Anthropology

  • Most Topular Stories

  • Old World monkey had tiny, complex brain

    Anthropology News -- ScienceDaily
    3 Jul 2015 | 4:26 am
    The brain hidden inside the oldest known Old World monkey skull has been visualized for the first time. The ancient monkey, known as Victoriapithecus, first made headlines in 1997 when its 15 million-year-old skull was discovered on an island in Kenya's Lake Victoria. Now, X-ray imaging reveals that the creature's brain was tiny but surprisingly wrinkled and complex. The findings suggest that brain complexity can evolve before brain size in the primate family tree.
  • Summer Writing: Practice Community

    Savage Minds
    Lindsay Bell
    2 Jul 2015 | 5:41 pm
    Savage Minds welcomes guest blogger Lindsay Bell In the middle of the teaching term, summer is the far away season where you imagine that all of your academic, and possibly creative, writing projects will get off the ground. It is an oasis over the desert horizon. When summer finally arrives, you realize the large, luscious lagoon you imagined is more like a puddle. Desperate, you dive in anyways. The reality of the academic summer is that we continue to have competing demands on our time. We rush off to the field. Our families have a heightened sense of entitlement to interact with us.
  • The Cambrian Explosion’s Strange-Looking Poster Child

    NYT > Archaeology and Anthropology
    6 Jul 2015 | 9:00 pm
    For years, scientists struggled to explain the mysteries of a worm named Hallucigenia, but two new studies explain some of its quirks, and found it some cousins.
  • Oase1 had a Neandertal ancestor no earlier than ~200 years before his time

    Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog
    Dienekes
    24 Jun 2015 | 11:00 am
    Several important conclusions of the discovery that Oase1 had a Neandertal ancestor 4-6 generations before his time (37-42 thousand years ago):This is a smoking gun that modern humans interbred with Neandertals, following up on the publication of the Ust'Ishim and Kostenki-14 genomes; these two had longer Neandertal chunks than modern humans, from which it was estimated that their Neandertal admixture happened more than 50,000 years ago, roughly what one gets when looking at Neandertal chunks in modern humans alone. The Oase1 has even longer Neandertal chunks, and Neandertal admixture…
  • The new antropologi.info Anthropology Newspaper and News Ticker

    antropologi.info - anthropology in the news blog
    admin
    26 Jun 2015 | 5:08 am
    Would you like to get an overview over the most recent anthropology blog posts? The old newsticker did no longer work reliably, so I've created a new one. It is still work in progress, but so far it seems to work well. I tried to make it look more attractive, with a newspaper look, images and short excerpts with responsive design that also looks good on mobile devices. It also provides a tagcloud from all the categories that the blog authors assigned to their posts, a probably useful tool for exploring previous posts. The feeds are updated every two hours. Have a look at the new Anthropology…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Savage Minds

  • Summer Writing: Practice Community

    Lindsay Bell
    2 Jul 2015 | 5:41 pm
    Savage Minds welcomes guest blogger Lindsay Bell In the middle of the teaching term, summer is the far away season where you imagine that all of your academic, and possibly creative, writing projects will get off the ground. It is an oasis over the desert horizon. When summer finally arrives, you realize the large, luscious lagoon you imagined is more like a puddle. Desperate, you dive in anyways. The reality of the academic summer is that we continue to have competing demands on our time. We rush off to the field. Our families have a heightened sense of entitlement to interact with us.
  • Around the Web Digest: Week of June 28

    Rebecca Nelson
    28 Jun 2015 | 9:16 pm
    It’s been a rollercoaster week in US politics! Hope that, no matter where you are in the world, something in the news made you happy this week. Send me any blog links at rebecca.nelson.jacobs@gmail.com. According to this post on Media/Anthropology, bilingualism has a different social valence in Spain (where it signifies upward mobility) and Denmark (where it signifies loss of competency in Danish): Educating “Bilingual” Children in Spain and Denmark At Raving Anthropology, a student is chronicling her fieldwork on drug use and harm reduction in electronic dance music halls…
  • Kennedy and the Triumph of the Social

    Kerim
    26 Jun 2015 | 6:51 pm
    While everyone should be celebrating the monumental decision of the Supreme Court to recognize same-sex marriages, there is also something in there that, along with this weeks’ ruling on the Fair Housing Act in Texas, should warm the hearts of social scientists in particular. Both of these decisions, in different ways, have advanced the view that our understanding of the real world matters for deciding legal principles. In Obergefell v. Hodges Kennedy argued that the proper interpretation of the constitution, of what it means to be “equal,” is subject to shifting societal…
  • Senses of Connection

    Sienna Craig
    26 Jun 2015 | 5:00 am
    I tell you this to break your heart, by which I mean only that it break open and never close again to the rest of the world —Mary Oliver It is a knot, an ache, this longing to be present in Nepal right now. Even so, virtual presence fosters awareness. The Internet has become a strange safety net, catching us as we fall into senses of connection. The initial social media push to mark people as “safe” and to track immediate needs as well as report destruction after the two major earthquakes was truly remarkable. Mark Zuckerberg’s stated commitment of substantial Nepal relief funds…
  • Committing Crimes during Fieldwork: Ethics, Ethnography, and “On The Run”

    Rex
    25 Jun 2015 | 1:42 pm
    At this point the debate about Alice Goffman’s book On The Run looks something like this: Goffman writes a successful ethnography. Journalists are peeved that Goffman followed social science protocols and not journalistic ones. Journalist verify that Goffman’s book is accurate. Journalists remain peeved that Goffman followed social science protocols and not journalistic ones. Although I’m sure no one feels this way, I think this is a success for everyone: Goffman is more or less vindicated, her discipline demonstrates it can withstand external scrutiny, and journalists…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Anthropology News -- ScienceDaily

  • Old World monkey had tiny, complex brain

    3 Jul 2015 | 4:26 am
    The brain hidden inside the oldest known Old World monkey skull has been visualized for the first time. The ancient monkey, known as Victoriapithecus, first made headlines in 1997 when its 15 million-year-old skull was discovered on an island in Kenya's Lake Victoria. Now, X-ray imaging reveals that the creature's brain was tiny but surprisingly wrinkled and complex. The findings suggest that brain complexity can evolve before brain size in the primate family tree.
  • How our sense of smell evolved, including in early humans

    2 Jul 2015 | 8:21 am
    A group of scientists has studied how our sense of smell has evolved, and has even reconstructed how a long-extinct human relative would have been able to smell.
  • Scarlet macaw skeletons point to early emergence of Pueblo hierarchy

    22 Jun 2015 | 12:45 pm
    New work on the skeletal remains of scarlet macaws found in an ancient Pueblo settlement indicates that social and political hierarchies may have emerged in the American Southwest earlier than previously thought. The findings suggest that the acquisition and control of macaws, along with other culturally significant items like chocolate and turquoise, may have facilitated the development of hierarchy in the society.
  • Early modern humans interbred with Neanderthals

    22 Jun 2015 | 9:27 am
    Genetic analysis of a 40,000-year-old jawbone from Romania reveals that early modern humans interbred with Neanderthals when they first came to Europe.
  • Kennewick Man closely related to Native Americans, geneticists say

    18 Jun 2015 | 10:44 am
    DNA from the 8,500-year-old skeleton of an adult man found in 1996, in Washington, is more closely related to Native American populations than to any other population in the world, according to an international collaborative study.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog

  • Oase1 had a Neandertal ancestor no earlier than ~200 years before his time

    Dienekes
    24 Jun 2015 | 11:00 am
    Several important conclusions of the discovery that Oase1 had a Neandertal ancestor 4-6 generations before his time (37-42 thousand years ago):This is a smoking gun that modern humans interbred with Neandertals, following up on the publication of the Ust'Ishim and Kostenki-14 genomes; these two had longer Neandertal chunks than modern humans, from which it was estimated that their Neandertal admixture happened more than 50,000 years ago, roughly what one gets when looking at Neandertal chunks in modern humans alone. The Oase1 has even longer Neandertal chunks, and Neandertal admixture…
  • DNA from hot climates technically feasible

    Dienekes
    20 Jun 2015 | 3:52 am
    From the paper: Ten petrous bones were selected from archaeological specimens, representing a wide range of geographical locations and climatic contexts (Table 1, for repository information see S1 File). The specimens were selected from Central Europe, Central Asia, Southeast Asia, the Levant, Anatolia, and North Africa. The specimens are from Holocene archaeological contexts dated to between 10,000–1,800 calibrated years before present (cal. BP). The samples from Nubia, Jordan and Turkmenistan are from hot and arid regions. The sample from Turkey is from the Eastern Mediterranean…
  • Kennewick Man was a Native American

    Dienekes
    18 Jun 2015 | 10:39 am
    Nature (2015) doi:10.1038/nature14625 The ancestry and affiliations of Kennewick Man Morten Rasmussen, Martin Sikora, Anders Albrechtsen, Thorfinn Sand Korneliussen, J. Víctor Moreno-Mayar, G. David Poznik, Christoph P. E. Zollikofer, Marcia S. Ponce de León, Morten E. Allentoft, Ida Moltke, Hákon Jónsson, Cristina Valdiosera, Ripan S. Malhi, Ludovic Orlando, Carlos D. Bustamante, Thomas W. Stafford Jr, David J. Meltzer, Rasmus Nielsen & Eske Willerslev Kennewick Man, referred to as the Ancient One by Native Americans, is a male human skeleton discovered in Washington state (USA) in…
  • Into, out of, and across the Eurasian steppe

    Dienekes
    13 Jun 2015 | 11:05 am
    A new paper in Nature adds to the earlier study in the same journal by presenting data from 101 ancient Eurasians. The year is not yet halfway over, but it seems that the ancient DNA field is moving towards a new norm of studying dozens of individuals at a time and comprehensively tackling the "big problems" that have vexed archaeologists, linguists, and historians for decades if not centuries. The first conclusion of the new study is the detection of the migration from the steppe to Europe that was the title piece of the earlier study. The authors do not present quantitative estimates of the…
  • 101 ancient genomes from Bronze Age Eurasia

    Dienekes
    10 Jun 2015 | 2:38 am
    New data has been posted online. This seems related to this earlier post. Hopefully the study linked to this data will appear soon, but genome bloggers can get to it thanks to the early data release.Investigation of Bronze Age in Eurasia by sequencing from 101 ancient human remains. The Bronze Age (BA) of Eurasia (c. 3,000-1,000 years BC, 3-1 ka BC) was a period of major cultural changes. Earlier hunter-gathering and farming cultures in Europe and Asia were replaced by cultures associated with completely new perceptions and technologies inspired by early urban civilization. It remains…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    antropologi.info - anthropology in the news blog

  • The new antropologi.info Anthropology Newspaper and News Ticker

    admin
    26 Jun 2015 | 5:08 am
    Would you like to get an overview over the most recent anthropology blog posts? The old newsticker did no longer work reliably, so I've created a new one. It is still work in progress, but so far it seems to work well. I tried to make it look more attractive, with a newspaper look, images and short excerpts with responsive design that also looks good on mobile devices. It also provides a tagcloud from all the categories that the blog authors assigned to their posts, a probably useful tool for exploring previous posts. The feeds are updated every two hours. Have a look at the new Anthropology…
  • Anthropologists on deported migrants, unusual bureaucrats, and the thriving solidarity economy in Greece

    admin
    12 Apr 2015 | 6:13 am
    While I am trying to get back into the blogging business, here three selected pieces that I've written recently for the University of Oslo. Two of them are accounts on somehow positive change that is happening. Many anthropologists have contributed to the understanding of the economic crisis in many parts of the world during the recent years, see among others the earlier posts "Use Anthropology to Build A Human Economy" or "Similar to the Third World debt crisis" - David Graeber on 'Occupy Wall Street'. But few studies deal with the ways people tried to create…
  • Two new anthropology blogs from Norway: Thomas Hylland Eriksen and Sindre Bangstad

    admin
    11 Nov 2014 | 7:31 am
    Lots of new anthropology blogs have been started up recently, most of them have made it into the overviews here at antropologi.info: the anthropology blog newspaper http://www.antropologi.info/blog/ and the - I think - more reader-friendly anthropology blog news ticker http://www.antropologi.info/feeds/anthropology/ (if not, let me know!) Now, I'd like to mention especially two blogs. The first one is Thomas Hylland Eriksen's blog at http://thomashyllanderiksen.net He is one of the most visible anthropologists in the public, he set up his first website already back in prehistoric 1996…
  • What the life of a pair of flip-flops can teach us about migration, inequality and studying up

    admin
    11 Nov 2014 | 3:04 am
    Photo: Cíntia Regina, flickr During the recent (nearly) two years, I've been interviewing researchers that are part of the research project Overheating. The three crises of globalisation: An anthropological history of the early 21st century at the University of Oslo, starting with Thomas Hylland Eriksen: Anthropologists to study humanity’s biggest crises. I also interviewed most of the researchers that were invited to hold seminars. One of the texts that for me was most fun to write was about the research by sociologist Caroline Knowles. For seven years, she has been following a…
  • 10 years antropologi.info and what about the future?

    admin
    12 Sep 2014 | 3:30 pm
    Although it was ten years ago I started this blog and anthropology portal, I am not sure if there is something to celebrate. The website has been more or less dormant for nearly two years now. Despite several attempts to start up blogging again, I failed to keep it going. But now, because of the anniversary, what about starting another attempt? Life is more or less upside down after I went to Cairo, Egypt, three years ago and got stuck here. It was supposed to be a short trip, but I ended up getting married here. That was the most wonderful thing that ever happened to me. But I still have to…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Material World

  • Call for papers: The art market in a global perspective

    Haidy Geismar
    29 Jun 2015 | 12:57 am
    Via Olav Velthuis, University of Amsterdam 28-30 January 2016, University of Amsterdam, Department of Sociology The aim of this multidisciplinary international conference is to bring together theoretical perspectives (ranging from sociology, anthropology, art history, economics and geography) that help advance our understanding of how art markets function, while offering high-level qualitative and quantitative empirical contributions to their local and global articulations. We particularly welcome contributions on emerging art markets in countries such as China, Russia, South Africa, Turkey,…
  • Job Search: Professor of Photographic History, De Montfort University

    admin
    16 Jun 2015 | 7:41 am
    Faculty of Art, Design and Humanities On the retirement of Professor Elizabeth Edwards, applications are invited for the full-time, permanent post of Professor of Photographic History, based within the School of Humanities. The successful candidate will be appointed as the Director of the Photographic History Research Centre which was established in 2010 and is already widely acknowledged as a world-leading centre for the interdisciplinary study of the history of photography in all its aspects. He or she will also be expected to contribute to the broader development of History and of…
  • Occasional Paper 5: Mr Coperthwaite – a life in the Maine Woods

    Haidy Geismar
    11 Jun 2015 | 4:15 am
    Anna Grimshaw, Emory University In 1960, Bill Coperthwaite bought 300 acres of wilderness in Machiasport, Maine. Influenced by the poetry of Emily Dickinson and by the back to the land movement of Scott and Helen Nearing, Bill Coperthwaite was committed to what he called“a handmade life.”   For over fifty years until his death in 2013, he lived and worked in the forest. He was a builder of yurts, and a maker of spoons, bowls and chairs. I met Bill Coperthwaite not long after I bought a house in Machiasport.   He was, of course, well-known to local people, many of whom affectionately…
  • From Home Movies to Homs

    Haidy Geismar
    19 May 2015 | 5:08 am
    The amateur film is becoming a global visual lingua franca, a consequence of the conjuncture of the digital with new and widely accessible film technologies (notably the camera phone) and new methods of distribution (open access video platforms, typified by YouTube). Amateur film now saturates online media discourse as well as personal and social media communication. Its ubiquity is one visible example of the current radical shift in media systems, whilst the films themselves are both reshaping the formal language of the moving image and refashioning the representation, mediation, and even…
  • Popular Art and Portuguese Identity. Anatomy of an Exhibition

    Haidy Geismar
    19 May 2015 | 4:58 am
    An event with Professor Anthony Shelton Thursday 21 May 2015, 6pm, Room G01, School of Arts, Birkbeck, University of London, 43 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PD Between the 1920s-1950s, rural popular art became an important part of the government-sponsored re-creation of Portuguese national identity and history. Books and articles were written about popular art, films were produced on it and domestic and international exhibitions displayed it, creating a particularly Portuguese ‘taste’ that hid the dire conditions of poverty, suffering, and illiteracy that characterized many of its rural…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Museum Anthropology

  • Feds Petitioned to Investigate Sale of Native Objects by East Coast School

    3 Jul 2015 | 1:34 am
    Sealaska Stories in the News  June 26 2015 Sealaska Heritage Institute is asking the federal government to investigate whether the planned sale of a Native American art collection by a Massachusetts school is legal under repatriation laws. The Andover Newton Theological School (ANTS) is moving to sell the collection, which contains 1,100 objects, including 125 works of Native American art
  • Call for Submissions: 2016 SAA Meetings in Orlando, Florida

    23 Jun 2015 | 2:51 am
    Excavating the Museum: New Research on Old Collections (sponsored by the SAA Fiber Perishables Interest Group) Organized by Maxine McBrinn and Laurie Webster Abstract: Most anthropology or natural history museums have hidden treasures in their collections, materials collected but not published or inadequately published. Many of these collections have never been completely analyzed or
  • U.S. Repatriates 25 Looted Artifacts from Museum Collections to Italy

    2 Jun 2015 | 8:05 am
    The New York Daily News & The Associated Press May 26, 2015 The U.S. on Tuesday officially returned 25 artifacts looted over the decades from Italy, including Etruscan vases, 1st-century frescoes and precious books that ended up in U.S. museums, universities and private collections. Italy has been on a campaign to recover looted artifacts, using the courts and public shaming to compel
  • Paris Auction House Set to Sell More Sacred Objects

    29 May 2015 | 8:03 am
    The Navajo-Hopi Observer May 26, 2015 On May 12, the Hopi Tribe received notice from Eric Wilson, Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) International Affairs Coordination, that the U.S. Embassy in Paris, France learned of another auction the EVE Auction House plans for June 1.  Included in the auction catalog are objects of Native-American tribal origin.  The Office of the Assistant Secretary
  • Elgin Marbles Legal Action Ruled Out by Greece

    19 May 2015 | 12:58 pm
    BBC UK, 14 May 2015 Greece has ruled out taking legal action against the UK to reclaim the Elgin Marbles from the British Museum.In an unexpected move, Greece's culture minister said the country would pursue a "diplomatic and political" approach to retrieving the sculptures instead.In doing so, the country has rejected the advice of barrister Amal Clooney, who had urged Greece to take Britain
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Somatosphere

  • In the Journals, June 2015 — Part II by Aaron Seaman

    Aaron Seaman
    3 Jul 2015 | 5:20 pm
    Starting off the second half of June’s journal roundup, we have some special issues. Two have been highlighted on Somatosphere: BioSocieties, “Alimentary Uncertainties: From Contested Evidence to Policy“; and Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry, “Conceptualizing Autism Around the Globe“. A third, from Medical Humanities on critical medical humanities, also will be posted in the coming days. Anthropology and Aging Quarterly (Open Access) Tokens of trauma: The ageing experience of Shoah survivors in a Jewish support centre. Ben Kasstan This paper explores the…
  • Critical Medical Humanities – A special feature of Medical Humanities by Elizabeth Lewis

    Elizabeth Lewis
    3 Jul 2015 | 10:55 am
    The June issue of Medical Humanities includes a special feature section entitled “Critical Medical Humanities.” This collection opens with a piece by William Viney, Felicity Callard, and Angela Woods, “Critical Medical Humanities: Embracing Entanglement, Taking Risks.” As described in their abstract: What can the medical humanities achieve? This paper does not seek to define what is meant by the medical humanities, nor to adjudicate the exact disciplinary or interdisciplinary knowledges it should offer, but rather to consider what it might be capable of doing.
  • In the Journals, June 2015 – Part I by Elizabeth Lewis

    Elizabeth Lewis
    2 Jul 2015 | 9:56 pm
    Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute Deaf Bodies and Corporate Bodies: New Regimes of Value in Bangalore’s Business Process Outsourcing Sector Michele Friedner This article ethnographically analyses how groups (and not just individuals) are produced in business process outsourcing (BPO) workplaces. In order to mitigate an unstable labour pool, corporations hire deaf workers to perform identical BPO work regardless of their qualifications and backgrounds. These hiring practices serve to cement existing relationships and produce deaf workers as a group marked only by deafness. This…
  • Web Roundup: Assorted stories by Lily Shapiro

    Lily Shapiro
    30 Jun 2015 | 11:37 am
    It’s been a very busy week, and I imagine everyone has been reading a lot about Charleston, SCOTUS, the ISIS attacks, and Greece. This web roundup isn’t going to be about any of those things, per se, instead it’s an attempt to fill you in on this month’s interesting stories that you might have missed. In one quick follow-up to the latest SCOTUS decision, I will start off with a neat piece The Atlantic did about how/whether Facebook will use the data on its users generated by the rainbow profile pictures. The Washington Post, too, has an article on the rainbow profile pictures, and…
  • Conceptualizing Autism Around the Globe — A special issue of Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry by Aaron Seaman

    Aaron Seaman
    29 Jun 2015 | 8:00 am
    The current issue of Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry is a special issue, edited by M. Ariel Cascio and entitled “Conceptualizing Autism Around the Globe“. Along with six original articles, the issue is framed by an introduction by Cascio, “Cross-Cultural Autism Studies, Neurodiversity, and Conceptualizations of Autism“, and a closing commentary by Roy Richard Grinker, “Reframing the Science and Anthropology of Autism“. As Grinker writes, pointing toward the importance of a comparative approach to studying autism: The concept of culture in autism research…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Visual Anthropology of Japan - 日本映像人類学

  • "Court in Japan orders Google to delete past reports of man's arrest"

    4 Jul 2015 | 8:22 am
    From Japan Today, 7/4/15: The Saitama District Court has ordered Google to remove news reports from more than three years ago concerning a man who was arrested on charges of molesting a girl under 18. Last month, the man filed a suit claiming that Google search results pertaining to his arrest older than three years was a violation of his personal rights, Sankei Shimbun reported. In 2012, the man was arrested for paying a girl under the age of 18 for sexual favors. He was charged with violating child prostitution laws and fined 500,000 yen. However, his name and news reports regarding the…
  • Filmmaking for Fieldwork

    4 Jul 2015 | 1:11 am
    Image borrowed from All Rites Reversed web site.Announcement via the Visual Anthropology Forum: AllRitesReversed are presenting a two week intensive filmmaking course in association with Futureworks School of Media and with teachers resident at The Granada Centre for Visual Anthropology at the University of Manchester. This highly successful short course, now in its seventh year, has attracted many experts in the field of Visual Anthropology. Filmmaking For Fieldwork runs in central Manchester (UK) each summer and there are exciting plans to take the course on the road to global…
  • Cool Japan Fashion?

    28 Jun 2015 | 10:56 pm
    Images borrowed from s0ciety6.VAOJ Disclaimer: This is not a product endorsement or fashion advice of any kind - only a sampling of what is out there... More info: http://society6.com/product/the-great-wave-of-pug_leggings?utm_source=twitter&utm_campaign=1119&utm_content=42268#56=415And of course you need the shoes to match... Image borrowed from Japan Today, 5/13/15.More info: https://www.japantoday.com/smartphone/view/new-products/combine-your-love-of-godzilla-ukiyo-e-and-fashion-with-shoes
  • "Bag-snatching suspect arrested after pursuer takes photo of his bike license plate"

    22 Jun 2015 | 10:31 pm
    From Japan Today, 6/23/15: Police in Osaka said Monday they have arrested a 45-year-old office worker on suspicion of snatching a woman’s handbag as she walked along a street. According to police, the suspect, identified as Taro Muramoto, approached the 64-year-old-woman on his minibike as she was walking with her husband in Chuo Ward at around 1:55 p.m. Sunday, Fuji TV reported. After the suspect grabbed the woman’s handbag, the couple yelled out at him. A man on a bicycle chased after the minibike, but before it could speed away, he used his smartphone to take a photo of the…
  • View from my Hotel Window in Hanzomon, Tokyo at 11:42 PM on a Friday Night

    21 Jun 2015 | 8:33 am
    In sharp contrast to rural Kabuto-cho in Aichi, it never seems to get dark in Tokyo. Light-blocking curtains are a premium amenity...
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    International Cognition and Culture Institute

  • Communication without Metapsychology

    2 Jul 2015 | 9:58 pm
    This is an excellent book. I cannot think of another on this topic that matches its clarity, concision, accessibility, comprehensiveness, and argumentative rigor. I’m quite amazed that Scott-Phillips has managed to combine such seemingly antithetical virtues in one work. The discussion is also admirably honest: Scott-Phillips owns up to the obvious weaknesses with the view and offers strong responses.I am a little embarrassed and anxious, therefore, because I disagree with most of the main theses of the book. Not all of them. Scott-Phillips persuades me that pure code theories of language…
  • A closer look at communication among our closest relatives

    2 Jul 2015 | 6:58 pm
    I am writing this while conducting fieldwork in Zambia, with only very limited access to the internet. Therefore, I could not read already existing posts and the corresponding responses and discussions, and some of the issues I will refer to might have been raised by others already. However, as a researcher interested in the gestural and facial communication of great apes, I want to offer some comments and facts from a comparative perspective on human communication and language evolution. As a more general comment, I specifically liked the way Thom Scott-Phillips navigates the reader through…
  • Cats, tacs and kunvenshuns

    1 Jul 2015 | 7:13 pm
    First of all, thanks to Thom for his excellent book. I agree completely that pragmatics has been under-represented in discussions of the evolution of language (with the notable exceptions you mention). I was, I recall, the only pragmaticist speaking at Evolang in Paris in 2001. I recall also that I was advised in the strongest possible terms not to go by a certain person: he knows who he is, but shall remain nameless! Thanks also to Tiffany and Olivier, and to cognitionandculture.net, for inviting me to participate.As someone whose interest in relevance theory has come via linguistics, rather…
  • Natural language and the language of thought

    29 Jun 2015 | 11:21 pm
    I found Thom’s book extremely illuminating, insightful and enjoyable. I learned a great deal from it, and look forward to this online discussion, from which I’m sure I’ll learn a lot more. One point where I was left feeling rather frustrated was in the brief discussion of Chomsky’s views on language and adaptation (section 6.2). I had been hoping to get some guidance on how to think about the increasingly acrimonious debates between Chomsky and others on the existence or non-existence of a dedicated language faculty or Universal Grammar, but Thom remains officially neutral on this. As…
  • Inferential communication and information theory

    29 Jun 2015 | 4:53 pm
    Speaking Our Minds is a timely book that very effectively frames many of the current important problems facing researchers interested in the nature of language and communication. Too few scholars today are worried simultaneously about evolutionary psychology and pragmatics, and ever since my introduction to Thom’s work with his article “Defining biological communication” I have found myself often in high agreement with his conclusions. That said, the main point of contention I would like to bring to the group here is actually a fairly fundamental issue in which my own view has recently…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    media/anthropology

  • Educating ‘bilingual’ children in Spain and Denmark

    John Postill
    26 Jun 2015 | 6:09 am
    Educating ‘bilingual’ children in Spain and Denmark: childhood bilingualism as opportunity or constraint by Kenn Nakata Steffensen University College Cork/University of Tokyo See PDF  The word ‘bilingual’ has acquired vastly divergent politicised meanings in contemporary Spanish and Danish discourses on childhood education. In the former, it tends to denote competence in a foreign language, which is almost universally assumed to be English, while in the latter it refers to relative lack of competence in Danish. The two conceptions of ‘bilingualism’ as an opportunity or constraint…
  • Review of The Logic of Connective Action by Bennett and Segerberg

    John Postill
    25 Jun 2015 | 6:33 am
    The Logic of Connective Action: Digital Media and the Personalization of Contentious Politics W.L. Bennett and A. Segerberg. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013. 240 pp. John Postill RMIT University 24 June 2015 Book review for International Journal of Press/Politics (IJPP) (forthcoming 2015). See PDF The Logic of Connective Action asks a timely question, namely ‘how digitally networked action works in an era of increasingly personalised political participation’ (p. 211). The book’s premise is that the long-term decline in membership of civic and political organisations observed…
  • 21. Review of Hacker, Hoaxer, Whistleblower, Spy: The Many Faces of Anonymous

    John Postill
    11 Jun 2015 | 6:13 pm
    Hacker, Hoaxer, Whistleblower, Spy: The Many Faces of Anonymous. Gabriella Coleman. Brooklyn, NY: Verso Books, 2014. 464 pp. John Postill RMIT University Melbourne, 12 June 2015 forthcoming, American Anthropologist PDF: https://rmit.academia.edu/JohnPostill/Book-Reviews The past five years have seen a global flourishing of political initiatives in which tech-minded actors of different kinds (geeks, hackers, bloggers, online journalists, citizen politicians, etc.) have played prominent roles. From whistleblowing to online protests, from occupied squares to anti-establishment parties, these…
  • Barcelona’s local elections in the global spotlight

    John Postill
    29 May 2015 | 7:28 am
    Less than a week ago, on 24 May 2015, local and regional elections were held across Spain. In Barcelona, Madrid and other major cities, new anti-establishment candidates either won or came very close to winning, signalling a major change in the country’s political landscape. These events are being followed with great interest around the world. Here is a quick round-up of some of the reports coming out of Barcelona. Image by Maria Castelló Solbés via Popular Resistance Soon after midnight, the Diagonal news site already reported (in Spanish) that ‘the citizen candidatures have…
  • 20. Hacking politics: civic struggles to politicize technologies

    John Postill
    1 May 2015 | 9:33 pm
    This is the 20th of 42 posts in the ongoing Freedom technologists series. By Sebastian Kubitschko via Civic Media Project Despite the longstanding equating of hacking as infused with political significance, the scope and style of hackers’ engagement with institutionalized politics remains poorly understood. Based on face-to-face interviews, participant observations and media analysis over three years (2011-2014), this case study of the Chaos Computer Club (CCC)—Europe’s largest and one of the world’s oldest hacker collectives—fills parts of this gap. It shows that hackers practice a…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    American Journal of Physical Anthropology

  • Preparation and use of varied natural tools for extractive foraging by bonobos (Pan Paniscus)

    Itai Roffman, Sue Savage-Rumbaugh, Elizabeth Rubert-Pugh, André Stadler, Avraham Ronen, Eviatar Nevo
    29 Jun 2015 | 2:44 am
    Abstract ObjectivesThe tool-assisted extractive foraging capabilities of captive (zoo) and semi-captive (sanctuary) bonobo (Pan paniscus) groups were compared to each other and to those known in wild chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) cultures. Materials and MethodsThe bonobos were provided with natural raw materials and challenged with tasks not previously encountered, in experimental settings simulating natural contexts where resources requiring special retrieval efforts were hidden. They were shown that food was buried underground or inserted into long bone cavities, and left to tackle the tasks…
  • The last fossil primate in North America, new material of the enigmatic Ekgmowechashala from the Arikareean of Oregon

    Joshua X. Samuels, L. Barry Albright, Theodore J. Fremd
    29 Jun 2015 | 2:43 am
    ABSTRACT ObjectivePrimates were common in North America through most of the Eocene, but vanished in the Chadronian, about 35 million years ago. In the Arikareean, about 6 million years later, the enigmatic primate Ekgmowechashala appeared in the Great Plains and Oregon. This taxon shows little resemblance to other North American primates and its phylogenetic position has long been debated. New material of this taxon allows a revised assessment of its age and how it is related to other primates. MethodsRecently collected Ekgmowechashala specimens from the Turtle Cove Member of the John Day…
  • The use of non-adult vertebral dimensions as indicators of growth disruption and non-specific health stress in skeletal populations

    Sophie L. Newman, Rebecca L. Gowland
    29 Jun 2015 | 2:42 am
    ABSTRACT ObjectiveTraditional methods of detecting growth disruption have focused on deficiencies in the diaphyseal length of the long bones. This study proposes the implementation of vertebral measurements (body height and transverse diameter of the neural canal) from non-adults (0–17 years) as a new methodology for the identification of growth disruption. MethodsMeasurements of vertebral body height and transverse diameter were taken from 96 non-adult skeletons and 40 adult skeletons from two post-medieval sites in England (Bow Baptist, London and Coronation Street, South Shields).
  • The Paternal Provisioning Hypothesis: Effects of workload and testosterone production on men's musculature

    Louis Calistro Alvarado, Martin N. Muller, Melissa Emery Thompson, Magdalena Klimek, Ilona Nenko, Grazyna Jasienska
    29 Jun 2015 | 2:41 am
    Abstract ObjectivesTestosterone supports male reproduction through a broad range of behavioral and physiological effects, including the maintenance of sexually dimorphic muscle used in male-male competition. Although it is often assumed that a persistent relationship exists between men's testosterone production and musculature, most studies either fail to find evidence for such a relationship, or document very weak associations. In nonhuman primates, by contrast, correlations between testosterone and muscle mass are higher. Here, we propose the “Paternal Provisioning Hypothesis,” which…
  • Using isotopic evidence to assess the impact of migration and the two-layer hypothesis in prehistoric Northeast Thailand

    Charlotte L. King, Nancy Tayles, Charles Higham, Una Strand-Viđarsdóttir, R. Alexander Bentley, Colin G. Macpherson, Geoff Nowell
    29 Jun 2015 | 2:41 am
    ABSTRACT ObjectivesThe nature of the agricultural transition in Southeast Asia has been a topic of some debate for archaeologists over the past decades. A prominent model, known as the two-layer hypothesis, states that indigenous hunter-gatherers were subsumed by the expansion of exotic Neolithic farmers into the area around 2000 BC. These farmers had ultimate origins in East Asia and brought rice and millet agriculture. Ban Non Wat is one of the few archaeological sites in Southeast Asia where this model can potentially be tested. The site is located in the Mun River valley of Northeast…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    BOAS Network

  • Coupling and Culture: What has marriage been “since the beginning of human history?”

    BOAS
    1 Jul 2015 | 3:20 pm
    Post published by Rosemary Joyce Ph.D. on Feb 04, 2012 in What Makes Us Human photo: “The young housekeepers, a year after marriage” Source: http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/00652065/ There is a slogan that I find inspiring: “You are entitled to your own opinions, but not to your own facts.” Sometimes, though, it is hard to uphold this: trying to challenge the way that politicians, in particular, attempt to ground their policy arguments in claims about what is natural for humans can seem impossible. And you do it knowing that the politicians involved, and their…
  • Dr. Dan Dediu: Santa Barbara Symposium on Human Origins II

    BOAS
    23 Jun 2015 | 4:14 pm
    BOAS Network presents: Santa Barbara Symposium on Human Origins II. Dr. Dan Dediu, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics. Morning Session: The Settlement of the Eurasia by Homo Sapiens, Friday September 12, 2014.
  • 5 Important Anthropological Sites in India

    BOAS
    23 Jun 2015 | 3:53 pm
    By Rohit Agarwal —- India is a land of rich ancient civilisation. Through various artefacts, archaeological findings and of course books, we have studied a great deal about the nature of mankind that existed in the ancient times. History loudly speaks that India was one of the most progressive civilisations in the ancient time. India was known for its architectural miracles including bridges, temples and fortified cities. Even today, ancient forts built during the 15th and 16th centuries stand strongly on the Indian soil. There is a strong archaeological proof that practices like rock…
  • Jane Goodall on Canada’s conservation record and being vegetarian

    BOAS
    22 May 2015 | 2:03 pm
    The Globe’s Ivan Semeniuk sits down with Jane Goodall to discuss her view on Canada’s environmental record under Stephen Harper and her vegetarianism.
  • Scientists Investigate a Medieval Mass Grave

    BOAS
    15 May 2015 | 12:02 pm
    An archeologist from Inrap excavates a mass grave below a supermarket in Paris (Denis Gliksman/Inrap) By Marissa Fessenden Retrieved from smithsonian.com May 13, 2015 Renovation work uncovered hundreds of individuals, perhaps all killed by disease at the same time When the Monoprix Réaumur-Sébastopol supermarket in Paris, France, decided to renovated their basement to get more storage space, they probably didn’t expect to uncover hundreds of human bones. But when they dug into the basement floor, that’s exactly what they discovered. The human remains are, apparently, the legacy of a…
 
Log in