers will source the points presented useful in…
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    Somatosphere

  • Encounters of Violence and Care: Central American Transit Migration through Mexico by Kristin Yarris

    Kristin Yarris
    2 Sep 2014 | 12:15 am
    Poster hanging inside Instituto Nacional de Migración (INM), Mazatlán. Photo by Kristin Yarris. A polarized emphasis on origin and destination in international migration studies has left the process of transit itself relatively under-theorized. Taking transit as a site of inquiry moves us as migration scholars beyond the binaries of push/pull factors and origin/destination countries. As medical anthropologists, we are interested in the analytical implications of studying zones of transit for the way we think about illegality, humanity, and encounters of care that sustain the possibilities…
  • Web Roundup: Ebola by Sara M Bergstresser

    Sara M Bergstresser
    31 Aug 2014 | 4:26 pm
    When I teach Medical Anthropology, we talk about globalization and infectious disease, with a focus on the increasing speed of global travel. Typically, I discuss a hypothetical epidemic that could accompany a traveller from a distant continent to the local airport. This year, a hypothetical epidemic will not be necessary. Instead, we have the rapid spread of Ebola, poised to make this airline-mediated leap. Of course, showing how it may be coming to get “you” is a means to help students understand that viruses in distant lands are not so distant after all. In a Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel…
  • Book review: Reimagining Global Health by Piyush Pushkar

    Piyush Pushkar
    29 Aug 2014 | 12:15 am
    Reimagining Global Health: An Introduction Edited by Paul Farmer, Jim Yong Kim, Arthur Kleinman, Matthew Basilico University of California Press, 2013, 478 pages   This textbook was written for an undergraduate course on global health at Harvard University, compulsory for those enrolled at Harvard Medical School. It aims to introduce ethical, social, economic, and political theories and methods to medics in order to critically inform their analyses of the frameworks used to build and justify global health movements. As such, the emphasis is on giving the reader the capacity to do the…
  • Julie Livingston’s Improvising Medicine by Marissa Mika

    Marissa Mika
    27 Aug 2014 | 12:15 am
    Improvising Medicine: An African Oncology Ward in an Emerging Cancer Epidemic by Julie Livingston Duke University Press, 2012   Julie Livingston’s Improvising Medicine is a lucid, poignant, and devastating book about the stakes of a growing cancer epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa that is trailing the HIV/AIDS epidemic. This ethnography takes place mainly on the recently established oncology ward of Princess Marina Hospital in Gabarone, Botswana. It follows the labors of Dr. P, the tireless, irascible German oncologist, a staff of dedicated Batswana nurses, and family caregivers as they…
  • The Recent History of “Contagious Shooting” (1982-2006) and more recent events in Ferguson, Missouri by Stephen T. Casper

    Stephen T. Casper
    25 Aug 2014 | 8:41 am
    A version of this post first appeared on Stephen T. Casper’s blog, The Neuro Times. In the decade since the “Decade of the Brain,” the neurosciences have acquired a spectacular cache in the humanities and social sciences. One need look no further than the work of Nikolas Rose and Joelle M. Abi-Rached, scholars who argue in their striking volume Neuro: The New Brain Sciences and Management of the Mind that governing in the future will occur through the brain.[i] While for contemporary neuroscientists and neurologists such an expansion of a-disciplinary neuroscience might and…
 
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    Ethnography.com

  • Anthropological Fieldwork by Daiva Repeckaite

    Tony
    25 Aug 2014 | 2:03 pm
    by Daiva Repečkaitė Fieldwork-byDR1
  • Privilege, Honor, and Meetings

    Tony
    8 Jun 2014 | 5:31 am
      Cheese Squares, Olives, and Power without Responsibility. Gentry, Blue Blood, and Privilege. Max Weber’s ideas about Honoratioren, Voting Cows, and Power. Meetings are rituals, and rituals need symbols, and decorations. I’ve been to a lot of meetings in my time as an academic where I sat bored and confused, but still fulfilled my function as a decoration, and clap on cue. And to a large extent, that is what such ritual is about: clapping on cue about that to which you are brain dead. The most obvious place I am such a decoration is in May graduation ceremonies. I march into a…
  • Nicholas Wade, Jared Diamond and Anthropology

    Tony
    7 May 2014 | 8:28 pm
         Ok, Anthropology, one day after my post on Nicholas Wade, and that post gets more hits than the last five or six posts here put together.  I get it, you like Nicholas Wade, and especially complaining about him.  You don’t like biological reductionism, and think that such studies are used to reinforce racist ideologies.  For what it is worth, I more or less agree. But for some reason you don’t want to read stuff that critiques biological reductionism on its own terms, and opt for those presented by the anthropology’s favorite bogeymen, which from recent activity in the…
  • Nicholas Wade Writes Again—And Again Anthropology Pays Attention

    Tony
    6 May 2014 | 8:28 pm
    Nicholas Wade has a new book out, and the Anthropologists are sharpening their indignation—complaining because he treads on their private territory.  Sorry, anthro, you are not medicine or law, and do not have a monopoly over who practices what you preach.  Let it go.  Sometimes I think that the entire discipline is beset by a big-time inferiority complex The solution?  Simply do good anthropology, and more importantly, promote good anthropology.  That might mean assigning Nigel Barley’s The Innocent Anthropologist, Jonathan Marks book What it Means to be 98% Chimpanzee, Carol…
  • Mirror Neurons and the Looking Glass Self: The Neural Sciences meet Sociology

    Tony
    30 Apr 2014 | 8:15 pm
      Why do neural scientists need expensive MRI machines to “see” what classical sociologists Charles Horton Cooley and George Herbert Mead saw by simply looking into the eyes of children?  This is the subject of my recent article “Of Mirror Neurons and the Looking Glass Self” published in Perspectives on Science The Mirror Neuron is a hot thing today in the neural sciences.  The Mirror Neuron hypothesis postulates that a person watching another person do something, imagines that the other person is doing.  How do the neural scientists know this?  Because they can watch it on…
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    Visual Anthropology of Japan - 日本映像人類学

  • "Aichi Prefectural Museum of Art forced to cover up 'obscene' photos following complaint"

    27 Aug 2014 | 10:30 pm
    Image borrowed from Twitter (@asaitakashi) via Japan Today, 8/27/14.Story from Japan Today, 8/27/14: When police arrested Japanese artist Rokudenashiko last month for distributing 3-D printer plans for models of her vagina, the world was at once baffled and outraged. But despite all the fuss that was raised over the artist’s arrest, it looks like the Japanese police are at it again, this time targeting the Aichi Prefectural Museum of Art for an exhibition featuring nude photography by the Japanese photographer Ryudai Takano. Though no one has been arrested, the museum made headlines after…
  • “Stop! AIDS” campaign event - Porn queens to take part in 24-hour 'squeeze-a-thon'

    26 Aug 2014 | 5:17 pm
    From Japan Today, 8/27/14: A group of Japanese porn actresses are preparing to have their breasts squeezed by fans for 24 hours this weekend for a charity event loosely translated as “Boob Aid”. The nine adult movie stars told local media on Monday they could barely contain their excitement about the “Stop! AIDS” campaign event—which will be televised live—but asked, perhaps somewhat optimistically: please be gentle. “I’m really looking forward to lots of people fondling my boobs,” Rina Serina told the Tokyo Sports newspaper. “But I would be very happy if you would please…
  • Update: "Monkeys, ghosts and gods 'cannot own copyright' says US"

    25 Aug 2014 | 1:03 am
    From The Telegraph, 8/21/14: In the wake of controversy over Wikipedia’s free and worldwide distribution of a monkey ‘selfie’ against the wishes of the man who claims to own copyright, the US has issued new guidance that says monkeys, ghosts and gods are all banned from possessing image rights. The US Copyright Office has published a draft update to its rules regarding ownership of creative works like photographs, text and art – the first changes in more than two decades – which explicitly state that it will only recognise pieces produced by a human. Among the 1,222 pages of updated…
  • Local Matsuri, 2014 Edition

    16 Aug 2014 | 11:54 pm
    Despite periods of heavy rain and the usual hot/humid weather, the local summer festival was able to take place. Here are this year's offerings... See last year's festival: Visual Anthropology of Japan, Local Matsuri I: The Mikoshi, posted July 30, 2013. Visual Anthropology of Japan, Local Matsuri II: Evening Activities, posted July 31, 2013. Visual Anthropology of Japan, Local Matsuri III: Tamago Senbei, posted August 1, 2013. Visual Anthropology of Japan, Local Matsuri IV: People, posted August 2, 2013. Visual Anthropology of Japan, Local Matsuri V: くわしく, posted August 3, 2013.
  • Semi-sounds = Japanese Summer

    12 Aug 2014 | 12:31 am
    If you play the above video before reading this text you might wonder what the point is: not much action other than a few bugs (yes, they are bugs, not birds) flying about, an occasional bicyclist passes by... But here the image/visual is not so important - it is the sound. Watch/listen to the video again with the volume turned up to the highest setting and you will begin to get an idea of the summer sounds of cicada (semi, セミ in Japanese). Yes, those large, fluttering creatures in the video are cicadas. The semi-sound is constant and loud of the Japanese summer. Here is a brief…
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    International Cognition and Culture Institute

  • Call for posters: Reciprocity and Social Cognition

    25 Aug 2014 | 11:48 am
    The Berlin School of Mind and Brain organizes a symposium on "Reciprocity and Social Cognition", from the 23rd to the 25th of March, 2015. Keynote speakers will be Richard Moran, Julia Fischer and Natalie Sebanz (Cognitive Science, CEU Budapest). The deadline to submit a poster is the first of October. Complete call below the fold.
  • Has a decimal point error misled millions into believing that spinach is a good source of iron?

    6 Aug 2014 | 10:05 am
    A great cultural epidemiology story by Ole Bjørn RekdalAcademic urban legends,"  in  Social Studies of Science (2014, 44(4)) freely available here Abstract: Many of the messages presented in respectable scientific publications are, in fact, based on various forms of rumors. Some of these rumors appear so frequently, and in such complex, colorful, and entertaining ways that we can think of them as academic urban legends. The explanation for this phenomenon is usually that authors have lazily, sloppily, or fraudulently employed sources, and peer reviewers and editors…
  • Random choice among the Kantu, swidden agriculturalists of Kalimantan

    19 Jul 2014 | 8:32 am
    An excellent post by Michael Schulson at Aeon magazine entitled "How to choose? When your reasons are worse than useless, sometimes the most rational choice is a random stab in the dark," showing, among other things, how rationality and expectations of rationality can clash."In the 1970s, a young American anthropologist named Michael Dove set out for Indonesia, intending to solve an ethnographic mystery. Then a graduate student at Stanford, Dove had been reading about the Kantu’, a group of subsistence farmers who live in the tropical forests of Borneo. The Kantu’…
  • Alberto Acerbi on cultural evolution

    18 Jun 2014 | 1:49 am
    Alberto Acerbi's excellent blog hosts a noteworthy discussion of Claidière, Scott-Phillips and Sperber's recent PTRS paper on cultural attraction. Alex Mesoudi, Thom Scott-Phillips and Dan Speber joined the discussion; Alberto concluded it.
  • Babies' and birds' causal understanding

    15 Jun 2014 | 3:37 am
    A very interesting comparison between crows and humans in a new (free access) paper in Proceedings of the Royal Society B entitled "Of babies and birds: complex tool behaviours are not sufficient for the evolution of the ability to create a novel causal ntervention" by Alex H. Taylor, Lucy G. Cheke, Anna Waismeyer, Andrew N. Meltzoff, Rachael Miller, Alison Gopnik, Nicola S. Clayton, and Russell D. Gray. Abstract: Humans are capable of simply observing a correlation between cause and effect, and then producing a novel behavioural pattern in order to recreate…
 
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    Glossographia

  • Anthro X: An anti-seminar in culture and cognition

    schrisomalis
    1 Sep 2014 | 8:18 am
    As mentioned in my previous post, this term I’m running a special course on the topic of culture and cognition, for six of the students in my Culture, Language and Cognition course from last term, all of whom were highly successful and, because I’m advising them in one way or another, are highly motivated to do some more work in this field.    I’m running this as a joint directed study – it looks like a seminar, and acts like a seminar, but keeping it ‘directed’ allows me to schedule it and manage enrollment more effectively.   I’m calling it…
  • Another summer gone

    schrisomalis
    27 Aug 2014 | 8:26 pm
    All lies.  The promises I made to myself that I’d post here even while I was doing my fieldwork: all the products of a self-deluded mind.  Is this what happens when you get tenure?  Who knew? In any event, yes, I’m still alive, and yes, as alluded above, I now have tenure and can spend the next 30 years ranting about ‘kids these days’ or whatever I choose, but no, I haven’t been around much online – although I have been spending some time on Twitter schrisomalis.  But enough wallowing.  No time for wallowing. Once again I’ll be teaching my…
  • Jim Lambek, 1922-2014

    schrisomalis
    24 Jun 2014 | 9:11 pm
    I learned the sad news today that the mathematician Joachim Lambek (Jim to all of us who knew him) passed away yesterday at the age of 91.    Jim was one of my mentors and an external committee member for my Ph.D.     Jim will be known to mathematicians (of whom I suppose relatively few if any will read this blog) for his many articles in formal subjects far beyond my knowledge or ability, but also as a warm and generous scholar. I came to him in a rather roundabout way; in discussions with my advisor, Bruce Trigger, he suggested to me that if I really wanted to do this numbers thing,…
  • A new look

    schrisomalis
    14 May 2014 | 10:20 am
    As you will see (at least, if you view the site on the WordPress page as opposed to on an aggregator or somewhere else), I have changed the theme and layout for the site.   Hope you like it – any theme is going to have its advantages and disadvantages.   Frankly I was getting annoyed at the small text size and plainness of the old theme, which had been around since the blog’s inception in 2008.  This one has larger text and is more modern, and the main headings are larger and clearer (now at the left sidebar).    Comments and criticisms are welcome, bearing in mind that…
  • XLent LInguistics

    schrisomalis
    5 May 2014 | 6:50 am
    As was correctly answered in the comments to the previous post, I am now 40 years old (XL) and the next time that my age in Roman numerals will be the same length as my age in Western (Hindu-Arabic) numerals will be when I am 51 (LI).    49 is not a correct answer in this case because the Romans did not habitually use subtraction in this way; irregular formations like IL (49) and XM (1900) do sometimes occur irregularly, but normally one cannot ‘skip’ a power.  I can only be subtracted from V and X; X can only be subtracted from L and C; and C can only be subtracted from D and…
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    media/anthropology

  • The long-term impact of the new protest movements

    John Postill
    24 Aug 2014 | 8:48 am
    In early 2011, the Spanish blog entrepreneur Julio Alonso joined other netizens in switching his attention from internet issues to his country’s profound economic and political crisis. The story below recounts this transition as well as giving us Alonso’s particular take on the indignados (15M) movement, shaped by his technological expertise. It is translated and adapted from an interview by Stéphane Grueso that took place in Madrid towards the end of 2011. This is the fifth instalment in my freedom technologists series. The full interview is available on YouTube via…
  • The five modes of self-tracking

    John Postill
    7 Aug 2014 | 10:08 pm
    John Postill:By Deborah Lupton Originally posted on This Sociological Life: Recently I have been working on a conference paper that seeks to outline the five different modes of self-tracking that I have identified as currently in existence. I argue that there is evidence that the personal data that are derived from individuals engaging in reflexive self-monitoring are now beginning to be used by agencies and organisations beyond the personal and privatised realm. Self-tracking rationales and sites are proliferating as part of a ‘function creep’ of the technology and ethos of…
  • We don’t know how to participate

    John Postill
    6 Aug 2014 | 5:05 am
    In this fourth episode of the freedom technologists series we hear from Margarita Padilla, another IT specialist active in Spain’s civil society, most recently in the indignados (or 15M) movement. The story below is once again translated and adapted from an interview by Stéphane Grueso that took place in Madrid in December 2011 (see my earlier post on Daniel Vázquez). The  interview is freely available on YouTube (in Spanish). In future posts I will share some anthropological reflections on this and other personal narratives of the 15M movement. My name is Margarita Padilla. I am a…
  • How Spain’s indignados movement was born

    John Postill
    1 Aug 2014 | 5:31 am
    In this third instalment of the freedom technologists series we hear the extraordinary story of the IT specialist Daniel Vázquez, one of the original occupiers of Puerta del Sol square, in Madrid, where Spain’s indignados (or 15M) movement was born in May 2011. On the first night of the occupation, Daniel set up the soon-to-be influential Twitter account @acampadasol. The story below is based on a long interview he gave to a fellow indignado, the documentary filmmaker Stéphane Grueso (@fanetin), who we met in the previous post. The two-part interview (in Spanish with English…
  • Freedom technologists and their practices

    John Postill
    24 Jul 2014 | 9:54 am
    This is the second in a series of 42 blog posts devoted to exploring the connection between freedom technologists and the new protest movements. See the first post here, the next post here, the whole series as a document or as blog posts. In the first post of this series I defined freedom technologists as citizens who like to mix their techs with their politics, often as part of a popular protest or uprising. Some freedom technologists are techies, others are not, yet they all share a strong interest in the potential uses of new digital technologies for political change and social…
 
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    Neuroanthropology

  • Anth 207: new open education space – update!

    gregdowney
    22 Aug 2014 | 5:34 am
    If you follow Neuroanthropology, either here or on Facebook, you may have noticed something new. We’ve had a bit of a facelift to this site and added a page: Anth 207 Neuroanth 101. This new venture is an effort to generate open educational resources for people interested in psychological anthropology: students, teachers, researchers, the curious… The first video for Anth 207  Neuroanth 101 is already posted: WEIRD psychology. We’ll be adding more videos slowly, as well as suggested readings, other related resources, reflection questions, and notes. The goal is to start…
  • Almost Here! The Encultured Brain: An Introduction to Neuroanthropology

    dlende
    20 Aug 2012 | 5:22 am
    It started on this blog. In 2007, Greg and I co-founded Neuroanthropology. Five years later our book is out! “The Encultured Brain” will be published by MIT Press this Friday, August 24th, 2012. You can already order itat Amazon! The brain and the nervous system are our most cultural organs. Our nervous system is especially immature at birth, our brain disproportionately small in relation to its adult size and open to cultural sculpting at multiple levels. Recognizing this, the new field of neuroanthropology places the brain at the center of discussions about human nature and…
  • Neuroanthropology Now on Facebook

    dlende
    4 Aug 2012 | 7:54 am
    Neuroanthropology now comes in two forms on Facebook! The Blog – With Extra Content If you want to follow everything that we’re doing on the Neuroanthropology PLOS blog, and you also want short, fun posts that Greg and I have specifically written for Facebook, then head over to the Neuroanthropology Blog Facebook Page. I just stuck the great photo featured here up on Facebook – just a sample! Neuroanthropology Interest Group An active interest group – with lots of shared links and discussion – is growing quickly on Facebook. Here you can share and discover news…
  • Neuroanthropology on PLoS – Best of 2011

    dlende
    17 Jan 2012 | 1:47 pm
    The last year was a great one for us over at Neuroanthropology’s new home on the Public Library of Science – our first full year as part of PLoS Blogs, a lot of great writing, and a vivid sense that anthropology online is developing into a robust arena. Here is a quick run-down of the most read 2011 posts by Greg and by Daniel, as well as a selection of other notable posts. Greg – Top Five ‘The last free people on the planet’ *Greg’s comprehensive take on media hype over “uncontacted” Indian tribes, and how these groups truly challenge those of us living in…
  • Neuroanthropology.net at 1,000,000

    dlende
    20 Dec 2010 | 6:29 pm
    Neuroanthropology.net just broke through the 1,000,000 visits mark! We’ve done that in three years. Our very post came in December 2007. Even though Greg and I have moved over to Neuroanthropology PLoS, this site has continued to generate impressive traffic since September 1st. Here are some of the posts that got us over the top: We agree it’s WEIRD, but is it WEIRD enough? -Greg dissects the excellent study by Henrich et al. that took psychologists to task for basing claims about universal psychology using samples of college students Inside the Mind of a Pedophile -Absolutely incredible…
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    BOAS Network

  • Latest Fossil Finds Make Puzzle of Human Evol. Harder to Solve

    BOAS
    21 Aug 2014 | 10:56 am
    The latest molecular analyses and fossil finds suggest that the story of human evolution is far more complex—and more interesting—than anyone imagined By Bernard Wood So what do you think?” said Lee Berger. He had just opened the lids of two big wooden boxes, each containing the carefully laid out fossilized bones of a humanlike skeleton from Malapa, South Africa. These two individuals, who had drawn their last breath two million years ago, had created quite a stir. Most fossils are “isolated” finds—a jawbone here, a foot bone there. Scientists then have to figure out whether the…
  • Meet anthropologist Dr. Laurie Kauffman

    BOAS
    31 Jul 2014 | 2:09 pm
    Meet anthropologist Dr. Laurie Kauffman of Oklahoma City University! Here she discusses her work with squirrel monkeys in Costa Rica.
  • Meet Anthropologist Dr. Kerry M. Dore

    BOAS
    25 Jul 2014 | 9:39 am
    Meet anthropologist Dr. Kerry M. Dore! Here she discusses her work with vervet monkeys in St. Kitts. Vervet monkeys are not native to the island but have thrived in the lush landscape. As a result, their relationship with humans on the island is strained. Dr. Dore discusses options to help improve the monkey/human relationship. Check out more videos at www.boasnetwork.com
  • A Flower in the Mouth

    Jason Gardner
    24 Jul 2014 | 6:04 pm
    A Flower in the Mouth is a book by award-winning photographer Jason Gardner, showing the culture, music and rituals of the authentic, folkloric Carnaval festival in Pernambuco, Brazil. The 128pp book contains color and black & white images and interviews of the people shaping this dynamic culture, as well as writing from Jason’s experiences.  For more information and to purchase the book, go to http://www.jasongardner.net/shop/afitm The book also features a 9 track audio compilation, a download with music from the region. Image gallery here: http://www.jasongardner.net/afitm
  • Imperiled Amazon Indians Make 1st Contact with Outsiders

    BOAS
    10 Jul 2014 | 1:08 pm
    By Megan Gannon, News Editor | July 03, 2014 12:27pm ET Report Retrieved from Live Science Indigenous people with no prior contact to the outside world have just emerged from the Amazon rainforest in Brazil and made contact with a group of settled Indians, after being spotted migrating to evade illegal loggers, advocates say. The news, which was released July 2, comes after sightings of the uncontacted Indians in Brazil near the border with Peru, according to the group Survival International. Officials with the organization had warned last month that the isolated tribes face threats of…
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