Anthropology

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  • Anthropology Deciphers the Ebola Crisis

    Anthropology.net
    nataliamagnani
    30 Oct 2014 | 6:05 am
    To the world outside that of the victims, The Ebola crisis is one of hazmat suits and anonymous bodies. However, emerging along with the voices of doctors are those of medical anthropologists, who ask for an interior perspective in dealing with the epidemic. West African countries are truly suffering, particularly those of Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Guinea. According to anthropologist Adia Benton, in an article by Providence Journal, numbers are most likely much higher than reported. Along with hospital counts are those bodies too weak to ever make it to a hospital and into statistics books.
  • Anthropology Unveils clues about Roman gladiators’ eating habits HeritageDaily – Heritage & Archaeology News

    Delicious/tag/anthropology
    30 Oct 2014 | 6:10 am
  • Diet, society, and economy in late medieval Spain: Stable isotope evidence from Muslims and Christians from Gandía, Valencia

    American Journal of Physical Anthropology
    Michelle M. Alexander, Christopher M. Gerrard, Alejandra Gutiérrez, Andrew R. Millard
    28 Oct 2014 | 10:18 pm
    ABSTRACT This article investigates the diets of neighboring Christians and Muslims in late medieval Spain (here 13th–16th centuries) through the analysis of the stable isotopes of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) in adult human and animal bone collagen. Twenty-four Christians and 20 Muslims are sampled from two adjacent and contemporaneous settlements in the township of Gandía on the Mediterranean coast, together with the remains of 24 animals. Statistical differences in both δ13C and δ15N reveal that the diets of the two faith communities differed, despite living side-by-side. These…
  • Writing Anti-Racism

    Savage Minds
    Carole McGranahan
    27 Oct 2014 | 6:28 am
    This entry is part 9 of 9 in the Fall 2014 Writer’s Workshop series.(Savage Minds is pleased to post this essay by guest author Ghassan Hage as part of our Writer’s Workshop series. Ghassan is the Future Generation Professor of Anthropology and Social Theory at the University of Melbourne. He is author of numerous books include White Nation: Fantasies of White Supremacy in a Multicultural Society (Heibonsha Publishers, 2003), Against Paranoid Nationalism: Searching for Hope in a Shrinking Society (Pluto Press, 2006), Waiting (Melbourne University Press, 2009), and with Robyn Eckersley,…
  • A New Android Who "Can Do Japanese Sign Language"

    Visual Anthropology of Japan - 日本映像人類学
    8 Oct 2014 | 10:19 pm
    Accompanying text: Toshiba has developed a lifelike communication android that can move its arms and hands smoothly and use Japanese sign language. The android is a prototype that the company will continue to develop towards achieving a service robot able to assist people in the fields of welfare and healthcare. The android will be showcased at CEATEC JAPAN 2014, which will be held from October 7 to 11.Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=izH08FB2mxULifelike? Smoothly? Use Japanese Sign Language? Really? (The JSL is horrible, barely understandable...) Despite not having a face, ASIMO's sign…
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    anthropology - Yahoo News Search Results

  • Days of sparkling talks, shopping.

    30 Oct 2014 | 12:23 am
    Jewelry lovers might want to make time this weekend to visit the University of Pennsylvania's Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.
  • Anthropology exposes how miners shape our world and our views of it

    29 Oct 2014 | 8:50 pm
    Miners do much more than extract minerals and make profits. All over the world mining corporations are collaborating with governments, local populations and NGOs. Their logos, mottoes and CEOs seem to pervade the news media, including the social sections.
  • Mexico archaeologists explore Teotihuacan tunnel

    29 Oct 2014 | 4:46 pm
    A yearslong exploration of a tunnel sealed almost 2,000 years ago at the ancient city of Teotihuacan yielded thousands of relics and the discovery of three chambers that could hold more important finds, Mexican...
  • The Secret Life of Anthropology 1130

    27 Oct 2014 | 2:23 pm
    If you’ve ever wandered through the Yard on Thursday afternoons, you’ve probably wondered why a bunch of Harvard students are out in front of Matthews digging away at a giant hole in the scorching sun gross misty rain.
  • Anthropology professors boycott Israeli academic institutions

    26 Oct 2014 | 10:01 pm
    More than 650 anthropologists — including University Anthropology Prof. Richard Handler — are responding to a call by many Palestinian civil society organizations to boycott academic institutions affiliated with Israel.
 
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    Anthropology.net

  • Anthropology Deciphers the Ebola Crisis

    nataliamagnani
    30 Oct 2014 | 6:05 am
    To the world outside that of the victims, The Ebola crisis is one of hazmat suits and anonymous bodies. However, emerging along with the voices of doctors are those of medical anthropologists, who ask for an interior perspective in dealing with the epidemic. West African countries are truly suffering, particularly those of Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Guinea. According to anthropologist Adia Benton, in an article by Providence Journal, numbers are most likely much higher than reported. Along with hospital counts are those bodies too weak to ever make it to a hospital and into statistics books.
  • The Lives Behind Plant Documents

    nataliamagnani
    10 Oct 2014 | 1:42 pm
    In the county of Uasin Gishu, Kenya, a recent article in Ethnobotany Research and Applications, local plants have many uses for fodder, medicine, food, and building material, but today this knowledge is threatened by increased pressures on the land. While the list of plants and their uses provides valuable basic knowledge, the article heightened my interest in a completely different realm of inquiry. Medicinal plants in particular have very social, dynamic lives, from their administration by healers or healthcare personnel, to the everyday person collecting for personal health needs, to the…
  • 39,000 Year Old Cave Art from Sulawesi, Indonesia

    Kambiz Kamrani
    8 Oct 2014 | 6:28 pm
    Photo by Kinez Riza This hand stencil was discovered in one of the caves of the Maros region of the island, Sulawesi in the 1950s. A paper published in Nature now describes the dating of the sediment on top of the stencil, which makes it more than 39,000 years old and now the oldest painting in the world. Adjacent to this stencil a painting of a babirusa or pig-deer which is 35,400 years old, which makes it among the earliest figurative depictions. The oldest dated hand stencil in the world (upper right) and possibly the oldest figurative depiction in cave art—a female babirusa (a hoglike…
  • Marie’s Dictionary

    Kambiz Kamrani
    27 Sep 2014 | 5:30 pm
    This short documentary tells the story of Marie Wilcox, the last fluent speaker of the Wukchumni language and the dictionary she created in an effort to keep her language alive.Filed under: Linguistic Anthropology Tagged: Endangered language, Linguistic Anthropology, linguistics, Marie Wilcox, Wukchumni
  • Lions, and Tigers, and Mushrooms?

    nataliamagnani
    22 Sep 2014 | 11:35 am
    In a new article from the Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnopharmacology, researchers in Chihuahua, Mexico discuss the selective use of mushrooms in Sierra Madre. The municipalities of Bocoyna and Urique are the only areas in Northern Mexico where residents pick mushrooms, but even then only five of over 20 edible species make the list. Attitudes toward our fungi prey vary across cultures, beckoning a reexamination of that seemingly ubiquitous fear. I was born in Russia, a land of mycrophiles, before moving to America, the land of mycrophobes. My mother once found a cornucopia of Boletus…
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    Savage Minds

  • “This brings me to another thing: the danger of kissing on the mouth”

    Matt Thompson
    30 Oct 2014 | 6:50 am
    This semester I am at the College of William and Mary completing a practicum in archives and special collections primarily focused on digitization, the whole point of which is to make items such as manuscripts accessible to users online. As is the nature of special collections the material is one of a kind and that means along the way I occasionally find treasures that catch my eye through the blur of metadata creation. I’ve already shared with you the pleasures of huffing nitrous oxide at Yale College in 1821 and today I have a new one, the dangers of letting people kiss your baby. My…
  • #HanyangTowson

    mdurington
    30 Oct 2014 | 6:24 am
    Networking Media Anthropology Samuel Collins is teaching a seminar at Hanyang University (ERICA campus) as part of his Fulbright grant in South Korea and, as luck would have it, Matthew Durington is doing the same in Baltimore. The two of them resolved to network their courses together using some of the principles they espouse in Networked Anthropology (Routledge, 2014), combined with some new directions for their research. Among other challenges? The 1 day + 13 hour time difference. #HanyangTowson It’s hard to find 2 cities more different than Seoul and Baltimore. Baltimore is a tertiary…
  • Writing Anti-Racism

    Carole McGranahan
    27 Oct 2014 | 6:28 am
    This entry is part 9 of 9 in the Fall 2014 Writer’s Workshop series.(Savage Minds is pleased to post this essay by guest author Ghassan Hage as part of our Writer’s Workshop series. Ghassan is the Future Generation Professor of Anthropology and Social Theory at the University of Melbourne. He is author of numerous books include White Nation: Fantasies of White Supremacy in a Multicultural Society (Heibonsha Publishers, 2003), Against Paranoid Nationalism: Searching for Hope in a Shrinking Society (Pluto Press, 2006), Waiting (Melbourne University Press, 2009), and with Robyn Eckersley,…
  • Strategy of Condescension

    Kerim
    24 Oct 2014 | 3:46 am
    中文翻譯 Chinese translation That Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg gave an interview in Chinese was big news this week. You can see the start of the interview here: As you can hear, Zuckerberg’s performance was greeted with “repeated cheers and applause by the assembled students and faculty members.” I don’t want to pick apart Zuckerberg’s Chinese – he only started learning a few years ago, but still did better than some people I know who have lived in Taiwan for over a decade. Nor do I want to focus on the mixed reactions he got on the internet later on.
  • Academic life is a trapeze, and librarians are the safety net: SM is now archived

    Rex
    24 Oct 2014 | 12:07 am
    This open access day I wanted to officially announce some good news — Savage Minds is now being archived at the University of Texas at Austin. Thanks to the initiative of Pat Galloway and her students Brian Douglass, Kathleen O’Connell, Josephine Ragolia, and Rachel Winston, an archive of our blog now lives on UT Austin’s Dspace install. (Update: I TOTALLY forgot to give Kerim credit for the incredible amount of work he did communicating with the UT Austin crowd to get the archive set up. In fact, he does ridiculous amounts of work on the back end of the blog all the time…
 
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    Anthropology News -- ScienceDaily

  • Seeing dinosaur feathers in a new light

    30 Oct 2014 | 7:07 am
    Why were dinosaurs covered in a cloak of feathers long before the early bird species Archaeopteryx first attempted flight? Researchers postulate that these ancient reptiles had a highly developed ability to discern color. Their hypothesis: The evolution of feathers made dinosaurs more colorful, which in turn had a profoundly positive impact on communication, the selection of mates and on dinosaurs’ procreation.
  • How culture influences violence among the Amazon's ‘fierce people'

    27 Oct 2014 | 3:19 pm
    When Yanomamö men in the Amazon raided villages and killed decades ago, they formed alliances with men in other villages rather than just with close kin like chimpanzees do. And the spoils of war came from marrying their allies’ sisters and daughters, rather than taking their victims’ land and women.
  • Ebola's evolutionary roots more ancient than previously thought

    24 Oct 2014 | 7:12 am
    A new study is helping to rewrite Ebola’s family history. It shows that Ebola and Marburg are each members of ancient evolutionary lines, and that these two viruses last shared a common ancestor sometime prior to 16-23 million years ago.
  • Ancient Europeans intolerant to lactose for 5,000 years after they adopted agriculture

    21 Oct 2014 | 9:59 am
    By analyzing DNA from petrous bones of ancient Europeans, scientists have identified these peoples remained intolerant to lactose (natural sugar in the milk of mammals) for 5,000 years after they adopted agricultural practices. The scientific team examined nuclear ancient DNA extracted from thirteen individuals from burials from archaeological sites in the Great Hungarian Plain. The skeletons sampled date from 5,700 BC (Early Neolithic) to 800 BC (Iron Age).
  • Mummy remains refute antiquity of ankylosing spondylitis

    20 Oct 2014 | 6:00 am
    Ankylosing spondylitis is a systemic disease that causes inflammation in the spinal joints and was thought to have affected members of the ancient Egyptian royal families. Now a new study refutes that claim, finding instead a degenerative spinal condition called diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) in royal Egyptian mummies from the 18th to early 20th Dynasties.
 
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    Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog

  • Long live the 28th October 1940

    Dienekes
    27 Oct 2014 | 8:14 pm
  • High coverage genome from 45,000-year old Siberian (Ust'-Ishim)

    Dienekes
    22 Oct 2014 | 12:14 pm
    This is the oldest full genome of a modern human published to date and it also comes from a time (45 thousand years ago) that coincides with the Upper Paleolithic revolution in Eurasia.45 thousand years ago is probably close to when Eurasians started diverging from each other as they spread in all directions. So, we expect that a human from that time would be "undifferentiated Eurasian" and indeed this seems to be the case.First the Y-chromosome:The Y chromosome sequence of the Ust’-Ishim individual is similarly inferred to be ancestral to a group of related Y chromosomes (haplogroup…
  • Ancient DNA from prehistoric inhabitants of Hungary

    Dienekes
    21 Oct 2014 | 8:50 am
    A very interesting new article on Europe describes new data from ancient Hungary from the Neolithic to the Iron Age. It is open access, so go ahead and read it. I will update this entry with some comments after I read the paper myself.UPDATE I (The petrous bone):The authors write:The endogenous DNA yields from the petrous samples exceeded those from the teeth by 4- to 16-fold and those from other bones up to 183-fold. Thus, while other skeletal elements yielded human, non-clonal DNA contents ranging from 0.3 to 20.7%, the levels for petrous bones ranged from 37.4 to 85.4% (Fig. 1).This seems…
  • Ancestry Composition preprint

    Dienekes
    19 Oct 2014 | 11:16 pm
    This is one of the main ancestry tools of 23andMe so it is nice to see its methodology described in detail. bioRxiv http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/010512 Ancestry Composition: A Novel, Efficient Pipeline for Ancestry Deconvolution Eric Y Durand et al. Ancestry deconvolution, the task of identifying the ancestral origin of chromosomal segments in admixed individuals, has important implications, from mapping disease genes to identifying candidate loci under natural selection. To date, however, most existing methods for ancestry deconvolution are typically limited to two or three ancestral…
  • Tomb II at Vergina belonged to Philip II and a possible Scythian wife

    Dienekes
    10 Oct 2014 | 1:13 pm
    Remains of Alexander the Great's Father Confirmed FoundA team of Greek researchers has confirmed that bones found in a two-chambered royal tomb at Vergina, a town some 100 miles away from Amphipolis's mysterious burial mound, indeed belong to the Macedonian King Philip II, Alexander the Great's father. The anthropological investigation examined 350 bones and fragments found in two larnakes, or caskets, of the tomb. It uncovered pathologies, activity markers and trauma that helped identify the tomb's occupants. Along with the cremated remains of Philip II, the burial, commonly known as…
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    ZERO ANTHROPOLOGY

  • Useful Atrocities

    Eva Bartlett
    26 Oct 2014 | 7:07 am
    Who outside of Syria knows the names Yara Abbas, Maya Naser, Mohamed al-Saeed…? The corporate media has inundated us with news of the two American journalists allegedly beheaded, the first of whose execution video has been deemed faked. But what of the non-Western journalists and civilians beheaded and murdered by ISIS, al-Nusra, and associated terrorists in Syria, Iraq, Lebanon, Palestine? Why didn’t the August 2012 execution (which some reported as a beheading) of TV presenter Mohamed al-Saeed, claimed by the Nusra gang, create the same outrage? Or the December 2013 kidnapping and…
  • About Those Good Intentions

    Maximilian Forte
    11 Oct 2014 | 2:52 pm
    The following, the final in our series of extracts, comes from my chapter, “Imperial Abduction Lore and Humanitarian Seduction,” which serves as the introduction to Good Intentions: Norms and Practices of Imperial Humanitarianism (Montreal: Alert Press, 2014), pp. 1-34. This section was primarily addressed to students as readers, and any constructive feedback would be appreciated. There are many valid and unimpeachable reasons why students might be considering humanitarian work and/or working for a NGO. There is no gainsaying that many students have genuine, sincere, and heartfelt reasons…
  • Realism or Iconography? The Pentagon’s Implicit Theory of Visual Representation

    Maximilian Forte
    10 Oct 2014 | 6:13 pm
    The following is an extract from my chapter, “A Flickr of Militarization: Photographic Regulation, Symbolic Consecration, and the Strategic Communication of ‘Good Intentions’,” published in Good Intentions: Norms and Practices of Imperial Humanitarianism (Montreal: Alert Press, 2014), pp. 185-279: US military documents make it quite clear that, for the military, a photograph is a straightforward, truthful, and impartial record of reality as it appeared in front of the camera. However, at the same time these documents suggest that some images might be used as “enemy propaganda”…
  • Road to Victory: Syria’s Zenobians Stand to Win International Rugby Tournament

    Eva Bartlett
    2 Oct 2014 | 1:56 pm
    photo by Eva Bartlett By Eva Bartlett While I don’t follow organized sports, when I got the opportunity to meet the only rugby team in Syria and see them practise, I jumped on it.  I found the fact that these men still meet, train and compete–in spite of the many obstacles which should prevent them from doing so–fascinating. What follows are observations and conversations from a morning with Syria’s Zenobians: Already by 10 am on a blistering June Friday, heat rises in shimmers across the small multi-purpose pitch at Faihaa stadium. At one end, members of the…
  • The US Military as Great Chief, Father, Doctor, and Babysitter

    Maximilian Forte
    1 Oct 2014 | 5:39 pm
    The following is an extract from my chapter, “A Flickr of Militarization: Photographic Regulation, Symbolic Consecration, and the Strategic Communication of ‘Good Intentions’,” published in Good Intentions: Norms and Practices of Imperial Humanitarianism (Montreal: Alert Press, 2014), pp. 185-279: In 2009 the Department of the Army produced a field manual titled, “Visual Information Operations” (US Army, 2009a). One of the significant features of this manual is that it provides a clear set of categories of photographs to be produced that are intended to positively showcase US…
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    Material World

  • Changes afoot at Material World Blog

    Haidy Geismar
    31 Oct 2014 | 3:08 am
    Haidy Geismar, UCL Some of you more regular readers may have noticed that we’ve been posting less at material world blog of late. When Danny Miller and I started the blog in 2006 the blog was a way for me to keep my connection to the vibrant material culture group in the Anthropology Department at UCL where I had been a doctoral student as well as to connect UCL to the broader interest in material culture developing in the US. Since 2006 we have had a series of dedicated editors and editors-at-large, based all over the place, who have regularly provided content ranging from exhibition…
  • Civilisation, Infrastructure and the City

    Haidy Geismar
    29 Oct 2014 | 9:14 am
    Friday 7th Nov, 9:45-15:00 UCL Taviton 433, 16 Taviton Street, London WC1H 0BW civcity.wordpress.com/ The world is concurrently urbanising and digitising, and both phenomena are routinely admitted amongst the most important drivers of change in the 21st century. Yet, how do processes of urbanisation and digitisation affect the creation and perpetuation of everyday local culture? Are they mechanical drivers which deterministically imprint themselves on society or is the question of their efficacy a more complicated matter?  This one-day workshop will explore these questions, contextualising…
  • Cultures of Mending: A collaborative workshop

    Haidy Geismar
    27 Oct 2014 | 9:14 am
    Mending is a multifaceted practice.  It has long-established roots spanning centuries of human productive effort.  Today it is experiencing a revival as a result of grassroots innovation movements and initiatives which seek to foster repair, re-use, upcycling and other creative forms of waste prevention. Whilst it may be argued that mending practices never went away for some (Bond et al. 2013; Hackney 2013), in recent decades they have largely been marginalised by more spectacular and conspicuous forms of contemporary consumption, leisure and/or domestic practice, as well as the widespread…
  • Call for Papers: Photography in Print

    Haidy Geismar
    15 Oct 2014 | 7:23 am
    Via Prof. Elizabeth Edwards, De Montfort University 22-23 JUNE 2015 Photographic History Research Centre De Montfort University, Leicester, UK The 2015 PHRC Annual International Conference will address the complex and wide range question of ‘photography in print.’ The conference aims to explore the functions, affects and dynamics of photographs on the printed page. Many of the engagements with photographs, both influential and banal, are through print, whether in newspapers, books, magazines or advertising. We would like to consider what are the practices of production and consumption?
  • Museums at the Crossroads: Local Knowledge, Global Encounters May 14-21, 2015

    Haidy Geismar
    14 Oct 2014 | 12:35 am
    Via Jason Jackson, Mathers Museum The Indiana University Mathers Museum of World Cultures and School of Global and International Studies invite applications for up to eight Museum Partners who will take part in an innovative international workshop on the future of museums of culture and history. The call for applications for Museums at the Crossroads: Local Knowledge, Global Encounters closes November 15, 2014. Across the world, as academically based scholars of social and cultural theory graft new shoots onto the older disciplinary roots of their work, their counterparts in the museum…
 
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    Museum Anthropology

  • Call for Applications: Museums at the Crossroads: Local Knowledge, Global Encounters

    21 Oct 2014 | 6:49 pm
    A Summer Institute of the Mathers Museum of World Cultures and the School of Global and International Studies, Indiana University Bloomington, Indiana, USA May 14-21, 2015 The Indiana University Mathers Museum of World Cultures and School of Global and International Studies invite applications for up to eight Museum Partners who will take part in an innovative international workshop on
  • Hopi Artifacts Back Home with Arizona Tribe

    17 Oct 2014 | 1:43 pm
    Arizona Daily Star September 27, 2014 A Hopi official says 24 ceremonial items purchased last year at a French auction house have been returned to the tribe in northern Arizona.Leigh Kuwanwisiwma, director of the Hopi Cultural Preservation Office, says representatives from the Annenberg Foundation brought them Friday afternoon to the village of Walpi on Hopi land.He says a cultural ceremony was
  • Museum Anthropology Leaders: Steve Lekson, University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, Boulder, Part 2

    13 Oct 2014 | 6:24 am
    Exclusive Museum Anthropology Blog Interview with Steve Lekson, Curator of Archaeology and Professor of Anthropology, Univeristy of Colorado Museum of Natural History, Boulder This interview is the third installment in a our series, Museum Anthropology Leaders, where blog intern Lillia McEnaney will be interviewing various anthropological museum professionals. The first installment in the series
  • Council for Museum Anthropology's Student Travel Awards

    9 Oct 2014 | 8:34 pm
    The Council for Museum Anthropology is pleased to announce this year’s Student Travel Awards, which support graduate student travel to the annual AAA meeting to present papers and/or posters. Hannah Turner (University of Toronto, Faculty of Information) and Joseph Feldman (University of Florida, cultural anthropology) will receive the 2014 awards.  Turner’s Ph.D. research in information
  • 2014 Michael M. Ames Award for Innovative Museum Anthropology

    6 Oct 2014 | 8:33 pm
    The Council for Museum Anthropology is very pleased to announce that Dr. Leslie Witz and Dr. Noëleen Murray are the recipients of the 2014 Michael M. Ames Award for Innovative Museum Anthroplogy. Their long-term work with the Lwandle Migrant Labour Museum and their book Hostels, Homes, Museum: Memorializing Migrant Labour Pasts in Lwandle, South Africa (2014) exemplify the kind of pioneering
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    Kimberly Christian's Garcinia Cambogia

  • 3 Raw Food Diet Secrets!

    admin
    24 Oct 2014 | 3:11 pm
    When Janet Lindvall sat in front of her computer, food obvious that she needed lower belly fat. It was an ugly sight to see rolls of fat bulging out from her ab. Fact 9: Metabolic disorders will cause weight realize. Diabetes and hypo thyroid are the most widespread. You need to be medically examined if believe any hang ups. As the cat ages, toxin damage occurs and the best way to make plant based protein supplement cat healthy is by supplying all of them herbs and anti-oxidants like quercitin and rutin sustain their energy. So do you want to get large, beautiful muscles? A person wish…
  • Fat Burning Exercise Advice Foolproof Exercises Guaranteed To Burn Fat Fast

    admin
    13 Aug 2014 | 2:26 am
    Bouncing could be the simplest of the rebounding exercises. it correctly, stand within middle belonging to the rebounder, with your feet shoulder-width apart and start bouncing. Begin this exercise very gently and surely able to balance yourself properly, start bouncing more rigid. The more you bend your knees, much more you can bounce harder. However, take care not to lift an individual a far too much, definitely disbalance . To make this exercise very much effective, make it strenuous by starting to jog at one put. Research has shown that bouncing and jogging on a rebounder share the same…
  • Acid Reflux Alternative Treatments- The Only Remedies For Gerd

    admin
    7 Aug 2014 | 5:51 am
    Natural Cure Gout Remedies are on the list of fastest growing therapy for the most painful type of arthritis, gout. But do you know that millions of consumers are becoming addicted to painkillers for their gout pain? Although the minds and principles of reduced glycemic index diet selection and are healthy, there is little change evidence to suggest that simply eating foods with a lower GI could make you lose excessive fat. There are other things to factor in, in addition to quantity of food eaten (and in order that the number of calories), and activity qualifications. If you eat 3000…
  • How Shed More Calories Fast — 6 Tips To Burn More Calories Fast

    admin
    20 May 2014 | 10:40 pm
    Losing weight has turn into problem by most people nowadays. Generally, statistics reveal that 65% of adult males and 55% of adult females are overweight/obese. That rather a number right? And i’m pretty without doubt of all the people here article, incredible belong in this overweight nfl. When it comes down to losing pounds fast, diet is focused 75% on the solution. Undoubtedly one of the best diets for losing weight quickly is a “paleo-style” diet based around lean proteins, fish, vegetables, raw fruit, nuts, and seeds with little or no grains or “white” carbs…
  • Awesome Weightloss Secrets Reduction Supplement Central Rapid Weight Loss Program

    admin
    10 May 2014 | 5:10 pm
    For too long we are usually hoodwinked by misconceptions and diet supplements. We’ve been blinded by false commercials and advertisements. We have been told how the answer to weight loss comes through a mere product or pill. Quite frankly, we all know they’re all false. Functions to fat loss is a well known fact. We all are able to achieve health inside, but we’ve been lied to for as long that our former ideals have been distorted. Thus, I give all my own engagement ring approach when using this subject. I’m hoping the readers will source the points presented useful in…
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    Somatosphere

  • Ebola 2014. Chronicle of a well-prepared disaster by Guillaume Lachenal

    Guillaume Lachenal
    31 Oct 2014 | 12:15 am
    A French version of this piece was originally published in Libération on 18 September 2014. “It is useless to laboriously interpret disaster movies in terms of their relation to an ‘objective’ social crisis or even to an ‘objective’ phantasm of disaster,” wrote Jean Baudrillard in 1981. “It is in another sense that (…) it is the social itself that, in contemporary discourse, is organised along the lines of a disaster-movie script In its Saturday, 13 September edition, the French daily Libération devoted several columns of its paper to the analysis of apocalyptic films,…
  • Web Roundup: What Are You Afraid Of? by Emily Goldsher-Diamond

    Emily Goldsher-Diamond
    29 Oct 2014 | 8:16 am
    With Halloween just days away, October’s roundup will look at some of the macabre and spooky insights the web had to offer this month. Fear being a sensory experience–a pounding heart, shortness of breath, sweaty palms and vision problems are among the physiological markings of fear–it’s no surprise that science, medicine and the media valiantly make attempts each year to explain away the reasons we scare easy, and why some people seek out horror and gore. Antiquity Now points to a connection between increased dopamine receptors in the brain and thrill-seeking…
  • From the dragon’s perspective: an initial report on China’s response to the unfolding Ebola epidemic by Emilio Dirlikov

    Emilio Dirlikov
    29 Oct 2014 | 12:15 am
    On a steamy mid-August afternoon, Mariatu Kargbo, a Sierra Leonian expat residing in Beijing, stood at the front of a packed hotel ballroom. As reported by Xinhua News (新华网), Kargbo addressed the crowd, saying: I know everyone has come because they would like to support us, but I really didn’t know that today so many people would come, thank you everyone! What we’ve done today is to say to Ebola ‘You cannot go forward, you need to stop’! Kargbo had organized the event as a fundraiser to support ongoing efforts to stop the Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone. To this end, a variety of…
  • In the Journals — October 2014, Part II by Serena Stein

    Serena Stein
    27 Oct 2014 | 10:26 am
    Below you will find Part II of our journal coverage for October…   Disability and the Global South Special Issue: Globalizing Mental Health or Pathologising the Global South? Mapping the Ethics, Theory and Practice of Global Mental Health China Mills and Suman Fernando   Critical Public Health Food as pharma: marketing nutraceuticals to India’s rural poor Alice Street This commentary sketches out the politics of the expansion of affordable, fast-moving nutraceutical products into rural India, with a focus on fortified foods and beverages. It examines the relationships between…
  • Call for papers: Dreaming of Health and Science in Africa: Aesthetics, Affects, Poetics and Politics by Ann Kelly

    Ann Kelly
    27 Oct 2014 | 7:20 am
    This conference seeks to open a conversation on forms of possibility and violence that are enabled and take effect through dreams of health and science in Africa. Dreams are often of transformation, critical of the present and articulating alternative and imaginative futures towards which expertise, knowledge and care might lead. Dreams can also engender violence and turn into nightmares. Aspirations to health and advancement can be stoked as fictions while their achievement is systematically postponed, or trivialised as pipe-dreams, whittling down science and medicine to fit the present…
 
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    Visual Anthropology of Japan - 日本映像人類学

  • A New Android Who "Can Do Japanese Sign Language"

    8 Oct 2014 | 10:19 pm
    Accompanying text: Toshiba has developed a lifelike communication android that can move its arms and hands smoothly and use Japanese sign language. The android is a prototype that the company will continue to develop towards achieving a service robot able to assist people in the fields of welfare and healthcare. The android will be showcased at CEATEC JAPAN 2014, which will be held from October 7 to 11.Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=izH08FB2mxULifelike? Smoothly? Use Japanese Sign Language? Really? (The JSL is horrible, barely understandable...) Despite not having a face, ASIMO's sign…
  • "Own a pair of secret camera shoes? The police should be by shortly for a visit"

    28 Sep 2014 | 6:32 pm
    From Japan Today, September 25, 2014: For most of this summer, Kyoto Prefectural Police have been carrying out an aggressive campaign of going to people’s homes and asking them to voluntarily give up their shoes with built-in hidden cameras. These house calls have resulted in hundreds of pairs of these “tosatsu shoes” (voyeur shoes) winding up in police custody. The shoes contain a hidden camera in the toe behind some mesh which is operated by a remote control This plan to deter the use of tosatsu shoes to illegally film in private areas such as up women’s skirts had proved so…
  • Ethics of Visual Anthropology in Japan - Part Eight: The Dialogue Continues

    23 Sep 2014 | 12:00 am
    I cannot believe it has been 5 years since the beginning of VAOJ's Shooting Culture in Japan project. The first goal of the project was to establish and suggest some guidelines for shooting film and photographs in Japan for students in my Visual Anthropology of Japan course. Through the years my students have produced successful blogs, photo exhibitions and films with no major ethical or legal problems. The second goal of the project was to begin and promote dialogue and discussion of the methods and ethics of shooting culture with an emphasis on Japan. VAOJ produced seven posts providing…
  • Free and Open Access of Alexander Street Press Anthropology Resources (limited time only)

    9 Sep 2014 | 7:20 pm
    Announcement via EASIANTH. This is free access to a wide variety of films, text and other resources. Take advantage of this open access while you can! For a limited time the full range of Alexander Street Press anthropology collections, video and text, are available open access to the academic community. Access to all our anthropology collections is available until 30 September using the following link: http://cts.vresp.com/c/?AlexanderStreetPress/0e2dffab45/c5f17653f7/6da9ee2676Just click on the collections in your area of interest and start exploring today -there are seven collections…
  • The Tribe - "Performed entirely in sign language with nary a subtitle nor a syllable of spoken dialogue"

    8 Sep 2014 | 8:34 pm
    Photo and story borrowed from Variety.com.Actions, emotions and desperate impulses speak far louder than words in “The Tribe,” a formally audacious coup de cinema that marks a stunning writing-directing debut for Ukrainian filmmaker Myroslav Slaboshpytskiy. Set largely within the walls of a boarding school for the deaf that reveals itself as a violent cesspool of organized crime, this bleak, pitiless yet weirdly exhilarating drama is performed entirely in sign language by an ensemble of non-professional young actors, with nary a subtitle nor a syllable of spoken dialogue — a demanding…
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    International Cognition and Culture Institute

  • Another look at the two-systems model of mindreading

    25 Oct 2014 | 8:50 am
    Apperly and Butterfill (2009) and Butterfill and Apperly (2013) have proposed a two-systems model of mindreading. According to this model, humans make use of two distinct psychological systems in mindreading tasks. The model rests on three related claims. First of all, the early-developing system, which is taken to be efficient, fast and inflexible, is supposed to explain the positive findings based on spontaneous-response tasks showing that infants can track the contents of others’ false beliefs. The later-developing system, which is taken to be slower, inefficient and…
  • [extended deadline] Berlin Symposium on Reciprocity and Social Cognition

    1 Oct 2014 | 6:05 am
    The deadline for submissions to this symposium has been extended to November the 1st.A symposium on 'Reciprocity and social cognition' organized by Anna Strasser, Stephen Butterfill, Richard Moore, Olle Blomberg will take place at the Berlin School of Mind and Brain, 23–25 March 2015. The call for poster deadline is extended to November 1, 2014.Abstract: 
Reciprocity is a common feature of much social cognition. For example, when two people attend to the same object simultaneously they can do so merely in parallel or jointly; only the latter of which involves…
  • Cultural Evolution at the Santa Fe Institute

    3 Sep 2014 | 12:59 am
    Last May, Daniel Dennett gathered, at the Santa Fe Institute, a handful of people who have written about cultural evolution. The general impression was that (as he tweeted some time later) "the meeting revealed a lot of unexpected comon ground". The International Cognition and Culture Institute is happy to publish, by way of proceedings, each participant's summary. Comments are open! Daniel Dennett's introduction (with comments). Participants' summaries (in alphabetical order): Susan Blackmore, Robert Boyd, Nicolas Claidière, Peter Godfrey-Smith, Joseph…
  • Perspectives on Cultural Evolution, by Daniel C. Dennett

    2 Sep 2014 | 1:01 am
    These are Daniel Dennett's introductory remarks on the workshop on cultural evolution he conveyed in Santa Fe in May 2014. Click to see the summaries and comments by Blackmore, Boyd, Claidière, Godfrey‑Smith, Henrich, Morin, Richerson, Sperber, Sterelny. Perspectives on Cultural Evolution (Footnotes contain comments by Richerson and Sperber.)Ever since Darwin’s Descent of Man (1871), the idea of adopting an evolutionary perspective on human culture has seemed to many to be a natural move,  obviously worth trying—and to many others to be a…
  • Call for posters: Reciprocity and Social Cognition

    25 Aug 2014 | 11:48 am
    The Berlin School of Mind and Brain organizes a symposium on "Reciprocity and Social Cognition", from the 23rd to the 25th of March, 2015. Keynote speakers will be Richard Moran, Julia Fischer and Natalie Sebanz (Cognitive Science, CEU Budapest). The deadline to submit a poster is the first of October. Complete call below the fold.
 
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    Glossographia

  • Review: Malafouris, How things shape the mind

    schrisomalis
    27 Oct 2014 | 6:03 am
    Malafouris, Lambros. 2013. How things shape the mind: a theory of material engagement. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. 321 pp. Reviewed by Michael Thomas (Wayne State University) In How Things Shape the Mind, the archaeologist Lambros Malafouris outlines his Material Engagement Theory, which developed along the lines of inquiry initiated by Colin Renfrew in his work on measurement and weights. Renfrew, thus, provides a useful introduction to Malafouris’ book. In essence, material engagement is a synthetic approach of a few important developments in the archaeological study of materiality,…
  • Review: Saxe, Cultural development of mathematical ideas

    schrisomalis
    19 Oct 2014 | 8:01 pm
    Saxe, Geoffrey B. 2012. Cultural development of mathematical ideas.  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 393 pp. Reviewed by Summar Saad (Wayne State University) In Cultural Development of Mathematical Ideas, Geoffrey B. Saxe takes an ambitious approach in exploring the cultural and cognitive origins of mathematical thought. Using an extensive number of experiments oriented towards the particular practices of the Oksapmin of Papua New Guinea, Saxe demonstrates that individual action in relation to collective activities such as economic exchange and schooling is the “locus of both the…
  • Review: Ingold, Lines: a brief history

    schrisomalis
    18 Oct 2014 | 12:08 pm
    Ingold, Tim. 2007. Lines: A Brief History. Cambridge, MA and London: Harvard University Press. 186pp. Reviewed by Molly Hilton (Wayne State University) Get out your walking stick and your comfortable shoes as you accompany Tim Ingold on this intellectual wayfarers’ journey exploring the “comparative anthropology of the line” (p1). In his path-breaking book, Lines: A Brief History, Ingold guides readers through a unique theoretical model that explores the interconnected and enmeshed lines of people and things. Ingold argues things and people are the sum of interconnected lines; to study…
  • Lexiculture: 2014 word list

    schrisomalis
    7 Oct 2014 | 9:06 pm
    As I mentioned a couple of months ago, I am doing a new iteration of my Lexiculture Project in my undergraduate linguistic anthropology course, which I ran last year to some success (with eight papers published here online).  Over the next month, each of them will research the history, social context, cultural significance, and transformations of one English word, chosen from the list below.  Today I shared the word list with my students, giving them a couple of days to mull over their choices before the signup goes live, and so, in case you’re interested, here it is! actress…
  • Review: Lloyd, Cognitive variations

    schrisomalis
    4 Oct 2014 | 12:59 pm
    Lloyd, G.E.R. 2007. Cognitive variations: reflections on the universality and diversity of the human mind. Oxford; New York: Clarendon Press; Oxford University Press. 201 pp. Reviewed by Grace Pappalardo (Wayne State University) G.E.R. Lloyd’s Cognitive Variations is loyal to its name, exploring a wide variety of cognitive differences as well as similarities cross-culturally and historically. Lloyd vehemently supports a cross-disciplinary approach to understanding cognitive variations and proves this time and again throughout the text, exploring and analyzing arguments in favor of both…
 
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    media/anthropology

  • Journalists and indignados: the importance of being there

    John Postill
    8 Oct 2014 | 6:30 am
    In 2011, the young Spanish journalist Juanlu Sánchez (@juanlusanchez) covered the indignados (15M) movement from its very inception, spending many long hours at Madrid’s Puerta del Sol square getting to know the occupiers. In this adaptation of an interview with the documentary filmmaker Stephane Grueso (@fanetin) that took place in late 2011, Juanlu reflects on how he and other journalists (independent and mainstream, Spanish and foreign) covered the unfolding events on the ground. His story provides us with some tantalising glimpses into the complex relations that developed between…
  • Snowden on winning the alternative Nobel prize

    John Postill
    25 Sep 2014 | 12:47 pm
    via The Guardian Edward Snowden issues a recorded statement after being awarded Sweden’s Right Livelihood Honorary Award, dubbed the ‘alternative Nobel Prize’. The National Security Agency whistleblower says he accepts the award on behalf of those who risked their lives to help ‘resist unlawful and disproportionate mass surveillance’. He says the award serves as a ‘vindication’ for such efforts. Any contribution that I have made has been a result of the efforts of some many other people working in journalism, in activism, in the human rights…
  • The Mediterranean Spring

    John Postill
    3 Sep 2014 | 7:34 am
    In this post the Spanish-Syrian blogger and activist Leila Nachawati recounts her participation in Spain’s indignados (15M) movement in the wake of the Arab Spring, as well as her efforts to explain this movement to friends and colleagues in the Arab world and the United States. In doing so, she draws parallels and contrasts between the new protest movements that were born in 2010-2011 on both shores of the Mediterranean. I have abridged, translated and adapted the text below from an interview with Stéphane Grueso that took place in Madrid towards the end of 2011. This is the sixth…
  • The long-term impact of the new protest movements

    John Postill
    24 Aug 2014 | 8:48 am
    In early 2011, the Spanish blog entrepreneur Julio Alonso joined other netizens in switching his attention from internet issues to his country’s profound economic and political crisis. The story below recounts this transition as well as giving us Alonso’s particular take on the indignados (15M) movement, shaped by his technological expertise. It is translated and adapted from an interview by Stéphane Grueso that took place in Madrid towards the end of 2011. This is the fifth instalment in my freedom technologists series. The full interview is available on YouTube via…
  • The five modes of self-tracking

    John Postill
    7 Aug 2014 | 10:08 pm
    John Postill:By Deborah Lupton Originally posted on This Sociological Life: Recently I have been working on a conference paper that seeks to outline the five different modes of self-tracking that I have identified as currently in existence. I argue that there is evidence that the personal data that are derived from individuals engaging in reflexive self-monitoring are now beginning to be used by agencies and organisations beyond the personal and privatised realm. Self-tracking rationales and sites are proliferating as part of a ‘function creep’ of the technology and ethos of…
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    American Journal of Physical Anthropology

  • Brain organization of gorillas reflects species differences in ecology

    Sarah K. Barks, Michael E. Calhoun, William D. Hopkins, Michael R. Cranfield, Antoine Mudakikwa, Tara S. Stoinski, Francine G. Patterson, Joseph M. Erwin, Erin E. Hecht, Patrick R. Hof, Chet C. Sherwood
    31 Oct 2014 | 5:28 am
    ABSTRACT Gorillas include separate eastern (Gorilla beringei) and western (Gorilla gorilla) African species that diverged from each other approximately 2 million years ago. Although anatomical, genetic, behavioral, and socioecological differences have been noted among gorilla populations, little is known about variation in their brain structure. This study examines neuroanatomical variation between gorilla species using structural neuroimaging. Postmortem magnetic resonance images were obtained of brains from 18 captive western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla), 15 wild mountain…
  • A bioarchaeological approach to the reconstruction of changes in military organization among Iron Age Samnites (Vestini) From Abruzzo, Central Italy

    Vitale Stefano Sparacello, Vincenzo d'Ercole, Alfredo Coppa
    31 Oct 2014 | 5:27 am
    ABSTRACT The Samnites were an Iron Age population that shifted from warlike mountain dwellers to the largest sociopolitical unit of central Italy, able to dispute with Rome the domination over the peninsula. Archaeological and historical evidence suggests that this major shift in the scale of conflict may have involved a reorganization of the military system, which changed from an elite militia to a conscript or standing army from the Orientalizing-Archaic (800–500 BC) to Hellenistic times (400–27 BC). We propose a bioarchaeological framework jointly analyzing skeletal properties and…
  • Diet, society, and economy in late medieval Spain: Stable isotope evidence from Muslims and Christians from Gandía, Valencia

    Michelle M. Alexander, Christopher M. Gerrard, Alejandra Gutiérrez, Andrew R. Millard
    28 Oct 2014 | 10:18 pm
    ABSTRACT This article investigates the diets of neighboring Christians and Muslims in late medieval Spain (here 13th–16th centuries) through the analysis of the stable isotopes of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) in adult human and animal bone collagen. Twenty-four Christians and 20 Muslims are sampled from two adjacent and contemporaneous settlements in the township of Gandía on the Mediterranean coast, together with the remains of 24 animals. Statistical differences in both δ13C and δ15N reveal that the diets of the two faith communities differed, despite living side-by-side. These…
  • The Politics of Species: Reshaping Our Relationships with Other Animals. Edited by Raymond Corbey and Annette Lanjouw. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 2013. xiv + 295 pp. ISBN 978-1-107-03260-6. $99.00 (cloth).

    Jonathan Marks
    28 Oct 2014 | 10:16 pm
  • Human–wildlife conflict: Proximate predictors of aggression between humans and rhesus macaques in India

    Brianne A. Beisner, Allison Heagerty, Shannon K. Seil, Krishna N. Balasubramaniam, Edward R. Atwill, Brij K. Gupta, Praveen C. Tyagi, Netrapal P.S. Chauhan, B.S. Bonal, P.R. Sinha, Brenda McCowan
    27 Oct 2014 | 9:48 pm
    ABSTRACT Macaques live in close contact with humans across South and Southeast Asia, and direct interaction is frequent. Aggressive contact is a concern in many locations, particularly among populations of rhesus and longtail macaques that co-inhabit urbanized cities and towns with humans. We investigated the proximate factors influencing the occurrence of macaque aggression toward humans as well as human aggression toward macaques to determine the extent to which human behavior elicits macaque aggression and vice versa. We conducted a 3-month study of four free-ranging populations of rhesus…
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    Anthropogenesis

  • Ancient Ust’-Ishim DNA as Seen From the Americas

    German Dziebel
    23 Oct 2014 | 12:02 pm
    Nature 514, 445–449 (23 October 2014) doi:10.1038/nature13810 Genome sequence of a 45,000-year-old modern human from western Siberia Qiaomei Fu, Heng Li, Priya Moorjani, Flora Jay, Sergey M. Slepchenko, Aleksei A. Bondarev, Philip L. F. Johnson, Ayinuer Aximu-Petri, Kay Prufer, Cesare de Filippo, Matthias Meyer, Nicolas Zwyns, Domingo C. Salazar-Garcıa, Yaroslav V. Kuzmin, Susan G. Keates, Pavel A. Kosintsev, Dmitry I. Razhev, Michael P. Richards, Nikolai V. Peristov, Michael Lachmann, Katerina Douka, Thomas F. G. Higham, Montgomery Slatkin, Jean-Jacques Hublin, David Reich, Janet…
  • Web Gems, November 22, 2013

    German Dziebel
    22 Nov 2013 | 7:01 am
    I’ve been monitoring global web responses to Raghavan et al.’s “Upper Palaeolithic Siberian Genome Reveals Dual Ancestry of Native Americans”that appear in the comments sections on Dienekes, Gene Expression and Eurogenes sites. The Web Gem Reward of this week goes to Kristiina from Finland who poignantly asks: “I would like someone to explain me why the ancient 15k Amerind admixture in Europeans is visible but the ancient massive East Asian admixture in Amerinds is not?” It’s remarkable that out of thousands of people who visit these sites daily and…
  • Ancient DNA from Mal’ta and Afontova Gora: A Full Account

    German Dziebel
    20 Nov 2013 | 12:29 pm
    Courtesy Alexander Kim, the long-awaited paper by the Eske Willerslev team became finally available to me. This is obviously not the last word on the subject of Amerindian origins, and the David Reich Lab has a different interpretation of ancient and modern DNA data, which is more consistent with an Amerindian-like admixture in West Eurasians. But Raghavan et al. 2013 is a fascinating end-of-the-year read that shows once again that science is like wine: it gets only better with age. Upper Palaeolithic Siberian Genome Reveals Dual Ancestry of Native Americans Maanasa Raghavan, Pontus Skoglund,…
  • A Closer Look at Human and Neandertal Mitogenomes

    German Dziebel
    14 Nov 2013 | 9:12 pm
    In one of my comments on Anthrogenica.com, I mistakenly denied that Behar et al. (2012) reported the two mutations A2758G and G7146A shared between late European Neandertals and the modern human L2’3’4’5’6 clade. As a reminder, A2758G and G7146A were highlighted in a recent paper by Malyarchuk as a possible evidence of hybridization with recombination between European Neandertals and modern humans belonging to the L2’3’4’5’6 clade (see phylogeny below).   Behar et al. 2012 did this and in fact more. Let’s look closer at their tree…
  • Kunstkamera: Pseudoanthropology at Anthrogenica.com

    German Dziebel
    14 Nov 2013 | 4:01 pm
    I spent the last few days posting at a forum called Anthrogenica.com debating “archaic admixture” in mtDNA and Y-DNA, answering questions regarding viable alternatives to out-of-Africa and observing the online behaviors of “science bloggers.” As always, my counterarguments against the out-of-Africa theory and an out-of-America alternative caused a controversy. As a participant observer, I identified three different kinds of out-of-Africa advocates and out-of-America detractors, which tend to recur across forums but are represented by three concrete individuals at…
 
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    The Path of The Sun

  • ON CNN & TWITTER TONIGHT

    26 Oct 2014 | 1:59 pm
    SAFE & SUSTAINABLE AYAHUASCATonight on Lisa Ling's This is Life, a CNN series the medicinal brew Ayahuasca featured in part 2 of The Path of the Sun series is getting a full hour of national broadcasting attention due to it's potential medical benefits that are now getting attention. This follows on the heals of several well publicized news stories about hallucinogens that are making a comeback in psychotherapeutic research for addiction at NYU under Stephan Ross, PhD and for cancer related research at John's Hopkins under Roland Griffiths, PhD.In this episode…
  • BONUS FOOTAGE DELAY

    9 Oct 2014 | 8:47 am
    Hi all,I am busy at work assembling the bonus footage for distribution, but have missed the deadline.  My apologies.  Rest assured that it will be available soon and I promise it will be better than expected.  I appreciate your patience and will continue to provide updates.  I do not have a specific date when it will be ready, but it will be prior to the end of the month.  That's a guarantee.Best,Seti GershbergDirector/Producer
  • Bonus Material Timeline

    29 Sep 2014 | 6:20 pm
    Today was to be the day that I announced that bonus materials would be ready. However, I am delaying the announcement for 1 more week and I thank you for your patience. I have been spending the past weeks since the film's release on September 1, 2014 reviewing the interview footage from the film and creating what I call interview only movies. A question is asked and then it is answered exactly like it is during an interview. The material is excellent and instead of rushing to put something in your hands that is not up to the highest quality simply to meet a deadline is not something that I…
  • Review by Author Matthew J. Pallamary

    16 Sep 2014 | 3:28 pm
    Ayahausca Nature's Greatest Gift has received a review from author Matthew J. Pallamary.  He writes: "Ayahuasca Nature's Greatest Gift takes you into the heart of Ayahuasca shamanism and pulls aside the veil to provide valuable insight into the gifts that only a loving mother can give from those who know her intimately. There are lots of mysteries and misconceptions around the use of these sacred plants and their effects and there are many “sharks in the water” waiting to prey on the uninformed and starry-eyed innocents who are seeking a prehistoric spiritual path that precedes the…
  • REDDIT Q&A Transcript

    2 Sep 2014 | 11:44 am
    The following transcript (in it's entirety) is the result of a Reddit AMA I conducted on Shamanism, Ayahausca, The Q'ero and Filmmaking I conducted on September 1, 2014.The shortlink for the actual event is http://redd.it/2f6cbo or just read below....TRANSCRIPTI am Seti Gershberg a filmmaker and anthropologist who studied shamanism for two years in remote regions of Peru while filming my documentary series about mystical practices and the hallucinogenic plant medicine ayahuasca - Ask me anything.......submitted 1 day ago by SetiFX My short bio: Seti Gershberg is an…
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