Anthropology

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  • Made in Palestine

    Material World
    Haidy Geismar
    17 Jul 2014 | 4:16 am
    Christopher Pinney, UCL [Please note: this  post was written before the intensification of the current Israeli offensive on Gaza] I decided to transgress the BDS (Boycott, Disinvestment and Sanctions) injunction and attend a conference on ‘The Photographic Imagination’ in Tel Aviv in June 2014 for several reasons.  The two central ones concerned, firstly, the Apartheid analogy. Having taught a short course at the University of Cape Town in 2000 it was quite apparent that there were many courageous dissident academic intellectuals that had been a key element of the resistance during the…
  • Blinn Introducing New Courses for Fall Semester

    anthropology - Yahoo News Search Results
    31 Jul 2014 | 9:14 am
    Blinn College will debut several new courses when the Fall semester begins August 27th, 2014, including a physical anthropology course that transfers to Texas A&M University as a science core credit and a kinesiology course that also transfers as a core class at A&M.
  • Barry Hewlett: The anthropologist who joined the ebola outbreak team

    Savage Minds
    Rex
    31 Jul 2014 | 4:02 pm
    Anthropology surfaced briefly in the mainstream media earlier this week when NPR ran a story entitled “Why anthropologists join an ebola outbreak team“. It was a good story with some useful links. But I thought I’d dig a little deeper and talk more about Barry Hewlett, the anthropologist who joined the ebola outbreak team, his work, and what it says about the value of anthropology. I’ve never met Hewlett, but I know his work. He’s been writing on ebola for over ten years now, since the 2000-2001 outbreak in Uganda, and his book on ebola, Ebola, Culture and…
  • Otzi Iceman had genetic predisposition for atherosclerosis: Much the same in ancient peoples as it is today

    Anthropology News -- ScienceDaily
    30 Jul 2014 | 5:37 pm
    While prevalence and types of risk factors for atherosclerosis have varied over time from ancient times to modern society -- such as levels of obesity, physical activity -- genetic predisposition/risk for the condition today appears to be very similar to that in ancient times.
  • A 52-Million-Year-Old Window Into the Future

    NYT > Archaeology and Anthropology
    14 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    A fossil, only two inches long, discovered in British Columbia is determined to be of a hedgehog that lived 52 million years ago, during the early Eocene epoch.
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    anthropology - Yahoo News Search Results

  • Blinn Introducing New Courses for Fall Semester

    31 Jul 2014 | 9:14 am
    Blinn College will debut several new courses when the Fall semester begins August 27th, 2014, including a physical anthropology course that transfers to Texas A&M University as a science core credit and a kinesiology course that also transfers as a core class at A&M.
  • Bonobos Invade 'Planet of the Apes' (Op-Ed)

    28 Jul 2014 | 11:25 am
    Brian Hare is an associate professor of evolutionary anthropology at Duke University, and Vanessa Woods is the author of "Bonobo Handshake" (Gotham, 20011). Woods and Hare are on the board of the nonprofit Lola ya Bonobo, a sanctuary for orphan bonobos in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The "Planet of the Apes" movie series has always been about males: Male characters for male audiences, doing ...
  • ECU notes: Digging for history

    26 Jul 2014 | 8:11 pm
    Ten rising high school juniors and seniors got busy this summer digging and sifting through 18th century dirt behind a standing slave cabin in Grimesland.
  • Finding The Anthropology In Latin Dance Music

    23 Jul 2014 | 1:41 pm
    The Uruguayan singer-songwriter Jorge Drexler, a former doctor, is known as a literate and introspective musician. But then he wondered how his brainy musings would translate to music for the body.
  • Anthropologists gather for “Reflecting on Disasters” forum in DC

    20 Jul 2014 | 5:44 pm
    DAVAO CITY (MindaNews / 20 July) — In celebration of Philippine Anthropology Day, anthropologists and anthropology students as well as representatives from other disciplines, will gather at the Ateneo de… »
 
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    Savage Minds

  • Barry Hewlett: The anthropologist who joined the ebola outbreak team

    Rex
    31 Jul 2014 | 4:02 pm
    Anthropology surfaced briefly in the mainstream media earlier this week when NPR ran a story entitled “Why anthropologists join an ebola outbreak team“. It was a good story with some useful links. But I thought I’d dig a little deeper and talk more about Barry Hewlett, the anthropologist who joined the ebola outbreak team, his work, and what it says about the value of anthropology. I’ve never met Hewlett, but I know his work. He’s been writing on ebola for over ten years now, since the 2000-2001 outbreak in Uganda, and his book on ebola, Ebola, Culture and…
  • Blame and responsibility: Part three

    Bree Blakeman
    29 Jul 2014 | 4:39 am
    This is the third in a series of posts looking at the way Yolŋu people consider issues of blame and responsibility. You can find the introduction here, and the case study, here. In the following, part three, I will work back through the anatomy of events in the case study using the Bernard Wiener’s framework for ‘the responsibility process’ – who was rebuked or punished? Who was considered blameworthy? And finally, what did people determine was the cause of the event that triggered reparatory action in the first place? Who was rebuked or punished? The first question to ask is who…
  • Around the Web Digest: Week of July 20

    Dick Powis
    27 Jul 2014 | 12:35 pm
    The anthroblogosphere is still a pretty quiet this week, but some (like Merrill Singer and Agustín Fuentes) have seemingly picked up some of the slack. Definitely give their articles a read, as they have some pretty important messages to impart. If you have an important messages to impart, preferably in the form of blogs or news articles, send them my way for next week’s digest at richard.powis@gmail.com or on Twitter at @dtpowis. Right this way. By anthropologists:  Celia Emmelhainz has invited her readers to learn more about an understudied group, the Nairarbi and their mysterious form…
  • Blame and responsibility: The case study [Part two]

    Bree Blakeman
    25 Jul 2014 | 11:08 pm
    [This is the second in a series of posts looking at the way Yolŋu people consider issues of blame and responsibility. You can find part one here.] The setting for this case study is a remote island community in Arnhem Land, Northern Australia. The population of the community is approximately 2,124. This is one five larger central communities in a region characterised by networks of significantly smaller remote Aboriginal Homeland communities.   ‘There had been gossip for some months that Gaymarani, who is married with twin boys (around six years old), had been running around with…
  • “The Most Wonderful Shade of Brown”

    Rex
    24 Jul 2014 | 6:07 pm
    Anthropologists are good at critiquing other anthropologists and themselves. We have a lot to be guilty about and we do a good job of pointing that out. The politics of anthropology, and the politics of the politics of anthropology are a major part of what we do. In fact, we’re so good at doing it that I think at times we forget what we have actually done wrong. We spend more time reading dismissals of our ancestors than we do the ancestors themselves. One of my most memorable moments in graduate school was when Fredrik Barth — who I have a lot of respect for — came to give…
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    Anthropology News -- ScienceDaily

  • Otzi Iceman had genetic predisposition for atherosclerosis: Much the same in ancient peoples as it is today

    30 Jul 2014 | 5:37 pm
    While prevalence and types of risk factors for atherosclerosis have varied over time from ancient times to modern society -- such as levels of obesity, physical activity -- genetic predisposition/risk for the condition today appears to be very similar to that in ancient times.
  • Ice age lion figurine: Ancient fragment of ivory belonging to 40,000 year old animal figurine unearthed

    30 Jul 2014 | 6:38 am
    Archaeologists have found an ancient fragment of ivory belonging to a 40,000 year old animal figurine. Both pieces were found in the Vogelherd Cave in southwestern Germany, which has yielded a number of remarkable works of art dating to the Ice Age. The mammoth ivory figurine depicting a lion was discovered during excavations in 1931. The new fragment makes up one side of the figurine’s head.
  • Prehistoric dairy farming at the extremes

    29 Jul 2014 | 7:49 pm
    Finland's love of milk has been traced back to 2500 BC, thanks to high-tech techniques to analyze residues preserved in fragments of ancient pots.
  • Violent aftermath for the warriors at Alken Enge

    29 Jul 2014 | 6:31 am
    Denmark attracted international attention in 2012 when archaeological excavations revealed the bones of an entire army, whose warriors had been thrown into the bogs near the Alken Enge wetlands in East Jutland after losing a major engagement about 2,000 years ago. Work has continued in the area since then and archaeologists have now made sensational new findings.
  • Fire ecology manipulation by California native cultures

    26 Jul 2014 | 5:23 am
    Before the colonial era, 100,000s of people lived on the land now called California, and many of their cultures manipulated fire to control the availability of plants they used for food, fuel, tools, and ritual. Contemporary tribes continue to use fire to maintain desired habitat and natural resources.
 
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    Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog

  • Wine cup of Pericles found

    Dienekes
    30 Jul 2014 | 2:29 pm
    Wine cup used by Pericles found in grave north of AthensExperts are "99 per cent" sure that the cup was used by the Athenian statesman, as one of the other names listed, Ariphron, is that of Pericles' elder brother. "The name Ariphron is extremely rare," Angelos Matthaiou, secretary of the Greek Epigraphic Society, told the newspaper. "Having it listed above that of Pericles makes us 99 per cent sure that these are the two brothers," he said.Finding the cup of Pericles is cool, but finding his actual tomb would be even cooler. Thanks to Pausanias and other ancient observers, the location…
  • Lethal mutations quantified

    Dienekes
    29 Jul 2014 | 8:07 am
    A very interesting new preprint on the arXiv (so it can be freely read). The founder population is the Hutterites. The key sentence:Our approach indicates that on average, one in every two humans carries a recessive lethal allele on the autosomes that lead to lethality after birth and before reproductive age or to complete sterility.arXiv:1407.7518 [q-bio.PE] An estimate of the average number of recessive lethal mutations carried by humans Ziyue Gao, Darrel Waggoner, Matthew Stephens, Carole Ober, Molly Przeworski The effects of inbreeding on human health depend critically on the number and…
  • Ancestry of Cubans

    Dienekes
    26 Jul 2014 | 11:24 am
    PLoS Genet 10(7): e1004488. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1004488 Cuba: Exploring the History of Admixture and the Genetic Basis of Pigmentation Using Autosomal and Uniparental Markers Beatriz Marcheco-Teruel et al. We carried out an admixture analysis of a sample comprising 1,019 individuals from all the provinces of Cuba. We used a panel of 128 autosomal Ancestry Informative Markers (AIMs) to estimate the admixture proportions. We also characterized a number of haplogroup diagnostic markers in the mtDNA and Y-chromosome in order to evaluate admixture using uniparental markers. Finally, we…
  • More selection on the X than in autosomes in humans

    Dienekes
    17 Jul 2014 | 6:46 am
    Mol Biol Evol (2014) doi: 10.1093/molbev/msu166 Evidence for Increased Levels of Positive and Negative Selection on the X Chromosome versus Autosomes in Humans Krishna R. Veeramah et al. Partially recessive variants under positive selection are expected to go to fixation more quickly on the X chromosome as a result of hemizygosity, an effect known as faster-X. Conversely, purifying selection is expected to reduce substitution rates more effectively on the X chromosome. Previous work in humans contrasted divergence on the autosomes and X chromosome, with results tending to support the faster-X…
  • Craniofacial feminization and the origin of behavioral modernity

    Dienekes
    17 Jul 2014 | 5:14 am
    Current Anthropology Vol. 55, No. 4, August 2014Robert L. Cieri et al.Abstract: The past 200,000 years of human cultural evolution have witnessed the persistent establishment of behaviors involving innovation, planning depth, and abstract and symbolic thought, or what has been called “behavioral modernity.” Demographic models based on increased human population density from the late Pleistocene onward have been increasingly invoked to understand the emergence of behavioral modernity. However, high levels of social tolerance, as seen among living humans, are a necessary prerequisite…
 
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    Material World

  • Best of Material World Blog: Landscape and Place

    Patrick LAVIOLETTE
    23 Jul 2014 | 11:34 am
    Patrick Laviolette (EHI, Tallinn University, hosts of EASA2014) In terms of providing reflections on the material dimensions of place and landscape, here are some links to what I feel have been amongst the more provocative postings on the blog over the years. Many of the authors to the links below implicitly, or sometimes even explicitly ask: how do we depict our spatial experiences through the digital medium of blogging? In Feb 2007, Graeme Were put up a piece simply entitled ‘Footpaths‘ byKate Cameron-Daum. It is an eye-catching post which stirred my own curiosity on methods of…
  • Made in Palestine

    Haidy Geismar
    17 Jul 2014 | 4:16 am
    Christopher Pinney, UCL [Please note: this  post was written before the intensification of the current Israeli offensive on Gaza] I decided to transgress the BDS (Boycott, Disinvestment and Sanctions) injunction and attend a conference on ‘The Photographic Imagination’ in Tel Aviv in June 2014 for several reasons.  The two central ones concerned, firstly, the Apartheid analogy. Having taught a short course at the University of Cape Town in 2000 it was quite apparent that there were many courageous dissident academic intellectuals that had been a key element of the resistance during the…
  • Best of Material World Blog: Museums, Exhibitions, Archives, Memorials

    Aaron Glass
    14 Jul 2014 | 6:05 pm
    – Compiled by Aaron Glass (Bard Graduate Center)  Since its inception, Material World has treated museums and archives not only as repositories of material culture, but as material culture–that is, material products as well as producers of culture and social memory. As institutions, they are sites of collection and exhibition, acts that have their own material and materializing dimensions. Here are some of our favorite posts about museums, exhibitions, archives, and memorials: Graeme Were reviews the Musée du Quai Branly a year after it opened. Anna Weinrich examines two…
  • “We left when the bullets were falling like rain:” Syrian refugees’ illustrated stories

    Aaron Glass
    10 Jul 2014 | 1:34 pm
    Earlier this year, artist George Butler spent several days in the refugees’ ‘tented settlements’ of northern Lebanon. His portraits of the people – and the often random possessions they brought with them when they fled their homes – tell their own poignant tales. Picture captions by Nick Rice. Read the full story and see more images in The Guardian… Continue Reading
  • Mundane Objects: Materiality and non-Verbal Communication by Pierre Lemonnier

    Haidy Geismar
    8 Jul 2014 | 4:41 am
    Haidy Geismar, UCL The latest issue of Hau has a symposium on Pierre Lemmonier’s latest book, Mundane Objects, with commentary by Bruno Latour, Chris Ballard, Tim Ingold, Paul Graves-Brown, Susanne Küchler and a response by Pierre Lemmonier. The series of comments essentially sum up a “state of the art” comment on material culture theory, which Tim Ingold pithily sums up to date: Perhaps there is something to be said for going back to the anthropological debates of the 1960s and 1970s on such themes as symbolic condensation, the distinction (or lack of it) between ritual…
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    Museum Anthropology

  • Sweet Briar College Returns 400-year-old Artifacts to Quapaw Tribe

    29 Jul 2014 | 8:20 am
    Jennifer McManamay, Sweet Briar CollegeJuly 25, 2014 A month ago, Karol Lawson surveyed the trunk of her Volkswagon Jetta and judged its contents — carefully packed in clean white boxes wedged among quilted blankets — ready for a journey of more than 1,000 miles. Though she didn’t know it then, in two days’ time a man from the Quapaw Tribe of Indians would sweep a frying pan filled with
  • US Museums Provide Emergency Support for Syria

    25 Jul 2014 | 7:47 pm
    Julia Halperin, The Art Newspaper 18 July 2014 US museums are teaming up with the Syrian Interim Government’s Heritage Task Force to help protect Syrian museum collections and stem the loss of cultural heritage amid the country’s ongoing civil war. Late last month, experts from the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC, and the Pennsylvania Museum’s Penn Cultural Heritage Center quietly
  • Peru Seeks Repatriation of 400 Cultural Artifacts from New York

    21 Jul 2014 | 1:12 pm
    Rachel Chase, Peru This Week Julu 16, 2014 New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art currently houses hundreds of artifacts from the Mochica culture— and Peru wants them back. Peruvian cultural artifacts are making their way home from all over the world— Sweden’s return of the Paracas textiles being a particularly high-profile incidence of repatriation. Now, the regional government of Piura is
  • 16th National Tribal Preservation Conference

    16 Jul 2014 | 9:11 am
    16th National Tribal Preservation Conference "You are invited to participate in the conference, which is open to all interested participants whether or not you are a THPO or NATHPO member.  We encourage all individuals who are interested in learning more about tribal cultural preservation and sharing your knowledge and experiences." Helpful links for conference logistics: Indian Summer
  • Controversial Sale of Museum's 4,500-year-old Egyptian Statue Set to Raise Millions at Auction

    10 Jul 2014 | 2:15 pm
    Culture 24 July 2, 2014The controversial sale of a 4,500-year-old Egyptian statue, set to proceed at a Christie’s auction next week which could raise up to £6 million, will put Northampton Museum and Art Gallery’s future loans and fundraising prospects in jeopardy, the Museums Association has warned.Under the terms of the Arts Council’s Accreditation status, which allows the museum to exchange
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    Somatosphere

  • Web Roundup: Organ Transfer in Open Spaces by Emily Goldsher-Diamond

    Emily Goldsher-Diamond
    31 Jul 2014 | 1:40 pm
    July’s web roundup will focus on recent conversations around organ transfer and its public perception.  Organ transfer, with its complex and oftentimes invisible circuits of body parts, donors, recipients, doctors, markets and the state, is particularly ripe for intervention by social scientists. Ethan Watters’ profile of anthropologist Nancy Scheper-Hughes at Pacific Standard says that her work on organ transfer was, “an opportunity to show how an anthropologist could have a meaningful, real-time, and forceful impact on an ongoing injustice.” In so doing,…
  • In the Journals, July 2014 – Part I by Jason Alley

    Jason Alley
    31 Jul 2014 | 9:08 am
    Critical Public Health “Tracking governance: advice to mothers about managing the behaviour of their children in a leading Canadian women’s magazine during two disease regimes” Juanne N. Clarke This paper explores how advice to mothers about raising healthy children differs in two distinct disease regimes as portrayed in articles in the pre-eminent Canadian women’s magazine Chatelaine about 50 years apart, 1928–1944 and 1990–2012.  The paper compares intensive mothering, medicalization and the perception of risk.  It suggests that both intensive mothering and medicalization…
  • History of Psychiatric Epidemiology — An International Journal of Epidemiology supplement by Aaron Seaman

    Aaron Seaman
    31 Jul 2014 | 2:51 am
    The International Journal of Epidemiology just published a special supplement, edited by Anne Lovell and Ezra Susser and entitled “History of Psychiatric Epidemiology.” The supplement consists of an introduction by Lovell and Susser and five articles, the abstracts of which are below. What might be a history of psychiatric epidemiology? Towards a social history and conceptual account Anne M. Lovell and Ezra Susser This supplement heralds the start of an interdisciplinary and international effort to trace the origins of psychiatric epidemiology. As a first step, these papers focus…
  • Zabala’s Chagas Disease in Argentina by Gabriela Bortz

    Gabriela Bortz
    28 Jul 2014 | 10:04 am
    La enfermedad de Chagas en Argentina. Investigación científica, problemas sociales y políticas sanitarias [Chagas disease in Argentina. Scientific research, social problems and health policies] By Juan Pablo Zabala Universidad Nacional de Quilmes, Argentina.2010. 360 pages.   “Mal de Chagas” is a disease that affects 2.5 million people in Argentina and 8 million in Latin America. Caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, it generates heart, digestive and/or nervous system problems that may lead to death. The main vector of contagion is an insect (in Argentina, called…
  • “Globalizing schizophrenia and other severe mental disorders” – a 3-yr doctoral fellowship at CERMES3/EHESS (Paris) by Anne Lovell

    Anne Lovell
    28 Jul 2014 | 7:36 am
    CERMES3 announces a three-year doctoral fellowship (2014-2017) on “Globalizing schizophrenia and other severe mental disorders” financed through the European Research Council project GLOBHEALTH, “From international to global: Knowledge and diseases and the post-war government of health”. The PhD will be defended at the EHESS – Paris. This doctoral research should centre on a critical history of the development of international research on schizophrenia and other severe mental disorders and the central role of WHO, including but not limited to the 25-year WHO…
 
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    Visual Anthropology of Japan - 日本映像人類学

  • Restroom Etiquette: No Noodles in the Sink!

    22 Jul 2014 | 11:36 pm
    I found this notice posted in the restroom at a certain university in Osaka. Apparently someone doesn't know the rule about noodles in the bathroom...
  • ONLINE COURSE: Visualizing Japan

    19 Jul 2014 | 3:04 am
    Announcement from H-NET Notifications: Harvard-MIT MOOC: Visualizing Japan (1850s-1930s): Westernization, Protest, Modernity Seminar Date: 2014-09-03 Now open for registration. Free! A first-time MIT/Harvard MOOC (Massive Open Online Course), Visualizing Japan opens windows on Japan’s transition into the modern world through the historical visual record. Teachers include John Dower (MIT), Andrew Gordon (Harvard), and Gennifer Weisenfeld (Duke). This co-taught course looks at Japanese history and the skills and questions involved in reading history through images now accessible in digital…
  • "Arrest of Tokyo vagina artist sparks free expression protest"

    16 Jul 2014 | 7:30 am
    Here's an article about Japan's laws related to the visual (especially those deemed "obscene")... From Japan Today, July 16, 2014: Japanese police have arrested a Tokyo artist on obscenity charges for distributing data that allowed recipients to make 3D prints of her vagina, sparking protests over what supporters said was an attack on free expression. Megumi Igarashi, 42, who calls herself Rokude Nashiko which roughly translates as “bastard kid”, had been trying to raise funds online to pay for the construction of a kayak, using a 3D printer, modeled on the shape of her genitals. Japan…
  • ETHNOFEST Athens Ethnographic Film Festival: Call for Films - Xenophobia and the Ethnographic Film

    21 Jun 2014 | 11:30 pm
    The Athens Ethnographic Film Festival continues the exploration of the anthropological world through the image and is looking for films made by anthropologists (or related background), including students' works, either as dissertations or as assignments. The Athens Ethnographic Film Festival is introducing a new themed-screenings section, which will be showcasing ethnographic films focused on particular social issues. This year's theme is "xenophobia". As we consider issues of racist violence, aggressive expressions of nationalism and social exclusion to be of pressing relevance for the…
  • "Interrogation audiovisual recordings set to expand"

    20 Jun 2014 | 12:32 am
    From The Japan News, 20 June 2014: The Supreme Public Prosecutors Office said Wednesday it will expand the test interrogation audiovisual recording program from October. Currently under the program, public prosecutors record the questioning of criminal suspects in cases with lay judges, as well as suspects with mental disorders. The recording is conducted as part of prosecutors’ three-year efforts to restore credibility that was undermined by evidence falsification and cover-up scandals at the Osaka District Public Prosecutors Office. Now that the program has proved the recordings’…
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    International Cognition and Culture Institute

  • Random choice among the Kantu, swidden agriculturalists of Kalimantan

    19 Jul 2014 | 8:32 am
    An excellent post by Michael Schulson at Aeon magazine entitled "How to choose? When your reasons are worse than useless, sometimes the most rational choice is a random stab in the dark," showing, among other things, how rationality and expectations of rationality can clash."In the 1970s, a young American anthropologist named Michael Dove set out for Indonesia, intending to solve an ethnographic mystery. Then a graduate student at Stanford, Dove had been reading about the Kantu’, a group of subsistence farmers who live in the tropical forests of Borneo. The Kantu’…
  • Alberto Acerbi on cultural evolution

    18 Jun 2014 | 1:49 am
    Alberto Acerbi's excellent blog hosts a noteworthy discussion of Claidière, Scott-Phillips and Sperber's recent PTRS paper on cultural attraction. Alex Mesoudi, Thom Scott-Phillips and Dan Speber joined the discussion; Alberto concluded it.
  • Babies' and birds' causal understanding

    15 Jun 2014 | 3:37 am
    A very interesting comparison between crows and humans in a new (free access) paper in Proceedings of the Royal Society B entitled "Of babies and birds: complex tool behaviours are not sufficient for the evolution of the ability to create a novel causal ntervention" by Alex H. Taylor, Lucy G. Cheke, Anna Waismeyer, Andrew N. Meltzoff, Rachael Miller, Alison Gopnik, Nicola S. Clayton, and Russell D. Gray. Abstract: Humans are capable of simply observing a correlation between cause and effect, and then producing a novel behavioural pattern in order to recreate…
  • Kinship, theology and deep grammar

    13 May 2014 | 3:22 am
    One of the most salient paradoxes in the study of kinship systems is their sheer analytical complexity, from the point of view of an external observer, and simultaneously the ease by which those very same systems are assimilated by the natives themselves. Whereas no special training, costly rituals, harsh indoctrination seems to be needed to master the intricacies of kinship terminologies and marriage rules for those who are born into them, the situation for the anthropologist seems to be the very opposite. What could be the reason for this apparent inconsistency, simplicity for the native…
  • Deparmental Lectureship in Cognitive Anthropology, Oxford

    12 May 2014 | 7:30 am
    Applications are invited for a Departmental Lectureship in Cognitive Anthropology, effective from 1 September 2014, tenable until 30 September 2015. The post is based at the School of Anthropology, Banbury Road, Oxford, UK. The primary function of this post is to engage in lecturing, tutoring and the supervision of graduates and undergraduate students in cognitive and evolutionary anthropology. 
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    media/anthropology

  • How Spain’s indignados movement was born

    John Postill
    1 Aug 2014 | 5:31 am
    In this third instalment of the freedom technologists series we hear the extraordinary story of the IT specialist Daniel Vázquez, one of the original occupiers of Puerta del Sol square, in Madrid, where Spain’s indignados (or 15M) movement was born in May 2011. On the first night of the occupation, Daniel set up the soon-to-be influential Twitter account @acampadasol. The story below is based on a long interview he gave to a fellow indignado, the documentary filmmaker Stéphane Grueso, who we met in the previous post. The two-part interview (in Spanish with English subtitles) can be…
  • Freedom technologists and their practices

    John Postill
    24 Jul 2014 | 9:54 am
    This is the second in a series of 42 blog posts devoted to exploring the connection between freedom technologists and the new protest movements. See the first post here, the whole series as a document or as blog posts. In the first post of this series I defined freedom technologists as citizens who like to mix their techs with their politics, often as part of a popular protest or uprising. Some freedom technologists are techies, others are not, yet they all share a strong interest in the potential uses of new digital technologies for political change and social emancipation. But what do…
  • The year of the freedom technologist

    John Postill
    9 Jul 2014 | 7:04 pm
    By John Postill. Republished from Savage Minds This is the first in a series of 42 blog posts devoted to exploring the connection between freedom technologists and the new protest movements. See the next post here, the whole series as a document or as blog posts. Two and a half years ago, TIME magazine declared 2011 to be The Year of the Protester. From the Arab Spring or Spain’s indignados to the Occupy movement, this was undoubtedly a year of political upheaval around the world. But 2011 was also an important year for a new global vanguard of tech-minded citizens determined to bring about…
  • Podemos: Spain’s new ‘transmedia’ party

    John Postill
    12 Jun 2014 | 11:31 am
                      One of the biggest surprises in the recent European elections has been the sudden rise of the Spanish party Podemos (“We Can”), which obtained 8% of the vote in Spain. Podemos is a 4-month old, leftist formation rooted in the indignados (15M) movement and led by the charismatic political scientist Pablo Iglesias, 35. The following passage (my rough translation) is from a thoughtful analysis of the elections published today by another 15M-based party, Partido X, which is currently critically reviewing its own campaign.
  • Afterword to Consent of the Networked by Rebecca MacKinnon

    John Postill
    20 May 2014 | 7:11 pm
    The Worldwide Struggle for Internet Freedom. A book by Rebecca MacKinnon. http://consentofthenetworked.com/afterword-paperback/ In late January 2012, thousands of people across Poland took to the streets to protest the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA). The treaty had already been signed in late 2011 by European Union trade negotiators and twenty-two EU member states without much media attention, but by early February anti-ACTA protests had spread to over two hundred cities across Europe. Politicians got the message. On July 4, 2012, the European Parliament voted overwhelmingly…
 
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    Warped And Weft

  • A Weekend With The Shaman

    RJ Vigoda
    25 Jul 2014 | 9:25 am
    Classical shamanic practice has generated a renewed and widespread sense of interest within modern spiritual seekers. At issue is how well traditional shamanic concepts and techniques transfer to the denizens of contemporary societies. Can a practice considered by many to be an archaic remnant of earlier cultural thought worlds square with our current scientific and […] posted in Spirituality by RJ Vigoda Leave A Comment©2014 Warped And Weft. All Rights Reserved.
  • A Profound Synchronicity?

    RJ Vigoda
    17 Jun 2014 | 7:40 am
    The Problem Of Higher Meaning Within Personal And Subjective Experience As originally published in the Journal of Exceptional Experience and Psychology Vol. 1 No 2. ABSTRACT The study of transcendent phenomena frequently relies on the use of the personal and subjective experiences of individual informants. A recent personal synchronistic episode serves as the impetus to […] posted in Philosophy by RJ Vigoda Leave A Comment©2014 Warped And Weft. All Rights Reserved.
  • The Morality Of God

    RJ Vigoda
    28 Sep 2012 | 7:45 pm
    In Search Of An Ultimate Ethos With each passing year science and philosophy continue to offer more rational and persuasive explanations suggesting the original force from which all existence springs may contain a distinctive intelligence. Those who’ve never doubted the existence of such a creative, thinking ultimate power have traditionally assigned such an entity a […] posted in Philosophy by RJ Vigoda Leave A Comment©2014 Warped And Weft. All Rights Reserved.
  • Perils Of The Examined Life

    RJ Vigoda
    19 Jun 2012 | 12:16 pm
    The Neoplatonist Dilemma Any inclined to study the nature of being best heed the following advice: don’t go shopping for Ultimate truth unless you’re damn well ready for the consequences.  Such words may seem harsh but experience suggests they’re true.  Contrary to what many may think, gaining a better sense of one’s place in the […] posted in Philosophy by RJ Vigoda Leave A Comment©2014 Warped And Weft. All Rights Reserved.
  • Circular Reasoning

    RJ Vigoda
    10 Apr 2012 | 10:03 am
    Assessing The Mystery of Crop Circles Significant existential insights usually come in small and discreet forms. The novelties within the movement of sub-atomic particles, the existence of DNA or the faint signal of some distant cosmological process are so subtle as to be undetectable through ordinary sensation. Rarely is the perception of our being radically […] posted in Philosophy by RJ Vigoda Leave A Comment©2014 Warped And Weft. All Rights Reserved.
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    BOAS Network

  • Meet anthropologist Dr. Laurie Kauffman

    BOAS
    31 Jul 2014 | 2:09 pm
    Meet anthropologist Dr. Laurie Kauffman of Oklahoma City University! Here she discusses her work with squirrel monkeys in Costa Rica.
  • Meet Anthropologist Dr. Kerry M. Dore

    BOAS
    25 Jul 2014 | 9:39 am
    Meet anthropologist Dr. Kerry M. Dore! Here she discusses her work with vervet monkeys in St. Kitts. Vervet monkeys are not native to the island but have thrived in the lush landscape. As a result, their relationship with humans on the island is strained. Dr. Dore discusses options to help improve the monkey/human relationship. Check out more videos at www.boasnetwork.com
  • A Flower in the Mouth

    Jason Gardner
    24 Jul 2014 | 6:04 pm
    A Flower in the Mouth is a book by award-winning photographer Jason Gardner, showing the culture, music and rituals of the authentic, folkloric Carnaval festival in Pernambuco, Brazil. The 128pp book contains color and black & white images and interviews of the people shaping this dynamic culture, as well as writing from Jason’s experiences.  For more information and to purchase the book, go to http://www.jasongardner.net/shop/afitm The book also features a 9 track audio compilation, a download with music from the region. Image gallery here: http://www.jasongardner.net/afitm
  • Imperiled Amazon Indians Make 1st Contact with Outsiders

    BOAS
    10 Jul 2014 | 1:08 pm
    By Megan Gannon, News Editor | July 03, 2014 12:27pm ET Report Retrieved from Live Science Indigenous people with no prior contact to the outside world have just emerged from the Amazon rainforest in Brazil and made contact with a group of settled Indians, after being spotted migrating to evade illegal loggers, advocates say. The news, which was released July 2, comes after sightings of the uncontacted Indians in Brazil near the border with Peru, according to the group Survival International. Officials with the organization had warned last month that the isolated tribes face threats of…
  • ADHD and Evolution: Were Hyperactive Hunter-Gatherers Better Adapted?

    Joyce Mancini
    19 Jun 2014 | 12:07 pm
    Retrieved from Healthline Written by Brian Krans Medically Reviewed on November 25, 2012 by George Krucik, MD, MBA It can be hard for someone with ADHD to pay attention in boring lectures, stay focused on any one subject for long, or sit still when they just want to get up and go. People with ADHD are often those who stare out the window, daydreaming about what’s outside. It can feel at times like the structure of civilized society is too rigid and sedentary for those with brains that want to go, go, go. It’s an understandable viewpoint, considering that for 8 million years since the…
 
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