Anthropology

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  • British origins (with ancient data)

    Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog
    Dienekes
    20 Jul 2015 | 2:34 pm
    Related:British Origins (Leslie et al. 2015)bioRxiv http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/022723 Iron Age and Anglo-Saxon genomes from East England reveal British migration history Stephan Schiffels, Wolfgang Haak, Pirita Paajanen, Bastien Llamas, Elizabeth Popescu, Louise Lou, Rachel Clarke, Alice Lyons, Richard Mortimer, Duncan Sayer, Chris Tyler-Smith, Alan Cooper, Richard Durbin British population history has been shaped by a series of immigrations and internal movements, including the early Anglo-Saxon migrations following the breakdown of the Roman administration after 410CE. It remains an open…
  • CFP: Media, culture and change across the Pacific

    media/anthropology
    John Postill
    13 Aug 2015 | 6:11 am
    by Raul Castro via the EASA Media Anthropology Network mailing list Call for Papers Media, culture and change across the Pacific: perspectives from Asia, Oceania and the Americas Pontificia Universidad Católica del Peru (PUCP), Lima, Peru, 16-17 November 2015 Important updates 21 Aug 2015: The conference website has now been launched Selected papers will be published in an invited special issue of the international journal Media, Culture and Society As the ‘Pacific century’ gathers pace, important questions arise about the media and communication dimensions of processes of social,…
  • Rethinking the dispersal of Homo sapiens out of Africa

    Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog
    Dienekes
    13 Aug 2015 | 8:33 am
    An excellent review which -among its other graces- demolishes the view that mtDNA haplogroup L3 provides a terminus post quem of 70 thousand years for the Out-of-Africa expansion, a question I've discussed in this blog before.I think the evidence is overwhelming at this point that there were modern humans outside Africa before 100,000 years ago. The argument that they were a  failed expansion is shoddy and is based, as far as I can tell on things like the age of L3, the assumption that Y-chromosome haplogroup E is native to Africa and not derived from back-to-Africa migrants, the…
  • Older adults possess important forms of expertise

    Anthropology News -- ScienceDaily
    28 Aug 2015 | 7:22 am
    New research on aging and skill development provides the most complete analysis to date of skill development in a traditional society. The results show that most skills essential to Tsimane survival are acquired prior to first reproduction, and then develop further to meet the increasing demands of offspring.
  • Unusual use of blue pigment found in ancient mummy portraits

    Anthropology News -- ScienceDaily
    26 Aug 2015 | 11:41 am
    In an unexpected discovery, a research team of scientists and art conservators has found an unusual use of the pigment Egyptian blue in Roman-era Egyptian mummy portraits. No blue is visible to the naked eye in the paintings, but when the researchers used analytical tools for an in-depth study, they discovered the ancient artists used the pigment as material for underdrawings and for modulating color -- a finding never before documented.
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    Anthropology.net

  • We´re now on Twitter

    Tim Jones
    31 Aug 2015 | 4:19 am
    @AnthroDotNet Please feel free to follow, and more importantly to read and add feedback, where deemed desirable or necessary. The plan is to add more content here at Anthropology.net, though quite how regularly as yet remains to be seen.Filed under: Blog
  • Say Hello to Australopithecus deyiremeda, A Newly Discovered 3.4 Million Year Old Hominid

    Kambiz Kamrani
    28 May 2015 | 6:11 am
    This fragment of upper jaw (shown) was discovered sitting on top of the sediment in the Woranso-Mille area of central Afar in Ethiopia. Anthropologists have now identified it as belonging to a new species of early human ancestor called Australopithecus deyiremeda that lived between 3.3 million and 3.5 million years ago A study published in Nature today announces the 2011 discovery of Australopithecus deyiremeda a hominid that lived between 3.3 and 3.5 million years ago. The species is represented by a maxilla, mandible and dentition found in the Woranso-Mille area of the Afar region of…
  • 3.3 Million Year Old Stone Tools Predate Homo By 500,000 Years

    Kambiz Kamrani
    20 May 2015 | 4:45 pm
    Tool unearthed at excavation site. Credit: MPK-WTAP 149 stone flakes, hammers and anvils, found off at the Lomekwi 3 site on the shores of Lake Turkana, appears to have been crafted more than 3.3 million years ago — 500,000 years before our genus Homo. The authors reported their findings in Nature this week. Sonia Harmand and her team accidentally stumbled upon the ancient artifacts after taking a wrong turn and found a different place with stone tools on the surface of a site called Lomekwi 3. You can read more about their discovery at The Conversation. Filed under: Archaeology, Blog…
  • A Neandertal Ancestor for a Early European

    Kambiz Kamrani
    15 May 2015 | 3:39 pm
    This 40,000–year–old human mandible, found in a Romanian cave, has a mix of human and Neanderthal traits; genetic analysis suggests the person had a close Neanderthal ancestor 4–6 generations back. At last week’s Biology of Genomes meeting in Cold Spring Harbor, New York, Qiaomei Fu, a palaeogenomicist at Harvard Medical School, raised the concept that modern humans were mating with Neanderthals right near the time they became extinct. She and her team estimate that 5–11% of the genome of the 40,000 year old mandible from Peștera cu Oase, Romania is Neanderthal, including large…
  • Megafloods and the Collapse of Cahokia

    Kambiz Kamrani
    5 May 2015 | 5:34 pm
    My first understanding of Cahokia and pre-Columbian cities of the Americas came from the book 1491. Between 1050 and 1200 A.D., Cahokia was North America’s largest and most prominent cultural center north of Mexico. It wielded economic power and religious influence from the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico. A new paper published in PNAS describes a possible mechanism for its collapse; flooding. A map shows the central district of Cahokia (inset right) in the context of the water levels reached by the flood of 1844 (blue). (Credit: Sam Munoz) The authors stumbled upon this finding. They…
 
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    Savage Minds

  • Anthropologies #21: Climate Change Issue (Introduction)

    Ryan
    30 Aug 2015 | 11:41 am
    For the latest issue of anthropologies, we’re taking a look at the ever contentious subject of climate change. Over the next week or so, we will be posting individual essays from our contributors. At the end we will post the issue in its entirety. Please share, and feel free to post your thoughts and comments. Here’s the introduction, written by Jeremy Trombley, the co-editor for this issue. You can contact him on Twitter here: @jmtrombley. Thanks Jeremy for all of your help putting this issue together! –R.A. Photo by Flickr user Erik Jackson. Original caption: “The…
  • Ethnographic Field Data 3: Preserving and Sharing Ethnographic Data

    Celia Emmelhainz
    28 Aug 2015 | 5:00 am
    [This is the final post in a three-part series on archiving and sharing fieldwork data.] Lisa Cliggett: How can we archive all this data?  Two years ago, I worked with Lisa Cliggett on an NSF-sponsored project to curate 60 years of anthropology projects in the Gwembe Tonga region of Zambia, a complex pilot project that involved anthropologists, campus IT, librarians, and a gullible library school student then-willing to work for free (me!). We experimented with ways to curate Lisa’s field records in a digital library using Greenstone and Drupal. Our goal was a small teaching…
  • Osama Bin Laden, Chelsea Manning, and their anthropologists

    Rex
    27 Aug 2015 | 5:11 pm
    Anthropology can turn up in the strangest places. While we often hold up Margaret Mead and… uh… well, mostly Margaret Mead… as examples of public anthropology, our discipline does a lot of important work in times and places few of us would suspect. For instance, take these two recent examples from the media featuring Chelsea Manning and Osama bin Laden: Most people remember Chelsea Manning (then Bradley) as the person who leaked hundreds of thousands of classified military documents to WikiLeaks. After being imprisoned for the leak, Manning has become an activist and…
  • Toward Living with (not Under) Anthropology, Pt. 2

    Matt Thompson
    25 Aug 2015 | 12:37 pm
    Savage Minds welcomes guest blogger Takami Delisle. Tak currently works as a medical interpreter for Japanese patients and helps run an organization for anthropology students of color. You can read the first installment of this piece here. She also has her own blog. If you’re interested, please contact her through Twitter @tsd1888. Toward Living with (not Under) Anthropology by Takami Delisle Looking back on those years when I was perpetually in fear of disappointing my professors, I realize that’s when I began to question the whole point of anthropology. I wasn’t alone; there have been…
  • Ethnographic Field Data 2: When Not-Sharing is Caring

    Celia Emmelhainz
    25 Aug 2015 | 6:00 am
    In my last post, I recommended that we consider archiving and sharing records from our fieldwork. Yet sharing both raw notes and publications can present challenges, as Rex recently covered with the controversy over Alice Goffman’s ‘anonymous’ but easily traced research in Philadelphia, published after she destroyed her fieldnotes. Kristin Ghodsee similarly writes of the difficulties she encountered as she researched post-Socialist Muslims in Bulgaria—research that caught the interest of both local and American officials. After being detained and interrogated by…
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    Anthropology News -- ScienceDaily

  • Older adults possess important forms of expertise

    28 Aug 2015 | 7:22 am
    New research on aging and skill development provides the most complete analysis to date of skill development in a traditional society. The results show that most skills essential to Tsimane survival are acquired prior to first reproduction, and then develop further to meet the increasing demands of offspring.
  • Unusual use of blue pigment found in ancient mummy portraits

    26 Aug 2015 | 11:41 am
    In an unexpected discovery, a research team of scientists and art conservators has found an unusual use of the pigment Egyptian blue in Roman-era Egyptian mummy portraits. No blue is visible to the naked eye in the paintings, but when the researchers used analytical tools for an in-depth study, they discovered the ancient artists used the pigment as material for underdrawings and for modulating color -- a finding never before documented.
  • Where bread began: Ancient tools used to reconstruct -- and taste -- prehistoric cuisine

    26 Aug 2015 | 7:16 am
    A group of intrepid Israeli researchers recently went back to the dawn of the Stone Age to make lunch. Using 12,500-year-old conical mortars carved into bedrock, they reconstructed how their ancient ancestors processed wild barley to produce groat meals, as well as a delicacy that might be termed 'proto-pita' -- small loaves of coal-baked, unleavened bread. In so doing, they re-enacted a critical moment in the rise of civilization.
  • Earliest baboon found at Malapa

    19 Aug 2015 | 11:36 am
    A team of international researchers has discovered a fossil monkey specimen representing the earliest baboon ever found. Dating back more than two million years ago, the partial skull was found in South Africa's Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site, the same site where the partial skeletons of the new early hominin species, Australopithecus sediba, were discovered in 2010.
  • Book detectives solve puzzles of yesteryear

    19 Aug 2015 | 5:36 am
    Fragile pieces of parchment can be difficult to study because of their age, rarity and susceptibility to contamination. Researchers are developing new high-tech tools to unlock the secrets hidden in old parchment.
 
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    NYT > Archaeology and Anthropology

  • Temple of Baal in Palmyra Is Damaged by ISIS

    31 Aug 2015 | 9:00 pm
    The attack was the group’s second on the ancient Syrian city’s world-renowned ruins in a week, according to local activists and residents.
  • The V.C.s of B.C.

    29 Aug 2015 | 9:00 pm
    A cache of clay tablets provides an unusual look at an ancient but strikingly familiar-looking economy — and confirms a modern truth about trade.
  • The Crimes of Palmyra

    25 Aug 2015 | 9:00 pm
    The Islamic State’s destruction of Palmyra’s ancient ruins is not only a crime against Syria but a tragedy for collective human history.
  • ISIS Speeds Up Destruction of Antiquities in Syria

    24 Aug 2015 | 9:00 pm
    The cumulative toll inflicted on antiquities by militants, who destroyed a fifth-century monastery and a first-century temple recently, has reached staggering levels, archaeologists and officials say.
  • A Piece of the Earliest Baboon Ever Found

    24 Aug 2015 | 9:00 pm
    A two-million-year-old skull fragment was found in the same South African cave that turned up specimens of an early ancestor to humans in 2010.
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    Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog

  • Rethinking the dispersal of Homo sapiens out of Africa

    Dienekes
    13 Aug 2015 | 8:33 am
    An excellent review which -among its other graces- demolishes the view that mtDNA haplogroup L3 provides a terminus post quem of 70 thousand years for the Out-of-Africa expansion, a question I've discussed in this blog before.I think the evidence is overwhelming at this point that there were modern humans outside Africa before 100,000 years ago. The argument that they were a  failed expansion is shoddy and is based, as far as I can tell on things like the age of L3, the assumption that Y-chromosome haplogroup E is native to Africa and not derived from back-to-Africa migrants, the…
  • Mesolithic monolith from Sicilian Channel

    Dienekes
    11 Aug 2015 | 2:18 pm
    Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports Volume 3, September 2015, Pages 398–407 A submerged monolith in the Sicilian Channel (central Mediterranean Sea): Evidence for Mesolithic human activityEmanuele Lodolo, Zvi Ben-Avraham The ancient geography of the Mediterranean Basin was profoundly changed by the increase in sea level following the Last Glacial Maximum. This global event has led to the retreat of the coastlines, especially in lowland areas and shallow shelves, such as the Sicilian Channel. The NW sector of this shelf, known as Adventure Plateau, is studded by isolated shoals mostly…
  • Prehistoric farmers from northern Greece had lactose intolerance, brown eyes, dark skin

    Dienekes
    6 Aug 2015 | 11:00 pm
    According to this:Πολύ σημαντικό πρόσφατο εύρημα αποτελεί η ανάκτηση ολόκληρων γονιδιωμάτων από τρεις προϊστορικούς αγρότες, που έζησαν στη Βόρεια Ελλάδα 7.500 με 5.500 χρόνια πριν από σήμερα. Τα δεδομένα αυτά αναλύονται και αναμένεται να ρίξουν φως στις προγονικές σχέσεις των πρώτων Ευρωπαίων και να δώσουν πλήθος πληροφοριών, που…
  • Paleoamericans galore

    Dienekes
    25 Jul 2015 | 2:53 pm
    Two new papers in Nature and Science add to the debate on Native American origins. The first study (in Nature) detects that some Amazonians have a few percent ancestry from a group related to Australasians, which suggests that early native Americans were not homogeneous but came in two flavors: the main one found all over the Americans and the Australasian-related one. The second study (in Science) looks at ancient "Paleoamerican"-postulated populations and finds that they don't have any particular relationship to Australasians. Thus, whatever population brought the "Paleoamerican"…
  • British origins (with ancient data)

    Dienekes
    20 Jul 2015 | 2:34 pm
    Related:British Origins (Leslie et al. 2015)bioRxiv http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/022723 Iron Age and Anglo-Saxon genomes from East England reveal British migration history Stephan Schiffels, Wolfgang Haak, Pirita Paajanen, Bastien Llamas, Elizabeth Popescu, Louise Lou, Rachel Clarke, Alice Lyons, Richard Mortimer, Duncan Sayer, Chris Tyler-Smith, Alan Cooper, Richard Durbin British population history has been shaped by a series of immigrations and internal movements, including the early Anglo-Saxon migrations following the breakdown of the Roman administration after 410CE. It remains an open…
 
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    Kimberly Christian's Garcinia Cambogia

  • Which Vitamins For Alopecia Promote Healthful Hair Growth

    admin
    30 Aug 2015 | 7:02 am
    A person have or an a single can relate for this experience, chances are possible that you live through gout. Sally by contrast needs an entire revamp of her dietary regimen. However, systemic disease and behavioral tend to be thought being more common causes than allergic virus. Slumber through any for the following: blood pressure (hypertension), diabetes, hyperlipidemia (high levels of fat or cholesterol in blood), arteriosclerosis (narrowing in the arteries), recent surgery or bed rest, and recent chemotherapy? It could possibly be due to changes your bird’s environgment such given…
  • Nicotinamide Riboside Smart Investment For Your Health

    admin
    14 May 2015 | 12:23 am
    Investing in solar power is one of the finest investments someone can earn when in for you to saving money in the future. But with this semi-new technology the cost of solar panel can be extremely high. What you should consider is that to select from of great places you can buy used solar panels and even better there are cheap and easy methods that you can make your own. Here are something you really should know before you buy an used solar array. But explanations do you have we care so much about the extent of shading? You may not realize this, nevertheless the effect of shading is…
  • Top 5 Fish Oil Supplements as Recommended by AlivebyNature.com

    admin
    29 Mar 2015 | 12:10 pm
    Glutamine is easily the most the most abundant amino acids in requires. The amount of the usb ports that you have now in method is mainly stored inside your skeletal muscles and plasma television. The rest with it is seen in your lungs which will be the it is originally done. It is released during throughout the stress, as an example during a hardcore workout. It’s during this period that is necessary to supplement extra sources of glutamine for the body can’t synthesize consequently it fulfill those demands. Never attend a party feeling hungry. Bring a snack to work and show it…
  • Pure Forloskin: How To Buy It

    admin
    15 Dec 2014 | 11:43 am
    Weight Loss is certainly an obsession for millions. What is the best way to shed pounds? How can I lose weight quickly? What method can help me lose surplus weight? These burning questions keep many of us awake at nighttime. This article will explore some of probably the most frequently asked questions associated with reduction. For most of us, we need to have answers to our questions before deciding which approach will yield the outcomes. The following thing can need test is consume a reasonable diet while choosing HCA. Eating appropriate portions of healthier foodstuffs results in a steady…
  • Facts About alivebynature Weight-Loss Product

    admin
    11 Nov 2014 | 3:15 pm
    Eczema is actually definitely an inflammation of the skin wherein the patches of skin may be red, itchy and slough off. The cause of this disease is unknown as it can certainly occur on any part of the body but is typically found on an arms, knees, elbows and knees. For anybody who is looking for natural treating of eczema, it can be be serious. But some in the most common places you’re able to find things for these natural remedies, are place like the grocery store, vitamin stores such as alivebynature, other sorts of stores. Applying witch hazel towards affected area a few times a day…
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    Somatosphere

  • What’s in a name? by Ruth Goldstein

    Ruth Goldstein
    31 Aug 2015 | 2:34 am
    “Is writing seemly? Does the writer cut a respectable figure? Is it proper to write? Is it done?” - Jacques Derrida, “Plato’s Pharmacy” in Disseminations   “I choose… Estrella. Yes, you can call me Estrella when you write.” “Are you sure?” I asked. Estrella nodded her head, a wisp of dyed honey-blonde hair coming loose from behind her ear. Her long earrings, the gold paint flaking around a plastic ruby, swayed back and forth as she nodded in affirmation. Yes, she was sure. “You can write if you want,” Estrella gestures to my notebook that sits on the table. I…
  • Community Health Workers and Social Change: Global and Local Perspectives — A special issue of the Annals of Anthropological Practice by Aaron Seaman

    Aaron Seaman
    25 Aug 2015 | 1:08 pm
    The current issue of the Annals of Anthropological Practice is a special issue, entitled “Community Health Workers and Social Change: Global and Local Perspectives.” The issue comprises an introduction by Kenneth Maes and five articles, the abstracts of which are below. Enjoy! Community health workers and social change: An introduction Kenneth Maes Major global health institutions, public and private, currently see community health workers (CHWs) as crucial resources. But the daily experiences and complex motives of CHWs, as well as their concerns and criticisms, remain poorly…
  • “Bioculturalism” — An interview with Christopher Lynn by Christopher D. Lynn

    Christopher D. Lynn
    24 Aug 2015 | 9:29 am
    This series aims to get anthropologists and closely-related others talking seriously, and thinking practically, about how to synergize biological and social scientific approaches to human health and well-being, and to what positive ends. In this interview, Christopher Lynn responds to questions posed by series organizer Jeffrey G. Snodgrass.   How and why might cultural anthropologists and social scientists interested in health benefit from integrating biological variables/biomarkers into their research and analysis? Cultural anthropologists and other social scientists interested in…
  • Limn issue no. 5: Ebola’s Ecologies by Todd Meyers

    Todd Meyers
    18 Aug 2015 | 8:09 am
    We’d like to help spread the word about the recent issue of Limn, edited by Andrew Lakoff, Stephen J. Collier and Christopher Kelty, now in print. From the editors: “This issue of Limn on “Ebola’s Ecologies” examines how the 2014 Ebola outbreak has put the norms, practices, and institutional logics of global health into question, and examines the new assemblages that are being forged in its wake. The contributions focus on various domains of thought and practice that have been implicated in the current outbreak, posing questions such as: What has been learned about the…
  • “He didn’t blow us up”—routine violence and non-event as case by Ken MacLeish

    Ken MacLeish
    17 Aug 2015 | 1:58 am
    This case is a story that a soldier told me. I call her Kelly, and she said it was “the craziest story I was gonna get” from her. So for her it was an extreme, a worst case, but also a kind of telos of conditions she lived with and feelings she felt every day in occupied Iraq. It was a case of something not happening. As is fitting for those tensions of normalcy and emergency and rule and suspension that characterize state violence, it was both exceptional and part of a pattern: the pattern of soldiers’ embodied terror and vulnerability (even as they surely inspired terror in vulnerable…
 
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    Analog/Digital

  • Learning from failure: The case of the disappearing Web site

    9 Aug 2015 | 5:46 am
    This article that I wrote with David Zeitlyn and Viktor Mayer-Schönberger based on the digital ethnographic research I did for the Oxford Internet Institute/Oxford Anthropology in 2014/15 came out in May 2015. I've been traveling and working in Europe this summer and haven't had time to post it until now. Read it online (for free!) at First Monday: Learning from Failure: The case of the disappearing web site.Abstract: This paper presents the findings of the Gone Dark Project, a joint study between the Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology and the Oxford Internet Institute at Oxford…
  • Survey for Anthropologists

    19 Mar 2014 | 9:20 am
    The Open Anthropology Cooperative exists because back in 2009, a group of like-minded anthropologists from around the world came together to create something genuinely new using a combination of free and open technologies, social media and self-government. In 2014, we're now looking at a fairly altered media landscape. Anthropology has also moved on, with greater awareness of open access, public anthropology and academic power imbalances, all originally sources of the OAC's founding philosophies. We were occupying academic anthropology before it became mainstream!The OAC homepage has nearly…
  • Global cities: digital urbanisation in the 21st century

    2 Mar 2014 | 8:51 am
    Full details about my panel at IUAES/JASCA Inter-congress 2014 are now available. View the complete list of accepted papers and abstracts here. The conference will take place from 15th to 18th May 2014 in Chiba City, Tokyo, Japan. Please share and attend! The overall theme of the conference is The Future with/of Anthropologies. Registration is open. Follow the link for information and fees. Global cities: digital urbanisation in the 21st century (Commission on Urban Anthropology)The landscape for Anthropological investigation is changing rapidly with the approaching ubiquity of digital…
  • Gone Dark Project: Preserving the vanishing web

    28 Feb 2014 | 12:01 pm
    The Oxford Anthropology "Gone Dark" Project on web preservation is now on Facebook. "Like" the page to join us. You can also take part in further discussion at the Open Anthropology Cooperative: What happens when websites die?Post by Oxford Anthropology Gone Dark Project.
  • eReader/Tablet Review: Barnes & Noble Nook HD 7"

    26 Dec 2013 | 10:00 am
    Nook HD 7" and a piece of toast, courtesy of barnesandnoble.com. I don't know why.For the paperless academic on a budgetVirtually every article about improving one's academic workflow (note-taking, reading, writing and general office/mobile productivity) begins and ends with the iPad. In some respects, makes a lot of sense. On top of design, branding and marketing elements, Apple also has the advantage of a well-stocked app store. An important trade-off here is a hefty price tag. Meanwhile, there are plenty of devices for well under $200 that offer promising features and competitive app…
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    Visual Anthropology of Japan - 日本映像人類学

  • "Japan to introduce video visitation system for parents in cross-border custody disputes"

    29 Aug 2015 | 12:06 am
    From The Japan Times, 8/28/15: The Foreign Ministry will in September introduce a virtual visitation system to enable parents to meet children who have been abducted by their estranged partners under the Hague convention on cross-border custody disputes. Set to be the first of the convention’s 93 signatory countries to introduce such a system, the videoconferencing facility will be offered for parents seeking child visitation rights, a ministry official said on Friday. “We thought meeting through the Internet is a practical means, given that children and separated partners are living far…
  • "Photo exhibition focuses on faces, lives of Tokyo’s homeless"

    27 Aug 2015 | 10:18 am
    Photo and text from The Japan Times, 8/27/15. An ongoing photo exhibition in Tokyo illustrates a burning desire of people living on the streets: to simply build normal relationships with the rest of society. The Tokyo Metropolitan Human Rights Promotion Center currently displays 42 photos of the homeless, taken by freelance photographer Hideaki Takamatsu, who began the project out of curiosity about how the homeless live. Takamatsu started shooting photos of the homeless in 1994, when he attended a photography school after graduating from college with aspirations of becoming a…
  • My Neighborhood is Wired!

    23 Aug 2015 | 7:48 am
  • "Japan rail firm switches on ‘drunk spotting’ cameras"

    20 Aug 2015 | 7:59 am
    From The Japan Times, 8/19/15: A Japanese railway company is turning to cameras as a way to spot drunken behavior and keep late-boozing patrons from tumbling onto the tracks, a spokesman said Wednesday. West Japan Railways (JR West) has installed nearly 50 closed-circuit television cameras at its Kyobashi train station in Osaka to stop accidents that frequently involve legions of late-drinking “salarymen.” The suited city workers are well-served by extensive urban train networks that whisk them back home at the end of the night. While the worst that happens to most corporate warriors is…
  • "No drop in orders for Taiji dolphins despite restriction"

    12 Aug 2015 | 3:10 am
    VAOJ grows weary in its continuing reporting of "The Cove" related news. But here's the latest... From The Japan Times, 8/11/15: Orders for dolphins caught in drive hunts in Taiji, Wakayama Prefecture, this fiscal year are coming in at almost the same rate as before even though the Japanese Association of Zoos and Aquariums has banned its members from buying animals caught via such methods. A local fishermen’s union said Monday that the orders are mostly coming in from facilities that are not members of JAZA and dealers who may be exporting the dolphins.Feel free to read the whole story at…
 
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    International Cognition and Culture Institute

  • For the record: A commentary by Csibra, Senju, et al. on gaze following

    27 Aug 2015 | 5:50 am
    In 2008, Atsushi Senju and Gergely Csibra published in Current Biology (18, 668–671) an often quoted and important contribution to natural pedagogy theory: “Gaze following in human infants depends on communicative signals.” In 2014, J. Szufnarowska, Rohlfing, K.J., Fawcett, C., & Gredebäck, G. published in Scientific Reports (4, 5304) a discussion of Senju and Csibra’s article, under the title “Is ostension any more than attention?" Senju, Csibra and collaborators replied to Szufnarowska et al's in an online commentary in Scientific…
  • 'Speaking Our Minds' Book Club

    17 Aug 2015 | 1:47 am
    From mid-June to mid-July 2015, the ICCI website has hosted a Book Club devoted to Thom Scott-Phillips’ book, Speaking Our Mind. The book has received positive reviews in various media, including the Times Literary Supplement (read Richard Moore's review here), and has been called "an amazing job" (Stuart West),“the most important and best book ever written on the evolution of language” (Dan Sperber). The participants were:  Thom Scott-Phillips (with a précis of his book; see also his concluding remarks)Alberto Acerbi (his post) Clark Barrett (his post) Bart de Boer (his…
  • Reflections on the Speaking Our Minds book club

    13 Aug 2015 | 5:08 am
    I can say without reservation or qualification that the Speaking Our Minds (SOM) book club was the single most challenging and rewarding intellectual experience of my career to date. Every day for two weeks some very bright and engaged people posted extensive comments on my work, and initiated many excellent conversations. It is a privilege to have one’s work be the focus of so much attention and good quality debate, and I would like to express my gratitude to cognitionandculture.net for the opportunity.So many good points were made that I almost want to rewrite the book! That’s an…
  • State of the art research on social behavior

    18 Jul 2015 | 1:29 am
    In Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences 2015, 3, a really useful open access collection of review papers on state of the art research on social behavior edited by Molly Crockett and Amy Cuddy. From their introduction: “Social interactions shape and reflect who we are, influence what we do, and profoundly affect our wellbeing. The past decade has seen dramatic advances in our understanding of the neural underpinnings and real-world outcomes of social behavior. Here, we bring together a stellar collection of papers addressing current and pressing issues in the study of social behavior. We…
  • Communication without Metapsychology

    2 Jul 2015 | 9:58 pm
    This is an excellent book. I cannot think of another on this topic that matches its clarity, concision, accessibility, comprehensiveness, and argumentative rigor. I’m quite amazed that Scott-Phillips has managed to combine such seemingly antithetical virtues in one work. The discussion is also admirably honest: Scott-Phillips owns up to the obvious weaknesses with the view and offers strong responses.I am a little embarrassed and anxious, therefore, because I disagree with most of the main theses of the book. Not all of them. Scott-Phillips persuades me that pure code theories of language…
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    Anthropological Notebook

  • Latest fieldwork photos: Penan

    17 Aug 2015 | 6:25 pm
    A few early photos from this year's fieldwork: View this iPhone panorama in large size on Flickr
  • Cyborg anthropology: catching the sun (2)

    19 May 2015 | 11:42 pm
    If you've been waiting for updates on my adventures with the solar kit, it's a bit like watching the kettle boil. Little to report so far. I had some trouble with the V72 battery (the one that stores power from the solar panels); it seemed to be leaking power, with the lights on the charge indicator dropping overnight from 5 (100%) to 4 (80%) while sitting idle. Tony at Voltaic Systems
  • Cyborg anthropology: catching the sun (1)

    12 May 2015 | 11:08 am
    I've used solar kits in the field before: photo on left is from my 2005 Cambodia fieldwork, and shows the (monocrystalline) solar panels catching sunlight from the roof of the car (with bemused 4-legged audience). The kit worked fine, but obviously wasn't too portable (I mean walkable, for ambulatory fieldwork). For Sarawak fieldwork (2009–2010) I used Thin Film PV panels: again, worked great
  • New blog: International Summer School in Southeast Asian Studies

    18 Mar 2015 | 5:10 am
    Interested in Southeast Asia, the study of, the thinking about, the living in? We have a new blog, mainly to showcase the work of our postgraduate participants in the International Summer School in Southeast Asian Studies, an annual two-week programme jointly-organised by Universiti Sains Malaysia in Penang (USM), the Institute of Asian and African Studies of Humboldt Universität zu Berlin (
  • Aliran Down the Ages

    30 Jan 2015 | 9:45 am
    Here's a bit of Malaysian social history, as seen through the work of Aliran, Malaysia's oldest human rights group. Watch how information dissemination styles have changed since the 1970s, when the group was founded. Past 2010, all the images (and video) were shot by me.  
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    media/anthropology

  • Third session of digital ethnography reading group

    John Postill
    31 Aug 2015 | 2:41 am
    by Will Balmford Research assistant Digital Ethnography Research Centre (DERC) School of Media and Communication RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia Hello all, Welcome to round three of DERG! We’ve got an article by Helen Kennedy this week, entitled ‘Technobiography: Researching lives on and off’. It takes a bit of a different approach to earlier readings, but is an interesting read that will hopefully get us all thinking about how we conceptualise digital experiences. Remember, DERG sessions run on the second Wednesday of each month. Please forward this email to those you think may…
  • CFA: Theorising Media and Conflict workshop, Vienna, 23-24 Oct 2015

    John Postill
    27 Aug 2015 | 12:08 am
    A Media Anthropology Network event European Association of Social Anthropologists (EASA) Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology University of Vienna, Austria 23-24 October 2015 ** Financial assistance available, see below ** In a recent survey of the interdisciplinary literature on media and conflict, Schoemaker and Stremlau (2014) found that most existing studies display Western-centric biases, normative assumptions and unsubstantiated claims about the impact of media in conflict situations. With their ethnographic methods and ground-up theorising, anthropologists are therefore well…
  • 22. Notes on the second digital ethnography reading session

    John Postill
    19 Aug 2015 | 6:14 pm
    This is the twenty-second post in the Freedom technologists series. by Victor Lasa PhD candidate RMIT University, Melbourne In this second session of the monthly Digital Ethnography Reading Group meetings at RMIT we discussed the Introduction and Chapter 5 of Hacker, Hoaxer, Whistleblower, Spy: The Many Faces of Anonymous. Gabriella Coleman. Brooklyn, NY: Verso Books, 2014. 464 pp. In attendance were Will Balmford (digital gaming), Kate Cawley (digital gaming), Andrew Glover (sociology of consumption), Allister Hill (organisational ethnography), Victor Lasa (radical transparency), John…
  • CFP: Media, culture and change across the Pacific

    John Postill
    13 Aug 2015 | 6:11 am
    by Raul Castro via the EASA Media Anthropology Network mailing list Call for Papers Media, culture and change across the Pacific: perspectives from Asia, Oceania and the Americas Pontificia Universidad Católica del Peru (PUCP), Lima, Peru, 16-17 November 2015 Important updates 21 Aug 2015: The conference website has now been launched Selected papers will be published in an invited special issue of the international journal Media, Culture and Society As the ‘Pacific century’ gathers pace, important questions arise about the media and communication dimensions of processes of social,…
  • Mobiles and protest: four areas in need of further theorisation

    John Postill
    30 Jul 2015 | 7:00 pm
    Extract from Monterde, A. and J. Postill 2014. Mobile ensembles: The uses of mobile phones for social protest by Spain’s indignados. In G. Goggin and L. Hjorth (eds.) Routledge Companion to Mobile Media. London: Routledge, 429-438. […] This broad overview of the mobiles for activism and protest literature reveals four main areas of theorisation in need of further development. First, the specific affordances of different mobile technologies matter and should not be subsumed under general notions such as ‘new media’ or ‘digital media’. As we saw with the English riots, the low…
 
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    American Journal of Physical Anthropology

  • Technical note: An in vitro study of dental microwear formation using the BITE Master II chewing machine

    Li-Cheng Hua, Elizabeth T. Brandt, Jean-Francois Meullenet, Zhong-Rong Zhou, Peter S. Ungar
    26 Aug 2015 | 4:48 am
    ABSTRACT Dental microwear has been used for decades to reconstruct the diets of fossil hominins and bioarchaeological populations. The basic theory has been that hard-brittle foods (e.g., nuts, bone) require crushing and leave pits as they are pressed between opposing cheek-tooth surfaces, whereas soft-tough foods (e.g., grass blades, meat) require shearing and leave scratches as they are dragged along opposing surfaces that slide past one another. However, recent studies have called into question the efficacy of microwear as an indicator of diet. One issue has been the limited number of in…
  • Entangled lives: Implications of the developmental origins of health and disease hypothesis for bioarchaeology and the life course

    Rebecca L. Gowland
    26 Aug 2015 | 4:47 am
    ABSTRACT Epidemiological research since the 1980s has highlighted the consequences of early life adversity, particularly during gestation and early infancy, for adult health (the “Barker hypothesis”). The fast-evolving field of molecular epigenetics is providing explanatory mechanisms concerning phenotypic plasticity in response to developmental stressors and the accumulation of disease risk throughout life. In addition, there is now evidence for the heritability of poor health across generations via epigenetic modifications. This research has the potential to invoke a paradigmatic shift…
  • Interpreting adult stature in industrial London

    Gail Hughes-Morey
    25 Aug 2015 | 5:48 am
    ABSTRACT ObjectivesThis study examines adult stature and its association with risk of mortality in two skeletal collections from industrializing London, taking sex and socioeconomic status into account as potential sources of heterogeneity in frailty. MethodsMean femur and tibia lengths and the distributions of short femora and tibiae were examined in adult skeletons from the cemeteries at Lower Saint Bride's (low status) and Chelsea Old Church (high status). Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine if stature was associated with risk of mortality and how that relationship…
  • Revisiting the Phenice technique sex classification results reported by MacLaughlin and Bruce (1990)

    Clare McFadden, Marc F. Oxenham
    25 Aug 2015 | 5:46 am
    ABSTRACT  Phenice (Am J Phys Anthropol 30 (1969):297–301) reported a success rate of 96% for his method of sex determination based on three morphological features of the pelvis. Numerous studies have tested and evaluated the method with affirmative results. The results of the study by MacLaughlin and Bruce (J Forensic Sci 35 (1990):1384–1392) were inconsistent with other studies, reporting far lower rates of accuracy and a greater degree of interobserver error. The authors believe that this may be the result of the inclusion of an “ambiguous” classification category. Revised…
  • Antiquity and geographic distribution of cranial modification among the prehistoric groups of Fuego-Patagonia, Chile

    Marta P. Alfonso-Durrruty, Bretton T. Giles, Nicole Misarti, Manuel San Roman, Flavia Morello
    24 Aug 2015 | 6:15 am
    ABSTRACT ObjectivesNineteenth and twentieth century documents testify that four ethnic groups, generally classified as terrestrial hunters or canoe nomads, inhabited Fuego-Patagonia. Archaeologically, however, their presence and temporal depth remains unknown. This study analyzes the antiquity and geographic distribution of cranial modification, a highly visible symbol of social identity, in Fuego-Patagonia, Chile, to assess whether it expressed ethnic affiliation. Materials and MethodsA total of 60 adult skulls from Southern Patagonia (n = 32; 53.3%) and Tierra del Fuego (n = 28;…
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    BOAS Network

  • Where bread began: Ancient tools used to reconstruct and taste prehistoric cuisine

    BOAS
    27 Aug 2015 | 3:30 pm
    Team including researchers from Bar-Ilan University and Harvard University unravel the mystery of 12,500-year-old rock-cut mortars found throughout Southwestern Asia Source: BAR-ILAN UNIVERSITY Photo: Dr. David Eitam peeled the hull of wild barley grains in a narrow conical mortar with a long wooden pestle during the experiment  Credit: Sara Katzburg A group of intrepid Israeli researchers recently went back to the dawn of the Stone Age to make lunch. Using 12,500-year-old conical mortars carved into bedrock, they reconstructed how their ancient ancestors processed wild barley to produce…
  • IXSOL: The Best IT Solution Providers

    dannyvassar123
    5 Aug 2015 | 2:02 am
    This is era when we are compelled to use the latest technology and utilize technical resources to mark a worth noticeable presence in the industry. Businesses owners, both emerging and experienced ones, are considering utilizing different kinds of technology solutions to take their business to the next level. If you also want to grab the attention of target audience and expand your customer base by integrating the best IT support and online marketing solutions in your business, then IXSOL is the best company at your service, providing the best IT solutions and internet marketing services for…
  • New archaeological discovery in Greece

    BOAS
    3 Aug 2015 | 2:01 pm
    Dig sheds light on island sanctuary. A total of 13 buildings have been unearthed over the years on Despotiko isle, off Antiparos. 30 Jul 2015 Ongoing excavation work at an archaeological site on Despotiko, a small uninhabited islet off the Aegean island of Antiparos, has yielded significant finds that shed new light on the size and organization of an Archaic sanctuary situated there, the Culture Ministry said on Wednesday. Archaeologists first started excavating the site in 1997 under the supervision of Yiannos Kouragios, gradually revealing the outlines of a large religious sanctuary dating…
  • Dig Returns to Artifact-Rich Colonial American Site in NY

    BOAS
    31 Jul 2015 | 1:22 pm
    In this Thursday, July 23, 2015 photo, Brooke Wendling and Danielle Silverman look for a building foundation at an archaeological dig at Lake George Battlefield Park in Lake George, N.Y. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)  The Associated Press LAKE GEORGE, N.Y. — Jul 31, 2015, 3:24 AM ET By CHRIS CAROLA Associated Press An archaeological project has returned to an artifact-rich state park in the southern Adirondacks on what was the focal point of the warring British and French empires more than 250 years ago. A team of students and volunteers is trying to determine if a low stone wall along the edge of…
  • Great Synagogue Remains Rediscovered 70 Years after Destruction by Nazis

    BOAS
    30 Jul 2015 | 3:09 pm
    Israeli, Lithuanian and American researchers have tracked down the remains of the Great Synagogue of Vilna. A Ground Penetrating Radar survey conducted in June 2015 in Vilnius, Lithuania has uncovered the underground remains of the Great Synagogue and Shulhof of Vilna, now lying partially below a modern school. These important remnants of what was before the Holocaust, Lithuania’s greatest synagogue, will be exposed in an excavation to commence next year. The magnificent Great Synagogue of Vilna (Vilnius) in Lithuania, was the oldest and most significant monument of Litvak Jewry. Sadly,…
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